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21. Star Trek - Insurrection (Special
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22. Willy Wonka and the Chocolate
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23. Seven (New Line Platinum Series)
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24. Local Hero
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40. Cabaret

21. Star Trek - Insurrection (Special Collector's Edition)
Director: Jonathan Frakes
list price: $19.99
our price: $13.99
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Asin: B0007Y08PQ
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 73
Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

Star Trek fans were decidedly mixed in their reactions to this, the ninth big-screen feature in Paramount's lucrative Trek franchise, but die-hard loyalists will appreciate the way this Next Generation adventure rekindles the spirit of the original Trek TV series while combining a tolerable dose of New-Agey philosophy with a light-hearted plot for the NextGen cast. This time out, Picard (Patrick Stewart) and his executive crew must transport to a Shangri-la-like planet to see why their android crewmate Data (Brent Spiner) has run amuck in a village full of peaceful Ba'ku artisans who--thanks to their planet's "metaphasic radiation"--haven't aged in 309 years.

It turns out there's a conspiracy afoot, masterminded by the devious, gruesomely aged Ru'afo (F. Murray Abraham, hamming it up under makeup resembling a cosmetic surgeon's worst nightmare), who's in cahoots with a renegade Starfleet admiral (Anthony Zerbe, in one of his final screen roles). They covet the fountain-of-youth power of the Ba'ku planet, but because their takeover plan violates Starfleet's Prime Directive of noninterference, it's up to Picard & crew to stop the scheme. Along the way, they all benefit from the metaphasic effect, which manifests itself as Worf's puberty (visible as a conspicuous case of Klingon acne), Picard's youthful romance with a Ba'ku woman (the lovely Donna Murphy), the touching though temporary return of Geordi's natural eyesight, and a moment when Troi asks Dr. Crusher if she's noticed that her "boobs are firming up."

Some fans scoffed at these humorous asides, but they're what make this Trek film as entertaining as it is slightly disappointing. Without the laughs (including Data's rousing excerpt from Gilbert & Sullivan's HMS Pinafore), this is a pretty routine entry in the franchise, with no real surprises, a number of plot holes, and the overall appearance of a big-budget TV episode. As costar and director, Jonathan Frakes proves a capable carrier of the Star Trek flame--and it's nice to see women in their forties portrayed as smart and sexy--but while this is surely an adequate Trek adventure, it doesn't quite rank with the best in the series. --Jeff Shannon ... Read more

Reviews (410)

5-0 out of 5 stars True DTS 5.1 Surround Sound Not Listed
Dear M. IMRAN "aka imranbecks,"

The last Star Trek Movie "First Contact" was not release in DTS 5.1 on the theaters.Just like every other DVD that claims to be in DTS does not have the true DTS sound to them because they were not film with DTS sound, with a few exceptions of course.

The listing on Amazon.com only states Dolby while the last two Star Trek Movies states DTS 5.1."Star Trek Insurrection" was film in true DTS Surround Sound and I am just hoping that it is release this way.That Amazon made a mistake but they probably didn't.

Please check this out and confirm if there is a DTS version of this movie.

When it comes to the movie I put it on the top with the few other movies that avoided the Star Wars style.Star Trek is a science fiction dealing with idea and subjects to think about not to have the old one on one battle routine.I know they fought back against the robots but that is not the same as killing other people and making it look as if this is the only answer to the problem.War is sick and I am sick of war movies.Please, they have now killed Star Trek because they turn "Enterprise" TV Series into a war story one episode after another and the last so called Star Trek Movie.

Star Trek has died because the people behind it could not see the beauty behind the previous Star Treks.So, in my opinion "Insurrection" was the last Star Trek of any kind and is the reminder of the original concept of Star Trek.

2-0 out of 5 stars 2.5 stars: Sort of enjoyable, but...
It's often been said that Star Trek producers and writers have the easiest and hardest jobs in the world simultaneously.Different people tune in, pop in a disc, buy a ticket, or otherwise view Star Trek for different reasons. There's some that show up for nostalgia of the old Shatner/Nimoy series, the optimism of Gene Roddenberry's vision, maybe because they've lost some optimism over the years. Others want to be challenged with new ideas, new philosophies and viewpoints. And some, probably more than any of us would like to admit, watch to see weird aliens and ships blowing up. So, although the first group will generally be happy no matter what, it is very difficult to make a Star Trek movie to appeal to the latter two at the same time. The ones that do, though (Wrath of Khan, First Contact), are the ones that are the most memorable.

Insurrection tries to split the difference. Although the ideas of imperialism and "might makes right" are examined, they are often maddeningly relegated to the background for another action sequence. The result is a film that never gains a steady intellectual footing, but also never really develops a compelling-enough story to be more than a light show, but it is a fairly good light show.

That being said, the movie opens perfectly. Data seemingly goes crazy, exposes a "duck-blind" to study a primitive people, then engages in a dangerous outer-atmosphere tango with Captain Picard, which is an excellent scene in nearly every way. It is funny, in an absurd way, but also invigorating, and after seeing its brilliance, you figure that the movie might just live up to its predecessor. Unfortunately, it turns out to be a bright spot in a movie filled with scenes that hit the wrong chord. The subplot about Data discovering his inner-child doesn't really distinguish itself from Data's myriad attempts to understand humanity in the series (does anyone else remember his beard?). The Son'a don't make great villains-they're cold, vengeful bastards, but they don't seem to realize it, like Khan did, so they can't have fun with it. Rather than being villains you love-to-hate, a. k. a. the best kind, they're just villains you hate. Picard gives a speech so self-righteous, he starts to sound like Janeway. Okay, using a pure moral system, the removal can't be justified, but moving 600 people to improve the quality of life for billions? Come on, at least think about it. Picard's much-older love interest subplot does have some juice, but the scenes about slowing down time are preposterous, just another unnecessary element in a sea of gratuitousness. And the ultimate nadir is when Riker pilots the U.S.S. Enterprise-E, an enormous and sophisticated 24th century starship, with what appeared to be a Thrustmaster joystick, circa 1997. (Speaking of beards that should be remembered...)

Much has been said of the humor in this movie, and some of it does hit its mark, but Worf's "aggressive tendencies" line and Counselor Troi's "boob" line are groaners, and in series that have generally gotten by on tense action and drama, going for laughs is a sign that you've run out of material. Check out Superman III for proof of this.

I suppose I shouldn't be too hard on these guys-the movie is a lot better than Nemesis, if only because it isn't obsessed with gloom. Jonathan Frakes once again sits behind the director's chair, and he tries to make this hodgepodge work, but unlike before, the performances are surprisingly unnuanced. Where before he was able to expertly juggle planet-side and ship action, keeping both storylines interesting, he now struggles to keep the action engaging on either front, all the while the movie begins to feel like a cookie-cutter action project-which is NOT a good thing. This movie came out only two years after First Contact, so I think that there wasn't enough time to develop it. I hope so, anyway, because in spite of a few scenes, this one ranks just above The Motion Picture and Star Trek V on my list of quality. If you want entertainment in a Trek movie, you might enjoy this one (emphasize might). If you are looking for something more, don't bother.

2-0 out of 5 stars Painfully Inconsequential
With the Star Trek film series at an apparent stand-still, it seems a good time to re-examine the various entries;In particular, the "odd-numbered curse".Star Trek: The Motion Picture holds up far better in its director's edition, and Star Trek III serves as a vital and emotional bridge in the original crew's saga.Then things get complicated.Shatner's The Final Frontier is an undisputed failure, but one with noble ideas and containing a number of nice character moments (i.e. Dr. McCoy's flashback), and Generations, while squandering a grand opportunity, is still fun viewing.Which brings us to Star Trek: Insurrection, which is the only one beyond any redemption. And this is because it has no ambition whatsoever.While the creative staff expressed a desire to craft a more light-hearted adventure, why do it with a story that seeks to create parallels with the forced exile of Native Americans?The action pales in comparison to First Contact, and the laugh count is non-existent compared to The Voyage Home.And both of those films managed to have a good deal of heart.Heart has been a variable factor in Star Trek films, built largely upon the strength of a particular entry's guest stars.First Contact had three knock-outs in the form of James Cromwell, Alfre Woodard, and Alice Krige.Following up that, Insurrection boasts Donna Murphy, who is less engaged in the proceedings than Carrie Fisher in Return of the Jedi, F. Murray Abraham, who makes us yearn for Last Action Hero, and Anthony Zerbe, who would fare better if he donned sunglasses and a black robe.All fine actors, all incapable of infusing energy into a script where nothing compelling exists.I read a review that called this "Star Trek: Save The Hippie Commune".Not far off.So check this out for completeness sake, and try to find some moments to enjoy (Geordi watching the sunrise).The good thing to be said here is that Insurrection inflicts no irreparable damage on the series or crew.That would come with the following entry, that would violate the sanctity of even the even-numbered Treks.

5-0 out of 5 stars Good movie... 5 stars for the extras!!!
Ok, sure, we all know this movie isn't as good as First Contact or Nemesis, but its a good movie with a good story to tell.. Its very light hearted and not as dark and scary as Nemesis and First Contact.. Overall, a good movie! A must have collection for all Star Trek fans!

Here are the extras that will be in this 2-disc DVD set:

Disc 1

The movie, presented in widescreen and enhanced for 16:9 TVs. Audio options include: Dolby Digital 5.1, DTS 5.1, and French Dolby Surround.
Text Commentary by Michael Okuda and Denise Okuda.

Disc 2

Production
It Takes a Village
Location, Location, Location
The Art of "Insurrection"
Anatomy of a Stunt
The Story of "Insurrection"
Making "Insurrection"
Director's Notebook
The Star Trek Universe
Westmore's Aliens
Star Trek's Beautiful Alien Women

Creating the Illusion
Behind-the-scenes footage of sequences filled with action and visual effects
Shuttle Chase
The Drones
The Duck Blind

Deleted Scenes
Ru'afo's Facelift
Working Lunch
Flirting
The Kiss
Status: Precarious
Disabling the Injector
Alternate Ending

Archives
Storyboards
Photo Gallery

Advertising
Teaser Trailer
Theatrical Trailer
Original Promotional Featurette
Borg Invasion 4-D Trailer

4-0 out of 5 stars most like Roddneberry Trek
Fans like to bash this film as well as Trek 5, Shatner's directoral opus. However, it seems to me that both this one and 5 are much MUCH more like classic Trek story telling that Roddenberry liked so much.

Sure, this is no FIRST CONTACT, but we already have one of those. this is a more thoughtful and human trek story, and one well-directed, with some of the nicest looking effects we've seen. The cast is in top form and having fun. And like the original cast in 4, when they are having fun, so does the audience.

Check this out with an open mind. And an open disregard for the rabid so-called uber fans who casually bash this movie. ... Read more


22. Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory / The Wizard of Oz
list price: $29.90
our price: $24.52
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Asin: B0002Q9WCY
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 4240
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Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory (Widescreen 30th Anniversary Edition)
Having proven itself as a favorite film of children around the world, Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory is every bit as entertaining now as it was when originally released in 1971. There's a timeless appeal to Roald Dahl's classic children's novel, which was playfully preserved in this charming musical, from the colorful carnival-like splendor of its production design to the infectious melody of the "Oompah-Loompah" songs that punctuate the story. Who can forget those diminutive Oompah-Loompah workers who recite rhyming parental warnings ("Oompah-Loompah, doopity do...") whenever some mischievous child has disobeyed Willy Wonka's orders to remain orderly? Oh, but we're getting ahead of ourselves ... it's really the story of the impoverished Charlie Bucket, who, along with four other kids and their parental guests, wins a coveted golden ticket to enter the fantastic realm of Wonka's mysterious confectionery. After the other kids have proven themselves to be irresponsible brats, it's Charlie who impresses Wonka and wins a reward beyond his wildest dreams. But before that, the tour of Wonka's factory provides a dazzling parade of delights, and with Gene Wilder giving a brilliant performance as the eccentric candyman, Wonka gains an edge of menace and madness that nicely counterbalances the movie's sentimental sweetness. It's that willingness to risk a darker tone--to show that even a wonderland like Wonka's can be a weird and dangerous place if you're a bad kid--that makes this an enduring family classic.

The Wizard of Oz
When it was released during Hollywood's golden year of 1939, The Wizard of Oz didn't start out as the perennial classic it has since become. The film did respectable business, but it wasn't until its debut on television that this family favorite saw its popularity soar. And while Oz's TV broadcasts are now controlled by media mogul Ted Turner (who owns the rights), the advent of home video has made this lively musical a mainstay in the staple diet of great American films. Young Dorothy Gale (Judy Garland), her dog, Toto, and her three companions on the yellow brick road to Oz--the Tin Man (Jack Haley), the Cowardly Lion (Bert Lahr), and the Scarecrow (Ray Bolger)--have become pop-culture icons and central figures in the legacy of fantasy for children. As the Wicked Witch who covets Dorothy's enchanted ruby slippers, Margaret Hamilton has had the singular honor of scaring the wits out of children for more than six decades. The film's still as fresh, frightening, and funny as it was when first released. It may take some liberal detours from the original story by L. Frank Baum, but it's loyal to the Baum legacy while charting its own course as a spectacular film. Shot in glorious Technicolor, befitting its dynamic production design (Munchkinland alone is a psychedelic explosion of color and decor), The Wizard of Oz may not appeal to every taste as the years go by, but it's required viewing for kids of all ages. --Jeff Shannon ... Read more


23. Seven (New Line Platinum Series)
Director: David Fincher
list price: $26.99
our price: $20.24
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Asin: B000050FEN
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 1191
Average Customer Review: 4.38 out of 5 stars
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Description

A retiring cop and his replacement track a psychotic killer who's using the seven deadly sins as a guide. Starring Brad Pitt, Morgan Freeman and Gwyneth Paltrow. ... Read more

Reviews (453)

5-0 out of 5 stars A worthy addition to DVD Format
I love DVD's! Not only is the format superior to VHS, but it allows me to enjoy movies on multiple levels. Now, in the spirit of the Criterion Collection, we have 'SE7EN - New Line Platinum Series Edition' added to the ever expanding library of DVD's to choose from. (If you have not heard of the Criterion Collection, please search for titles that include this designation - you will not be disapointed!) Seven is a great film with superb writing, acting, direction, the whole shebang and I am not going to bore you with those details. This review centers entirely on the Platinum DVD Release - and I can honestly say that it is VERY worth the money you spend on it. The commentary by David Fincher is awesome, and the commentaries by Morgan Freeman and Brad Pitt expand the understanding of their characters. Beyond this, the professionals who work behind the scenes have their two cents to share with you as well, and they are quite informative. Exlporing the Title Sequence is invigorating, as are the animated story boards. But the true value of this DVD is in the animated Notebook of John Doe's writings. Talk about a glimpse into the mouth of madness! It illustrates the mind of the killer, played marvelously by Kevin Spacey, and blows your mind. Talk about over the top DVD extras! This two disk set will keep you busy for quite a while, and I highly recommend it.

5-0 out of 5 stars Brilliant...and Disturbing.
I wish more movies like Se7en were made, and not because I'm into only creepy, unsettling films. Se7en simply doesn't pull any punches. The excellent characters, script, music, and atmosphere all work together to create the perfect canvas to paint this brutal tale of a serial killer that tortures and kills specific people in accordance with the seven deadly sins. Everything in Se7en has been tweaked to perfection. The movie captures your attention so completely that you can't look away, even at some of the truly morbid scenes. And let's not forget the acting! Brad Pitt, Morgan Freeman, Gwyneth Paltrow, and Kevin Spacey are all simply outstanding. Every word they utter seems real, unlike most Hollywood films where the characters are contrived and simply not believeable. The ending is shocking and depressing, more than equaling the rest of the film.

As if Se7en wasn't awesome enough, the DVD is simply loaded!! This is one of those rare cases when a movie DESERVES to be stocked full of extras! Obviously, this movie is not for the squeamish or weak of heart, but anyone who can handle this kind of a movie will discover one of the best films of the 90's.

5-0 out of 5 stars Morgan Freeman Is A Genius....
Robin Williams...Russell Crowe...Marisa Tomei...Angelina Jolie...Cher...How come these "actors"(& I use the term lightly)have an Oscar & Freeman doesn't? Between SE7EN & NURSE BETTY, 2 of the best performances of all time, there is something seriously wrong.. Watch this powerful film with a lead performance to match to cure any doubts...........

5-0 out of 5 stars The Best of it's Kind
A series of freak murders. A detective ready to retire and a new detective make this film one of the best in the drama genre. Will keep you on your feet till the very end. A very similar idea as other inteligent murder mystery thrillers like "Kiss the Girls" and "The Bone Collector" but this is the best of the lot.

1-0 out of 5 stars Terrible movie
I'm obviously in a minority here. But IMO the movie just sucked. The thing that irritated me throughout the movie was the darkness and by that I mean the absense of light. The lighting is artificially dimmed for effect and it just doesn't work. Nobody works and lives in such poor light. The black and white film noirs work beautifully, but this movie seems stage-managed. Amongst contemporary movies, the lighting in "Dark City" was very natural and fit in well with the theme of the movie. This is a one gimmick movie and it got old within the first 5 minutes. I count this, along with "Absolute Power" and "Behind Enemy Lines" as amongst the worst 10 movies I have seen. ... Read more


24. Local Hero
Director: Bill Forsyth
list price: $9.97
our price: $9.97
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 6305558205
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 1865
Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (125)

5-0 out of 5 stars Personal Best -robthenob@hotmail.com
In 1995 I was up in Scotland with five of my best friends whom had literally come from the four corners of the earth for the occasion. We travelled around the beautiful country, camping where we could and generally enjoying our freedom and youth. One particular spot that we stayed at was on the North West coast of Scotland, on a small, remote peninsula next to a white sanded beach with a view towards the Isles of Muck and Rum. After being there for a couple of days, we were told by a passing local that the beach was the very one that Local Hero was filmed on, and the peninsula where we had been camped for the past two days is where the church in the film was situated (it was apparently a set, made around an old house that still exists). At this point I had not seen the movie but knew the soundtrack by Mark Knopfler very well. The holiday I had that year was without a doubt one of the best I've ever had. Two years later on returning to NZ, I watched Local Hero with tears in my eyes, I couldn't believe that my favourite place in all the world was captured on an exceptionally beautiful, quirky, strangely romantic, and intelligent film. Overall I think that the general gist of the film is one of awakening our senses to the simple things in life, just like MacIntyre did on arriving at that small coastal village. We all need, at some point in our lives, to escape the hum-drum of every day life and awaken ourselves to the real life outside of our own. It is a wonderful, gentle film that will always be a part of me. P.S. I have omitted the exact name and location so that it is not overrun with tourists, but if you really want to know, send me an E-mail.

5-0 out of 5 stars One of my all-time favorites!
I am dating myself woefully, but I remember seeing this film when it came out in theatres. I trekked some distance (via bus) down to some theatre in Hollywood (I'm from another part of L.A.) because it wasn't showing anywhere nearby. I wanted to see it *that* bad. And I certainly wasn't disappointed.

When I finally got a DVD player, one of the first DVDs I got was "Local Hero". It's definitely on my "must-have" list.

The story is simple -- materialistic Peter Reigert is sent to a small Scottish village to try to negotiate a land deal for his rich, eccentric boss (Burt Lancaster, who is outstanding). He arrives in Scotland as a guy who is only obsessed with business deals, his car, and his posessions back in Texas, but soon he learns there are more important things in life. The townsfolk are absolutely wonderful, all in their own unique, eclectic way. Denis Lawson particularly shines as "jack of all trades" who holds several positions in the community, including innkeeper.

The oddness and beauty of this film takes time to unfold, and it is best just to sit back and watch it happen. Everyone seems to have a story, everyone is eccentric in some way. I especially loved Burt Lancaster and his interaction with his "therapist", who takes the job *far* too seriously. Lancaster plays one of the most likeable and unique characters onscreen. Reigert too, is endearing. He so wants to be "normal" that he can't even admit that he might use a shampoo for dry or greasy hair. "Normal. EXTRA normal.", he says, when asked what kind of shampoo he needs. What an uptight guy he seems at first, but he soon mends his ways.

The score by Mark Knopfler is among one of my favorites too. I can play it and it brings back the whole atmosphere and mood of this film. The musical piece played at the end of the movie is heart-wrenching and brings back the sweetness of the end of this fine movie every time I hear it.

Director Bill Forsythe created an absolute gem in this movie. A must-have in *every* film collection. Absolutely first-rate.

1-0 out of 5 stars difference of opinion
This is one of those movies that you watch and finally when the credits roll you kick yourself for wasting the time and effort to do so.
The bomb dropping jets? The guy on the motorcycle? The briefly hit on relationship between Mac and the other guy's wife? The marine biologist turning into a mermaid? Please, some one explain the relivance.
The ending seemed as though the writer needed a quick way out of a poorly written movie. I'll bet Burt Lancaster turns in his grave (is he dead?-if he isn't he should be after making this dud) every time some one waist their time trying to watch this movie.
The main reason I watched the movie was because of the soundtrack that was written by Marc Knopfler-great music, terrible movie.

5-0 out of 5 stars Where's Bill Forsythe when we need him?
This movie really did inspire me. I got up the nerve to make a solo trip around Ireland, England, Scotland and Wales.

The scenes, characters and sounds of this movie are simply unforgettable. For sure, it's a cold heart that won't come out speakin' with a Scots accent with a touch of Russia.

5-0 out of 5 stars You can go home again.
A very charming movie that bears up well under repeated viewings. Bill Forsyth has done so many good movies over the years, but I think this remains his best. Certainly, it is the closest to home, as he beautifully plays off the American-Scotland theme and the sense of misplaced identity.

Peter Riegert is great as Mac, a representative of a large Houston oil company who has been chosen to close a deal on a harbor village in the north of Scotland, because of his presumed Scottish ancestry. Turns out Mac is of Hungarian, not Scottish descent, as his parents thought MacIntyre was an American name. Nevertheless, Mac soon finds himself adapting to the rugged North Sea coast, picking seashells from the tidal pools and adopting a rabbit his driver had inadvertantly hit on the road.

Forsyth introduces the viewer to a wonderfully eccentric cast of characters in the small village, led by the amicable Gordon Urquhart, mayor, innkeeper, accountant and jack of all trades. Mac finds himself falling in love with Gordon's wife, but the playful romance is treated more in jest than in an attempt to foil the plot. It is in a grizzled beachcomber that we find the perfect foil to the land deal, which eventually brings the head of the oil commpany, Mr. Knox (played to perfection by Burt Lancaster) to Scotland.

You will fall in love with this movie, as I did, carried along by its charm and beautifully poignant moments. Forsyth doesn't miss a beat in this playful movie. ... Read more


25. Cloak & Dagger
Director: Richard Franklin
list price: $9.99
our price: $9.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0003JAONG
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 2093
Average Customer Review: 4.68 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (19)

5-0 out of 5 stars Cloak & Dagger-Henry Thomas-(1986)
When a 11-year-old boy(Henry Thomas-E.T.-The Extra Terrestrial) witnesses a murder and a strange doctor gives the boy a video game cartilage, a group of spies want the disk back and try to kil the boy,tough the game cartilage "cloak & dagger" has very important goverment plans in it.With the help of a friend, Kim Gardner(Christina Nigra), and his imaginary pal Jack Flack(Dabney Coleman-Wargames) who plays two roles as Davey's father and Jack Flack.David G. Osborne(Henry Thomas) sets off with Kim,Jack Flack,and the spie's buddy(Micheal Murphy) with an adventure of their own with all the action and adventure.The film was filmed in San Antonio, Texas, on the riverwalk, S.A. airport,S.A. Mall, The Alamo, and S.A.'S biggest buissiness building.Watch cloak & dagger yull' love it, because it is my favorite movie.

mpaa rating :pg, for violence.

Also recommended : Mercury Rising-(action/adventure), The Client-(drama), FROM:MCA Universal Pictures,

Comments & Questions? Please mail to : Chad Nicholson 2203 Apricot Glen Austin, TX 78746

4-0 out of 5 stars Spy Kid
"Cloak & Dagger" is one of those movies that was clearly made for the sole purpose of the audience to have fun. And on that level, it succeeds perfectly. This is a great movie to put in one night when you just want to relax, have fun, and not have to use your brain to understand the movie.

Henry Thomas plays Davey Osborne, a kid whose whole world revolves around his spy toys. He even has an imaginary friend, super-spy Jack Flack, who assists Davey on all of his assignments. One day, Davey witnesses a real murder. Before the victim dies, he hands Davey a Cloak & Dagger video game and gives him a number that Davey believes to be the score to beat to find out its secret. Unfortunately for Davey, the body is gone by the time he gets back with the cops and no one believes him. Soon, Davey is playing spy for real with the help of his imaginary friend, Jack.

The movie is fairly predictable, but is fun and engaging nonetheless. The villians are over the top, the imaginary friend is full of himself, and the heroes are kids who have no one else to turn to.

As I said before, this is a great movie to plug in after a hard day at work when all you want to do is unwind.

5-0 out of 5 stars When the game becomes reality
Surprisingly, the reason why the boy who plays Davey Osbourne on this highly underrated kids movie may look familiar because he was Elliot on the movie E.T. Filming right where he was from, Henry Thomas was given the choice to film in San Antonio, taking that oppurtunity to be making a film in his own back yard. Maybe it was for the better considering it was made very well with good acting to it.
Davey just wants to have a little fun while the summer is still at large. His disciplining father (Dabney Coleman) doesn't exactly help to stimulate his imagination either. the only one who seems to understand him is his imaginary friend Jack Flack (also Dabney Coleman) who came right out of a video game to give Davey a little company. But when Davey and his friend Kim (Christina Nigra) are out to do a little errand when Davey witnesses a murder, and may have just escaped one himself, leaving with a mysterious video cartriage that the murdered man gave him. It is soon clear that someone else after the video game, and will stop at nothing to get it. As they chase after him for the seemingly innocent tape, Davey realizes he, and Kim are stuck with only one choice, and that's to run for their lives and figure out what is so important about this game to where people would as high as murder to get it.
This should really come out on DVD like others have suggested. I'll still wait for it, but until that time, Jack Flack will always escape.

4-0 out of 5 stars Henry Thomas's best after E.T. waiting for DVD hopefully
I love this movie for Nostalgic reasons plus I used to play the actual game "Cloak & Dagger" at my local arcade and sometimes at the candy store.
Rented it back in the summer of '84 at my local video store
and me and my younger brother loved it and watched it tons of times.
It's the second BEST film Henry Thomas has ever done of course next to E.T.
He was a great child actor: cute, and never over acted, and when he cried it was always believable and that's why E.T. went on to become what it is now.
Well anyways regarding the movie it's a great family film with adventure,action,and a bit of mystery and suspense all rolled up into one. I just purchased it recently on VHS (can't seem to know why no DVD out yet?) I give it 4 stars...for the one reason being that the time factor in the movie concerning the bomb in Kim's walking talkie...everytime Davey (Henry Thomas)
looked up in worry to see if the time was ticking down to the bomb blowing up, time would stand still in terms of it'll be on 11:45pm for like 5 minutes in between him busting shots at bad guys, talking to "Jack Flack" his imaginary mentor spy friend, running, talking on the pay phone, trying to find a cab (with no money in his name) to get to the airport in time, going through the detectors, getting kidnapped by the old folks, and getting on the plane....all this was done in like10 minutes (in the movie) I looked at my watch and it was over 15-20 minutes that had passed!
But that is minor, I am a hard person to please when it comes to movies (at least nowadays movies) and I pretty much bomb most of the movies I see in my reviews but this a rare gem that I HIGHLY recommend.

4-0 out of 5 stars Please Release This On DVD!
As a teenager in the 80's I watched Cloak and Dagger on HBO with my niece and nephew and we all liked the movie and watched it several times. Dabney Coleman and Henry Thomas were both great in this fun movie and I'm waiting for it to be released on DVD! ... Read more


26. Full House - The Complete First Season
Director: Don Van Atta, John Tracy (II), Howard Storm, Steve Zuckerman, Bill Petty, Peter Baldwin, Russ Petranto, Tom Rickard, Joel Zwick, Jack Shea (III), James O'Keefe, John Bowab, Jeff Franklin, Richard Correll, Bill Foster (IV), Lee Shallat Chemel
list price: $29.98
our price: $20.99
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Asin: B0006N2F0E
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 1909
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27. 8 1/2 - Criterion Collection
Director: Federico Fellini
list price: $39.95
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Asin: B00005QAPH
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 1745
Average Customer Review: 4.62 out of 5 stars
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Description

One of the greatest films about film ever made, Federico Fellini's 8 1/2 (Otto e Mezzo) turns one man's artistic crisis into a grand epic of the cinema. Guido Anselmi (Marcello Mastroianni) is a director whose film-and life-is collapsing around him. An early working title for the film was La Bella Confusione (The Beautiful Confusion), and Fellini's masterpiece is exactly that: a shimmering dream, a circus, and a magic act. The Criterion Collection is proud to present the 1963 Academy Award® winner for Best Foreign-Language Film-one of the most written about, talked about, and imitated movies of all time-in a beautifully restored new digital transfer. Disc two features Fellini's rarely seen first film for television, Fellini: A Director's Notebook (1969). Produced by Peter Goldfarb, this imagined documentary of Fellini is a kaleidoscope of unfinished projects, all of which provide a fascinating and candid window into the director's unique and creative process. ... Read more

Reviews (78)

5-0 out of 5 stars We invent ourselves endlessly!
1. Federico Fellini. Sensitive, vulgar - il maestro.
2. Saraghina - beauty and repulsion just a few jiggles away.
3. Sandra Milo is dimples dangerous and blessed.
4. Marcello M. as Guido Enselmi, loveable hypocrite.
5. Guido's father moaning about his burial arrangements.
6. A little fantasy in reality or a little reality in fantasy.
7. Claudia Cardinale carrying mineral water.
8. Crappy musical inspired by film. How many movies claim that honor?
1/2. The spaceship - masculinity/identity in progress of going up or coming down?

The "close but no cigar" portion of the list:
Terry Gilliam carries on about how scenes in this movie have influenced his career (see no.2); Nino Rota's music, brilliant as always, probably should have been included in my top eight list; DVD extras - especially lost gem A DIRECTOR'S NOTEBOOK; boring commentary; when this picture first opened in Italy, the anticipation was compared to the excitement over a new Rossini work in his time; Fellini was like a fish in water when it comes to film design and invention - a true master; It moves at its own pace and logic, critics be damned; Fellini was brilliant because the people who worked on his films were equally brilliant - the best in their respective fields; the whip-master fantasy, I can actually agree with the impulse behind that one; it's an epic about one man's over-sized ego - what a wonderful subject to create a brilliant film about! The perfect movie for a century that has been incredibly affected/effected by the ideas purported by the science of psychology. Fellini had stated he was a great admirer of Carl Jung's work, and it is no surprise he would take up that banner.

If you can, check out CITY OF WOMEN - another film by Fellini that works on a similar logic, but takes it several steps beyond what he did with 8 1/2. Ciao!

5-0 out of 5 stars Life is our greatest invention!
1. Federico Fellini. Sensitive, vulgar - il maestro.
2. Saraghina - beauty and repulsion just a few jiggles away.
3. Sandra Milo is dimples dangerous and blessed.
4. Marcello M. as Guido Enselmi, loveable hypocrite.
5. Guido's father moaning about his burial arrangements.
6. A little fantasy in reality or a little reality in fantasy.
7. Claudia Cardinale carrying mineral water.
8. Crappy musical inspired by film. How many movies claim that honor?
1/2. The spaceship - masculinity/identity in progress of going up or coming down?

The "close but no cigar" portion of the list:
Terry Gilliam carries on about how scenes in this movie have influenced his career (see no.2); Nino Rota's music, brilliant as always, probably should have been included in my top eight list; DVD extras - especially lost gem A DIRECTOR'S NOTEBOOK; boring commentary; when this picture first opened in Italy, the anticipation was compared to the excitement over a new Rossini work in his time; Fellini was like a fish in water when it comes to film design and invention - a true master; It moves at its own pace and logic, critics be damned; Fellini was brilliant because the people who worked on his films were equally brilliant - the best in their respective fields; the whip-master fantasy, I can actually agree with the impulse behind that one; it's an epic about one man's over-sized ego - what a wonderful subject to create a brilliant film about! The perfect movie for a century that has been incredibly affected/effected by the ideas purported by the science of psychology. Fellini had stated he was a great admirer of Carl Jung's work, and it is no surprise he would take up that banner.

If you can, check out CITY OF WOMEN - another film by Fellini that works on a similar logic, but takes it several steps beyond what he did with 8 1/2. Ciao!

3-0 out of 5 stars A CONTROVERSIAL MOVIE.
Frequently, the name or label "Art film" is given to a movie that presents innovative techniques, an experimental narrative, abstract and ambiguous characters, complex dialogues...and slow pace, with complicated scenes, so complicated that the audience doesn't quite know what's happening, sure you can say a theory or what you think might be happening, but in the "Art films" sometimes even the director can't give an accurate explanation. Anyway, since "8 ½" presents all those elements, "8 ½" is an art film.

Federico Fellini's cinema is one of the most mysterious and influent styles at the same time, modern filmmakers such as David Lynch owe a lot to the italian director. With "8 ½" happens something very interesting, there are a lot of scenes that are almost incomprehensible, but they are very interesting to see, because since the movie offers few explanations, the audience must be thinking most of the time, trying to solve the puzzle, so "8 ½" requires an active audience.

The cast is very good, the obvious mentions are Marcello Mastroianni and the gorgeous actress Claudia Cardinale. "8 ½" presents some of Fellini's trademarks: there are a lot of surreal scenes that look like a complicated Dream, or a Nightmare if you wish. The use of the camera is very artistic and groundbreaking. And the pace is slow.

The thing with the "Art cinema" is that for some, it's the only way of cinema that really counts, and for others the art cinema is just a pretentious way to call a slow and boring movie. I choose not to be in any of those extremes, I rather be in the middle because to me "8 ½" is a very, very interesting movie, worthy of study and analysis, but sincerely I think that Fellini did better movies, like "La Strada" or "La Dolce Vita".

Anyway, "8 ½" definitely is not for fans of the "American Pie" trilogy or the Adam Sandler's comedies. "8 ½" is for lovers of the cinema in its more artistic expression.

5-0 out of 5 stars Fellini's fragmented masterpiece of an internal crisis...
The prominent film director Guido (Marcello Mastroianni) finds himself overworked, harassed, and fatigued in all aspect of being. Guido is sent to a health spa where he is supposed to recover from his stressful life, but instead is continuously pursued by people around him, by his past, and by his conscious. The people around Guido are either dependent on him, desire his company, or merely try to advertise themselves in his presence. In order to cope with a large number of people Guido has developed a social dance where he is able to circumvent or approach the individuals of his choosing. This dance is also Guido's way of dealing with life and its complications, which affects him physically, psychologically, and socially.

8½ fragmentally displays Guido's life as he dances between reality, dreams, and memories in the developmental stage of a film production. This cerebral dance helps him to avoid what is deemed as uncomfortable as he escapes into his memories where he can find some joy and peace. However, Guido often reminds himself of how his past sometimes plagues him as he can recollect deep memories of discomfort and guilt. These negative emotions lead Guido into an internal crisis where he struggles with his decisions in the light of moral judgment that is heavily weighted by his Catholic upbringing. Despite the internal crisis, the dance continuous as Guido is compelled to flee his painful memories by seeking company outside of his marriage as he seeks self-affirmation when he is alone. The cheating provokes further guilt which urges Guido to remain dancing as he escapes into a dream world where he attempts to unify memories with the present where his consciousness sets the rules. But to Guido's dismay he finds the dreams forcing him back into reality as his dreams rebel against himself. This is due to his conflicting ideas that are simultaneously rejected and approved of in order to find temporary happiness and please those around him. In essence, it is Guido's denial of his own lies that is the root to his guilt and unhappiness.

Fellini's 8½ is a cinematic masterpiece, which encourages analytical and artistic thinking as it dives into a dense fabric of inventive imagery. Vividly Fellini paints Guido's moral crisis onto the silver screen, which offers a surreal cinematic experience as it drifts between reality and dreams. In addition, 8½ shows Fellini's profound understanding of human psychology, which possibly could have been based on himself. The fragmented story line enhances the visual feeling of the stress that Mastroianni's character experiences as well as developing a deep understanding for his mind. The opening shot where Guido dreams of being enclosed in a smoldering car stuck in traffic displays Fellini's true cinematic genius as he develops an image of panic, anxiety, and fear. This visualization is something that can be discovered in every film that Fellini has directed as well as his trademark of having a circus-like atmosphere. 8½ has everything of what makes it a Fellini film, which offers a unique experience that could only have been accomplished by a true cinematic artist.

5-0 out of 5 stars Best Movie About the Artist
I saw 8 ½ (1963) for the first time on South Street in Philadelphia at the old TLA theatre. I was in my mid-twenties and liked the big-breasted women. Saw the movie again yesterday at the Colonial in Phoenixville, PA, a wonderfully restored small town theatre, and reentered the world of the great director Federico Fellini. The cast consisted of Marcello Mastroianni (mid life crisis of the great director), Claudia Cardinale (the perfect woman), Sandra Milo (the chesty but dim lover) and Anouk Aimée (the ordinary wife he cheats on).For Fellini, 8 ½ continued a trend away from the realism of his early movies to a surrealistic view of his own life. The film has a simple premise. The great director has no idea what his next movie is about, while his producer and film company wait for Mastroianni to tell them what the movie is about. It does not help that Mastroianni falls in love with every woman in the cast and every woman he ever knew. The famous harem scene is near the end of the movie, where all the women in his life await his every whim. The older ones get banished upstairs. When the women revolt, he gets his whip and regains order. The women love him again. Oh, irony, but in Surrealism, Freud reigns supreme and dreams are a wish. I rate 8 ½ one of ten best movies ever made. ... Read more


28. The Quiet Man (Collector's Edition)
Director: John Ford
list price: $14.98
our price: $11.24
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Asin: B00006JMRD
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 359
Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (136)

5-0 out of 5 stars John Ford's gentle and loving salute to Ireland.......
From all reports "The Quiet Man" was a very personal and passionate undertaking from director John Ford, and his company of players (most of Irish ancestry)....and what sweet fruit their passion bore...

This is a film of such warmth, tenderness, humour and beauty that it just sparkles from beginning to end.

Irish-born, American boxer Sean Thornton (John Wayne) returns to his place of birth after accidently killing another man in the ring. Seeking to find peace and happiness in the lush green country side, Sean is enraptured with the fiery Mary Kate Danaher (Maureen O'Hara in a wonderful performance) but incurs the wrath of her bully of a brother Red Will Danaher (Victor McLaglen) because of Thornton's purchase of local land. Failing to abide by the customs of Irish courtship as advised by resident matchmaker Michaleen Flynn (Barry Fitzgerald) and Father Peter Lonergan (Ward Bond)...it's not long before the whole county is in a spin about this big Yank in their midst !!

Amidst the lopsided courtship and Red Will's refusal to pay the dowry, Thornton & Danaher square off in what must be the most entertaining and longest on screen fights in cinema history...much to the amusement of the entire town that turned out to watch !!

"The Quiet Man" is such a wonderfully enchanting film, that it is as enjoyable for all ages today, as it was nearly 50 years ago. Truly, a film for those young at heart and those who can appreciate such a warm hearted and lovingly prepared ode to the magic of Ireland.

5-0 out of 5 stars A Movie You'll Watch Over And Over
A true masterpiece, this movie captures the heart and soul of Ireland. That said, not only the Irish will love it. It tells the story of an American, coming home to his mother's beloved Irland. There he meets and falls in love with a beautiful colleen, only to find that her brother is against the affair and basically, out to get him. Shot on location in Ireland, the view is gorgeous, and the plot has everything from exciting fights to tender love scenes. ( My favourite scene is their famous first kiss, when he kisses her in the storm and then she slaps him. Btw, Maureen O'Hara fractured her wrist doing that!)

"The Quiet Man" was John Ford's favourite film, and also his most personal one. He cast his favourite actors in it, and it shows. John wayne is just great -whoever thinks he only played himself in every role should see his performance here. For his love interest we have Ford's kind of a woman, the breathtakingly beautiful Maureen O'Hara.She gives a magnificent performance as Mary Kate, and in my opinion should have won the Oscar for it. (She Wasn't even nominated!) Sparks flew when this couple met on screen, and the result is out there for you to witness.

Don't wait till the next St. Patrick's Day -see this film now. I promise you won't regret it.

4-0 out of 5 stars A romance almost out of time and place - wonderful cast
Anyway, the story is an idyll that is really out of time and place. Apparently it takes place in the early 20th century in Ireland. It seems to be after the Irish Revolution, but before the First World War. I say before the war because the movie never references the awful loss of life that traumatized every European nation that experienced it. Any later than that and you would wonder where the planes and cars would be.

It is a good love story, but the whole concept of dowry and the stubborn character shown by the whole Danaher clan would be mysterious to the younger American generation, as would the purpose of a matchmaker and the formal courting rituals that the movie sends up.

John Wayne is quite fine in this role as is the whole cast. It is a very enjoyable film with a lot to recommend it for the family. It will certainly spark some discussion with the kids that might be helpful and broaden their cultural horizons.

5-0 out of 5 stars One of the great classics of world cinema
Everything about this film is first rate. The storyline, cast, the directing, the cinematography. You can't go wrong with this one.

1-0 out of 5 stars Restored ? Huh !
I'm going to keep this short. The Quiet Man is a classic, so why treat it like crap. I have VHS copies of old Disney Afternoon cartoons that are a million times better than this. The transfer is so bad I finally just messed with the color on my set and decided it would be better in black and white.
Theatrical Trailers? That's what the box says, but there are only three "trailers" on the disc, and none are theatrical. they are all commercials for other Artisan discs, which makes no sense as anyone who sees what a terrible job they did to this classic will be very wary before they ever pick up another Artisan disc. Can you imagine the outcry if they did this to Wizard of Oz or any ohter film classics. ... Read more


29. Fight Club (Single Disc Edition)
Director: David Fincher
list price: $19.98
our price: $14.99
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Asin: B000067J1H
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 552
Average Customer Review: 4.53 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (1184)

5-0 out of 5 stars This Movie is Why "Professional" Critics Must Go
I didn't see this movie in the theaters because it had gotten very mixed reviews from the so-called professional movie reviewers. But, when it hit the local vidoe store, I thought I would give it a try. WOW, what a kick in the teeth, interesting, and fast moving journey into one man's mind. The path this movie takes is fantastic.

Norton and Pitt are perfectly cast, and supported by a crew of fight club members that make for a well-acted show. Meatloaf, Ed Gil, Jared Leto, et. al. are great in support as the members/followers of the leads. Helena Bonham Carter has the only real female role in this film and is perfectly cast. But as much as the acting, this movie is made by the story. Unconventional, with a great twist at the end, the whole movie kept me on the edge of my seat. As with many great movies, it is hard to classify the genre (action, comedy, drama), as there is a sampling of all in this film. In the end, I would just classify this as a great film.

Much was made of the violence of this movie when it first hit the theaters. Those critics overstated the case. There is blood and violence in the movie, but it is not excessive and it serves the plot well.

If you missed this in the theater, see it now. If you saw it once, see it again. I will.

5-0 out of 5 stars Fight Club-another reason to own a DVD player.
If any DVD was produced on the same level as the Terminator 2 Ultimate Edition and the Toy Story 3-Disc box set, it is this DVD. Fight Club is not only a VERY well produced DVD, but the supplemental material will keep you busy for LITERALLY hours. You will finally have a reason to 'break in' that angle button on your remote. As a story, Fight Club takes a more cerebral approach to ones thought processes. Containing many cool effects, Fight Club may make the average movie viewer pop a few Excedrins while trying to figure out the point of the film. While many may finish the movie in total confusion, mostly everyone will agree that Fight Club is a unique movie experience. When I received the DVD package, I was instantly impressed with the graphic design of the outer package, the discs themselves and the booklet that is included. Initially, this DVD comes off as a "special edition" rather then a simple "movie release on DVD". Whoever created the graphics on the cover and throughout the booklet has a very active imagination. Disc one has the film, disc two has the supplemental material. ** Pause the third FBI WARNING at the beginning of the disc....it is quite funny** Disc one offers you your usual "chapters" choices with 'moving' scenes (like The Matrix), audio setup for Dolby surround for both a 2 speaker setups and 5.1 setups in English and Spanish. This is also a THX certified DVD, so it includes a THX setup screen. Disc one also gives you the choice of several audio commentaries to listen to throughout the film, including David Fincher, Bradd Pitt, Ed Norton, Helena Bonham Carter, the novelist and the screenwriter, the Director of Photography, Visual Effects Supervisor and a couple of others. In a nutshell, you have a choice to listen to A LOT of people, a great addition to this DVD. Picture quality of Fight Club was incredible. Overall, the picture is moody and dark with beautiful blacks and wonderful color detail. It is beautifully photographed with incredible shadow detail and crystal clear highlights. Sound quality was equally impressive. Being THX certified, you can expect nothing less then awesome. Edward Nortons voice-over sounds very live, as though he's sitting right in front of you. The sound has beautiful detail, with stereo separation being impressively realistic and the music and dialogue recorded incredibly well. Surround detail is amazing with some scenes having deep bass that will make the neighbors call the cops. Disc two will stay in your DVD player for a long time. The supplemental material includes crew and cast information. behind the scenes of the production, the visual effects and on-location footage with commentaires and multiple angles.......WOW! Disc two also contains seven deleted scenes as well as trailers, TV spots, music videos, an interview with Edward Norton and a bunch of storyboards, visual effects stills, paintings and many other additions to keep your fingers happy on that remote. The Producers of this DVD should be applauded....not only is the picture and sound quality top-notch, but the graphical elements and the supplemental materials included are fantastic and incredibly entertaining. I highly recommend this DVD for those who enjoyed this movie in the theatre, who are curious about the film, or those simply interested in seeing what a superb DVD release is all about. Enjoy!

3-0 out of 5 stars Not bad, but...
OK, blend Matrix, Guy Richi, and Osama Bin Laden and you get a masterpiece? A funny comedy, not more. Fight Club is brilliant in the beginning with all that satire, but when it gets philosophical, I felt like I have seen this before.

5-0 out of 5 stars Famous Fight Club quote.
"F*** Martha Stewart. Martha's polishing the brass on the Titanic; it's all going down, man."

-- She just 5 months in prison and 5 months of home confinement. Isn't it wierd how much of this film has been almost prophetic?

5-0 out of 5 stars Outstanding commentaries
All the commentaries you could want, and they're all great. The actor's commentary is at least as entertaining as the film. ... Read more


30. The Searchers
Director: John Ford
list price: $14.97
our price: $11.23
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Asin: 6304696566
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 1171
Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com essential video

A favorite film of some of the world's greatest filmmakers, including Martin Scorsese and Steven Spielberg, John Ford's The Searchers has earned its place in the legacy of great American films for a variety of reasons. Perhaps most notably, it's the definitive role for John Wayne as an icon of the classic Western--the hero (or antihero) who must stand alone according to the unwritten code of the West. The story takes place in Texas in 1868; Wayne plays Ethan Edwards, a Confederate veteran who visits his brother and sister-in-law at their ranch and is horrified when they are killed by marauding Comanches. Ethan's search for a surviving niece (played by young Natalie Wood) becomes an all-consuming obsession. With the help of a family friend (Jeffrey Hunter) who is himself part Cherokee, Ethan hits the trail on a five-year quest for revenge. At the peak of his masterful talent, director Ford crafts this classic tale as an embittered examination of racism and blind hatred, provoking Wayne to give one of the best performances of his career. As with many of Ford's classic Westerns, The Searchers must contend with revisionism in its stereotypical treatment of "savage" Native Americans, and the film's visual beauty (the final shot is one of the great images in all of Western culture) is compromised by some uneven performances and stilted dialogue. Still, this is undeniably one of the greatest Westerns ever made. --Jeff Shannon ... Read more

Reviews (120)

5-0 out of 5 stars A classic western
The Searchers is considered by many to be one of the best westerns ever made, and I cannot disagree with them. The story follows the efforts of two men trying to track down a kidnapped girl from Comanches over the course of five years. The men tracking the tribe are a Confederate veteran and the girl's uncle and the other a family friend and also part Cherokee. The film is beautifully shot as all John Ford westerns are, which adds to the overall mood of the movie. There is a vastness to some scenes which show the futility of tracking down this girl after so many years. The Searchers is a classic that provided John Wayne with a role that was different from any other he had previously played.

John Wayne stars as Ethan Edwards, the Confederate veteran trying to track down his niece after his brother's family is slaughtered by a Comanche raiding party. He plays the role of the racist veteran to perfection. At times it is startling to see him in a role that differs so greatly from most other movies he had done. Jeffrey Hunter plays Martin Pawley, the Duke's partner in his search for the kidnapped girl. He plays a good sidekick to Wayne throughout since they have such differing personalities in the movie. Also starring are Natalie Wood, Ward Bond, Harry Carey JR, Patrick Wayne, Hank Worden, Ken Curtis and plenty of other Wayne stock actors. The DVD is good but could have been much better. You can view the movie in fullscreen or widescreen, with trailers included alongside four documentary shorts. A must have for western fans that is up there with Shane and The Wild Bunch as some of the greatest westerns of all time!

5-0 out of 5 stars John Wayne at his Western Best now on WideScreen DVD!
"The Searchers" (1956) Anamorphic Widescreen DVD version is one of the best classic westerns ever made! Ranked in the American Film Institute's (AFI) top 100 movies of the last 100 years (1998). Having the best Western Director, John Ford partnering up with his favorite cowboy star, John Wayne can only be the beginning of a grand movie. Adding Widescreen Technicolor, the colorful Panoramic Monument Valley - Utah (Ford's favorite western area to film), a fantastic musical score and top supporting cast leads us on one of the best filmed westerns ever!

Summary - Ethan Edwards (John Wayne) is returning home to his only Brother & his family. After he and a posse of Texas Rangers (Lead by Ward Bond) were decoyed away by distant marauding Indians. The actual Indian raid was on remaining defenseless families left behind. Ethan's returned to find his Brothers family massacured all but his youngest niece, Debbie (played by Lana (younger)& Natalie Wood (older). His vengence takes him on a 5 year journey to recover her. Wayne is brilliant and proves he is a great actor.

"The Searchers" is a powerful 2 hour emotional rollercoaster ride. This movie will leave you with more respect of John Wayne's ability to act, Director John Ford's genius to tell a very complex story. Leaving us forever with a Great Western Classic! Enjoy.

5-0 out of 5 stars Searchers!!
Ethan Edwards, (John Wayne), finds his way home after the civil war to his brothers homestead. Some cattle are rustled and he and a few men track them only to discover it's a Comanche trick to lure them away while they kill out the folks left behind which is Ethan's brother, wife, and kids. They arrive back too late, all are dead except Ethan's niece who was taken captive. Ethan sets out to find his niece accompanied by Martin Pauley, (Jeffrey Hunter), who Ethan found as a baby years earlier after another Indian raid. Ethan loved his brother's wife which is clear in the book by Lemay but very lightly alluded to in the film. This helps to explain his rage because everything he cared for in the world is gone. He will pursue the Comanche that have his niece until hell freezes over. Along the way he finds that he is still a human being. This film is widely considered the greatest western of all time and a favorite film of Martin Scorsese and Steven Spielberg if that means anything to you, I thought I would toss it in anyway.

3-0 out of 5 stars STILL SEARCHING FOR AN ADEQUATE TRANSFER
John Ford was a master craftsman of the American cinema. Though he dabbled in melodrama and action during his directorial career, his everlasting contribution to the movies remains in those galvanic distillations of the old west put forth by an unparalleled series of legendary films. "The Searchers" ranks among his most finely wrought and meticulously hand crafted projects. Indeed it seems to be the film in which the culmination of Ford's own commitment to the power, beauty and frailty of the western frontier tragically come together in a revisionist perspective that exposes both its grandeur and its flaws. The film stars the iconic John Wayne as Ethan Edwards - a strangely majestic antihero who vows bloody revenge after his cousin and family are slaughtered by marauding Comanches. But Ethan's search for his surviving niece (Natalie Wood) becomes a sinister and all-consuming obsession when he learns that she - having been abducted while still a child - has now adopted the ways of her captors and, at least in Ethan's mind, has become one of them. The film tackles racism in the form of Ethan's distrust of one time family friend (Jeffrey Hunter) who is part Cherokee and the sweep and spectacle of Death Valley has never been quite so poignantly captured on film.
THE TRANSFER: While Warner Home Video has made "The Searchers" available in anamorphic widescreen in a print that is light years ahead of anything the film has looked like before for the home film enthusiast, compared to more current DVD releases, the visual splendor of the transfer falls short of expectations. Though colors are rich there's something of a muddiness and lack of balance to them in many of the indoor scenes. Also, several scenes appear to be suffering slightly from color shrinkage, creating a slightly out of focus image quality that is distracting. Age related artifacts are present but do not distract so much as the digital anomalies of pixelization and edge enhancement which greatly plague the background information in most of the long shots. A slight shimmering is inherent in all of the scenes. Black and contrast levels can be solid at times, while sometimes appearing slightly pasty. Ditto for the unnatural flesh tones which are either overly pink or a ruddy orange. The audio has been remastered and delivers a nice expansive presentation which is in keeping with the vintage of the original sound elements.
EXTRAS: Not this time around. Sadly, this film deserves a documentary.
BOTTOM LINE: "The Searchers" is a masterful western, on par with "Stagecoach" and "High Noon". Definitely one to add to your film library.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Best Western Ever Made
This is the best Western ever made. There's simply too much to say about it here to do it justice. The imagery, John Wayne's character's growth, the comraderie between the "searchers", the supporting cast and the theme will make seeing this film worth the while of even those who "hate" Westerns. It's a classic, and purchasing it will be money well spent.

Enjoy. ... Read more


31. Hair
Director: Milos Forman
list price: $14.95
our price: $11.96
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Asin: 0792841638
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 1410
Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (65)

4-0 out of 5 stars Beautiful Score, Amazing Choreography
"Hair" boasts one of the most beautiful scores in Broadway history. While the film changes the plot, it keeps most of the songs and even adds some stunning dance numbers.

Set in the 60's, filmed in the late 70's, the film shows its age. Still the amazing score shines. Some of the best numbers include:

*the still popular "Age of Aquarius" and "Let the Sun Shine" both of which became anthems for an era.
*the haunting "Easy to Be Hard," sung by Cheryl Barnes with cutaways of a little boy that will break your heart
*"Good Morning Starshine" sung primarily by Beverly D'Angelo (the Mom in Chevy Chase's Vacation Movies!)
*"Hair" the title song performed by one of the lead singers of the band Chicago

Twyla Tharp, pre her major fame, choreographed much of the movie. It shows.

As for the plot, well it's thin and it has been changed from the play. An Oklahoma boy wanders into Central Park, a few days before he is to ship off to boot camp for Vietnam. He befriends some "hippies," led by Berger "Treat Williams" and falls in love with Sheila (Beverly D'Angelo), a debutante who ride her horse through Central Park. It's all an excuse for the songs-HOWEVER, the final scenes-including one of hundreds of soldiers marching into a plane heading to Vietanm-turn darker and are far more thought provoking.
I would recommend this movie to those individuals who crave 60's entertainment in any form. Also-if you enjoyed "Moulin Rouge," you probably will like this movie.

4-0 out of 5 stars Hair: Revisiting the Age of Aquarius...
Ever since it opened off-Broadway in 1967, the Tribal Love Rock Musical "Hair" has been spreading it's message of love, harmony, understanding, and mystisism everywhere. It's catchy and well written music brought musical theatre into the new decades. Still, today, there continues to be a following throughout the world for this musical.

This film was directed by Milos Formann, who is famous for "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" and "Amadeus." This film was made in 1979, a decade after the musical's debut. The music was influenced greatly by the 1970's pop funk and disco entanglements. (The original musical was a more rock-based sound, which unfortunatly is not captured in this film's revival of the score.) Starring here, is Treat Williams as Berger, John Savage as Claude, and even Nell Carter, who is in the ensemble.

Every time I watch this, I have to cringe at the plot structure of this film. It leaves behind the organized chaos of the original musical, and turns it into something that they thought would be "exceptable" to the movie-going audience. Indeed, the cast getting undressing completly, and showing drug-induced hallucinations, are barely filmable, but the script of this is ridiculous at best. We turn Claude into an Oklahoma enlistee, and Berger into a hippee, who gets sent off to war in his plce. Sheila is no longer a protestor but a rich school girl. What many people have found strange about this film is that the script incorperates touches from the musical, that make no sense on film. As a reason to put nudity into this film, the writers added a skinny dipping scene. An in place f the drug-hallucinations, Claude has a bizarre envisionment of he and Sheila getting married, in a confusing and irevalent dance sequence. (When you see the movie, you will see what I mean.)

The portrayals are excellent, however. John Savage is an interesting Claude, but his singing throughout the film was a bit confused. Treat Williams is literally, a treat (sorry for the pun), when it comes to his amazing voice during the songs "Donna" and his solos in "Let the Sunshine In." His acting was just as good, but one admits to wishing that he had better material to work with. Beverly D'Angelo is a sweet Sheila, and her rendition of "Good Morning Starshine" is very cute. I would have liked to see her perform the part, as it was written in the musical. She would have had a much better chance of getting noticed as a wonderful actress.

The music is, of coarse, excellent. The score is still unmatch when it comes to rock-musicals. The lyrics echo the spirit of the time period, and the music mirrors the rebelious personality of the people of the era. The only qualm I have is that this movie makes Hair seem a bit outdated. The entire score has been redone to fit a disco-flavour mood, that does not capture the poignancy of the original.

Overall, this is a film to be watch on moderation. Watch it on a Friday afternoon before leaving to a night out. It isn't the type of thing you will want to see over and over, but it leaves an impression on you. Most people will enjoy it as a film - not as a valid representation of the musical. I hope that you watch it in that light. Otherwise, you will find yourself a bit disapointed at the end.

5-0 out of 5 stars hair
the most underrated musical of our time. Anyone who loves great music will love this movie. A powerful score keeps the movies heart thumping throughout, definetly worth the wait to see on dvd.

4-0 out of 5 stars Ready for another generation
We showed this movie to our young daughters last night. Prompted by a growing sense of anti-war feelings we're experiencing with the daily reports of growing death tolls in Iraq, we felt it was appropriate. They were rapt. I think it was primarily the music and Twyla Tharp's choreography; however, the girls asked a lot of questions, and I think it gave them a little better understanding of what many teenagers felt during the Viet Nam War.

The movie version of this story is a worthy effort, made great by Milos Forman. The quality is not as I remembered it back when I saw it in the movie theater in 1980. And while our expectations of quality may have changed, our expectations of a good, entertaining film have not. Hair has grown into another generation of viewers who can appreciate it on many levels. It's worth another look.

3-0 out of 5 stars it was a good effort
This is a prime example of a great director, Milos Forman (One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and Amadeus) making a film that doesn't quite pull together. It's a good effort though. Start with one of the great musicals of all time, Hair. It is one of those that needed to be put on film (like the more recent Chicago). But in this case it didn't quite transfer successfully to film. One problem I think was casting Treat Williams as Berger. The acting was a little off. The dialogue was a little off. And the musical numbers didn't quite mesh in with the film (like they do in Grease, Chicago, or Moulin Rouge). I applaud the effort by Forman, if not the finished project. ... Read more


32. King Arthur (Unrated Widescreen Director's Cut)
Director: Antoine Fuqua
list price: $29.99
our price: $20.99
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Asin: B0002YLCG0
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 270
Average Customer Review: 3.57 out of 5 stars
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Description

King Arthur the Extended Unrated Director's Cut contains fourteen minutes of never-before-seen footage, including more intense battle sequences and the scenes "Rain and Snow" and "Saxons Surrounded." Bonus Features

• Alternate Ending "Badon Hill" With Optional Director Commentary
• Blood On The Land: Forging King Arthur
• Cast And Filmmaker Round Table
• Director Commentary
• "Knight Vision" Trivia Track
• Producer's Photo Gallery
• Konami's King Arthur Playable Xbox Demo ... Read more

Reviews (77)

3-0 out of 5 stars This legend just didn't live up to itself
This movie was yet another retelling of the legend of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table. It had an unusual angle to the familiar story, and a lot of potential that I believe it just didn't live up to. But wait, isn't this a kind of foolproof, proven winner? Well...

What I liked:
it was a grittier, more historically plausible interpretation of the King Arthur legend than anything filmed before. The chaos of the battle scenes was nicely done. There was nothing mystical or magical mixed up in there. The main characters were very flawed humans with their own stories: Merlin was a prominent leader, perhaps a Druid, but not a wizard; Arthur was a conflicted half-British, half-Roman noble who learned egalitarian values and cared deeply for his pagan comrades; and all the knights of the Round Table were foreign men eager to leave the service of the Roman Empire once their 15 year tour of duty was up. I was able to appreciate the care that went into researching the likely historical setup for the tale of these renowned "heroes".

What I disliked:
First, there were logistical flaws like wimpy people pulling bows that had 120 lb draw weights, weapons from inconsistent historical periods and countries, the overly done "tough Amazon warrior princess" typing done with Guinevere (it was laughably implausible). That's enough to bother some people, but I can get over that sort of thing if the rest of a movie is pulled off well.

Sadly, King Arthur wasn't pulled off that well overall, and I think it was a problem with the basic story being a bit underwhelming. The biggest (meaning, what took up most of the screenplay) task that these men faced involved not the fate of the nation nor the defeat of great evil, but protecting a small village from a band of marauding Saxons. I just had a hard time caring. You know a film is in trouble when the director has to rely so heavily on the music to convince the audience that there's deep emotion to a scene. Yes, that score was swelling heavily and often, but somehow, I just didn't connect on the visceral level with the dilemmas of Arthur and his knights, or the plight of the oppressed common folk that they were shepherding to Hadrian's Wall. The Arthur/Guinivere/Lancelot romance was halfhearted. Even the "sad" parts involving deaths of good guys didn't grab me, and I normally choke up. I kept wondering, what's missing -- why can't I lose myself in this story?

So this is a valuable lesson to all future filmmakers that may wish to tackle this subject. Perhaps the Arthurian legend does need magic and mystery to carry it successfully on the big screen - after all, if you're going to take on a larger-than-life tradition, your scope had better be larger than life. Otherwise, why bother? You could any number of other documented military campaigns instead. Too much petty realism combined with a too-small plot focus may have been the death of this King Arthur movie.

-Andrea, aka Merribelle

4-0 out of 5 stars Quite decent upon re-review
As I said I would do, due to negative feedback from a past review, I watched the film again, listened to the soundtrack, and am reading the novelization (I also happened to catch an MSN Video interview from Jerry Bruckheimer in regard to the film).

I have to say, now that I fully understand the context of the film and researching behind the actual Arthurian legend used (the 5th Century, first-account of the legend my a monk whose name I cannot think of now). This was the first account of King Arthur...a King Arthur who at that time had no (full) alliegence to Christianity, since 15th Century re-writing of the legend incorporated Christianity, despite Arthur's alliegence to Rome in the 5th Century

With that all said and done, I can see where the film is coming from. The film does not have anything to do with the very culturally familiar fiction of "Sword And The Stone" or "Merlin" feating Sam Niell, which would cause most of us to scold the film...when we were probably told in our childhood something fictitous and he hold that as the fact. King Arthur has no fiction, no magic, no nothing...it's all the raw legend of the 5th Century...the ORIGINAL story (stilghtly adapted to 21st Century in terms of dialogue et al), since each century had their own version of the story.

This film centers on a period of time when King Arthur, being born in Britian yet showing allegience to Rome, paves the path for his future, and what is now the legend; standing up for what he beleives despite ridicule. The events in the film just happen to be about this one point specifically, and not a whole epic life story as would be expected by the vague title King Arthur.

The music, performed by the brilliant Hans Zimmer, saves some points of the movie I still have issues with. The vivid use of color, lighting, and scene staging helps as well. I still enjoy Keira Kinghtley's acting, and am growing onto Clive Owen a little more, however he still seemed a bit stale for my liking, however it could be all in the part if one considers Arthur is somewhat in dismay and doesn't have true confidence throughout most of the film.

All in all, weighing everything again, I was able to get more out of the film and appreciate it much more and like it much better now that I know the context of the story. However, I suggest that all people in my situation at first watch the MSN Video interview with Jerry Bruckheimer since it helps sort things out and actually brings more to the film which ended up being quite good, however it has a bumpy path toward getting great reviews from people unless they do some research into the film's origins.

3-0 out of 5 stars King Arthur
Coming off of last year's "Pirates of the Caribbean", Disney's hopes had to be high for Jerry Bruckheimer's supposed factual retelling of the Arthur legend in "King Arthur". Instead, they get something that is hit and miss, no doubt in part to a studio mandated editing that turned a n R-rated violent and bloody movie into a PG-13 family affair.

Arthur (Owen), is presented as Arturius, a commander for the Roman empire. On the brink of gaining freedom for himself and his knights, he rescues Guenivere (Knightley), turns on Rome, and alighns with the Guenivere's people, the Woads. Eventually, this turn will lead to him becoming the ruler of all the Britons.

This movie is filled with action and fighting, but as I mentioned earlier, it has been toned down and sometimes feels choppy. Clive Owen does not have enough screen presence or noteriety to carry the role of Arthur. Kiera Knightley is most likely the only recognizable name in the cast to Americans, and she does not show up until almost halfway through the film. She also seems to be a little too small to be wielding the swords that she does, especially against some very large men. I like the idea of Guenivere being a warrior, but perhaps they should have chosen someone that fits the part.

Perhaps I nitpick too much, but this movie for the most part did little for me. That fault does not lie on any one person's head, and perhaps I will have a different opinion when the R-rated version comes out on DVD, probably this fall.

4-0 out of 5 stars Imaging a new story for the "real" King Arthur
I am open to reinterpreting classic myths and legends in different settings. For example, it their "Elseworld" stories DC comics has retold the familiar origins of Superman and Batman in different time periods: e.g., Superman arrives in the England of the Dark Ages or Batman in the London of Victorian England. For that matter, "Camelot 3000" has Arthur and the knights of his roundtable reincarnated in the year 3000 in time to save England from an alien invasion. So when "King Arthur" wants to locate the "true story" of Arthur in the last days of the Roman occupation of Brittania I find that to be an intriguing idea.

The Romans had always found this last outpost of the Empire a problematic area: Hadrian's Wall essentially separates the north (Scotland) from the south (England), trying to keep the Woads (Huh? We would get the wrong idea if you called these people the Celts?) on the other side of the barrier. Adding to the incentive to abandon the land is the arrival of the Saxons on the scene who are set on killing everyone and pillaging everything. In such a land, a man who could become a rallying point against the onslaught of barbarism would be worth remembering.

In David Franzoni's script Arthur (Clive Owen) is the son of a Roman officer and a Briton woman. Sent to Rome to be educated he returned as Arturius, commander of a garrison on Hadrian's well. His knights, in a subplot that does come across as a bit forced, are from the land of Sarmatia, far to the west. When their land was defeated the Romans spared their lives, but bound the knights and their male descendants to 15 years of military service. Now that period is up and awaiting their honorable discharges (and safe passage throughout the empire) are the last six of the Sarmatia knights who ride with Arthur: Lancelot (Ioan Gruffudd), Tristan (Mads Mikkelsen), Gawain (Joel Edgerton), Galahad (Hugh Dancy), Bors (Ray Winstone) and Dagonet (Ray Stevenson). They just want to go home, but a bishop (Ivano Marescotti) shows up from Rome with one last mission.

The knights go, but it is not for the bishop, because they are all pagans, or for Rome, because they care little for an empire that is abandoning the land their friends died defending, but for Arthur. The only one who does not seem to know that he is a living legend is Arthur himself; or, if he knows, he neither cares nor believes in the stories. But Merlin (Stephen Dillane), the holy man of the Woads respects Arthur as the warrior who can lead men in battle, Cerdic (Stellan Skarsgård) the leader of the Saxons hears Arthur's name everywhere he goes and finds him the rare man worth killing, and young Guinevere (Keira Knightley) has been raised on fairy tales about Arthur and his knights. This film is not about King Arthur as much as it is about how Arthur became king in this reimagining of the tale.

Given the context of this telling of the Arthur story it makes sense that the epic love triangle between Arthur, Guenivere and Lancelot is jettisoned. In many ways that story, which remains the greatest love triangle since it is the husband's wife and best friend, has taken over the Arthurian legend. Director Antoine Fuqua is really going back to the basics, although in a way that will make most Arthurian scholars cringe. In this context I like not only turning Guenivere into a Celtic warrior but also that she advocates Arthur's destiny and is not merely a landed lady worthy of marriage. Besides, there is the nice contrast between Knightley's stately beauty as she fires her arrows and her ferocity as she gets to race across a battle field and win a bunch of sword fights. You get the feeling she was having the most fun of anyone in this film (I waited patiently for Ioan Gruffudd to do something really impressive with his two swords but they never really came up with anything).

What is interesting given the idea that the Knights of the Round Table were the personification of Christian warriors is how the Church is blamed in the film for the downfall of Rome. Arthur is a true believer who has taken the teachings of Christianity to the level of the equality of all human beings, while the only other Christians we see in the film are engaging in torture and slavery. Arthur embodies the best of both Roman and Christian virtues, which makes him a most unique individual, but this film really does some serious retroactive Church bashing.

Yes, there are some problematic elements in this film. No Roman family, let along one with the Pope's favorite godson, is going to be living beyond Hadrian's Wall in Caledonia (Scotland), and I the ending of the sword fight between Arthur and Cerdic is so trite by this point in movie history it is rather insulting to the audience. But on balance this is ambitious effort to tell the "real" story and there the situation is reasonably well thought out (plus working in bits from classic films like "The Seven Samurai" and "Alexander Nevsky"). Most importantly, the actors make it believable, even when they have to proclaim rather pretentious dialogue. The climactic battle scene offers a nice blend of Roman technology and Celtic bravery (I thought the charge of the Woads was a nice representation of the speed of the Celtic attack since they do not bother with armor), and the result, while not a great film, is certainly interesting enough to warrant a look.

5-0 out of 5 stars LONG LIVE "KING ARTHUR!"
Taken from elements of the Arthurian legend and archeological fact, "King Arthur" is a rousing, action-packed film of gigantic proportions. While some of the revisionistic elements are debatable, director Antoine Fuqua has crafted an entertaining and emotional epic. The characters are perfectly cast, with Clive Owen doing a remarkable job as Artorious Casstus, a man forced to choose between returning to Rome and defending the home of his mother: Britain. Ioan Gruffud is great as Lancelot, and Keira Knightley is beautiful and charming as the revisionist Guinevere, who can love Arthur while still kicking butt as a Woad warrior. Supplemented by a great supporting cast, an amazing score by Hans Zimmer, and an excellent recreation of the battle of Baden Hill, "King Arthur" is one heck of an adventure story. Any fan of historical epics, and students of the Arthurian legend, will not want to miss "King Arthur!" Grade: A+ ... Read more


33. Doctor Dolittle
Director: Richard Fleischer
list price: $14.98
our price: $11.98
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00004TS0D
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 2533
Average Customer Review: 4.75 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (12)

4-0 out of 5 stars DOCTOR DOLITLE LOOKS GREAT ON DVD!
If you haven't seen the underrated original DR. DOLITLE in widescreen stereo as you will be able to on DVD, you haven't seen it! The photography is outstanding (shot in TODD-AO 70MM) and the orchestrations and songs sound great! The Laser Disc was the only way to experience this oustanding family musical...until now. Sadly, though, two of the films best songs, "Where Are The Words" and the beautiful "Something In Your Smile" were cut from the film right before its release and are not restored here as hoped; be sure to check them out on the soundtrack, available on CD (you can hear the melodies play in the overture, opening credits, and exit music). Still, this is a great looking, great sounding musical for everyone! Many muusicals of the late Sixties were unfairly compared (or indeed did try to emulate) "The Sound of Music" and "Mary Poppins" As time has gone on, they can be finally apprecaited as the outstanding entertainments some of them are, like DOCTOR DOLITTLE.

5-0 out of 5 stars An Overlooked Treasure!
"Dr. Dolittle" is one of the most enjoyable family movies to view again and again. You'll find yourself humming the delightful "Talk To The Animals" for days! From the magical island to the giant snail and the 'push me-pull you', this movie is filled with wonderful cinema moments. The DVD version has obvious advantages, but I give 2 thumbs up even for the VHS version. Get the popcorn and enjoy this overlooked treasure!

5-0 out of 5 stars Oh, Eddie Murphy...
What were you thinking? I'll admit the 1998 remake was entertaining, the way "Wings" is at one o'clock in the morning when nothing else is on, but, like "The Nutty Professor" Murphy's kid-friendly remake looks like a crime against cinema when placed next to its source material. First off, this is a musical with a beautiful score by Leslie Bricusse (who wrote the songs for "Willy Wonka" and "Stop the World, I Want To Get Off" with longtime partner Anthony Newley, who stars in this film). Also, Rex Harrison WORKED to learn to talk to animals. It wasn't a magical power he was born with, the man studied! He doesn't need cheesy (if well-cast) celebrity voiceovers and computer-generated mouth-movement to convince us, either. So if you want your kids to settle for second best and, as a result, drag you to mediocre kiddy-fair after mediocre kiddy-fair (which, in the age of "The Cat in the Hat" is pretty bad) let 'em have Eddie Murphy. But if you want your kids to have taste and appreciate a quality piece of filmmaking, rent this film immediately. Even if you have no kids, buy it, rent it, whatever.

4-0 out of 5 stars Never Appreciated Enough
This 1967 box office dud, came a few years too late to be appreciated. Although it had several Oscar nominations and a couple wins, it came at a time when musicals had fallen out of favor and had huge, overblown budgets. It still has many charms, including a very sincere performance by Rex Harrison. He talk-sings his way through the score like he did in "My Fair Lady", and actually performs many of his songs live on set. Composer/actor Anthony Newley made his American film debut and shows us all why he was such an amazing talent. The DVD looks and sounds great, if you've never seen the movie in all it's wide-screen glory, you need to see it this way. The sound is full-bodied and is very typical of 1960's sound technology. Fox always had a great sound department, and on a good sound system, you'll hear an awesome score. Highly recommended for the pre-computer effects generation. The film was cut after it's initial road-show version and there's 2 songs on the soundtrack album that are not in the film. Maybe someday the road-show version will show up again, but don't count on it. Also recommend getting the CD of the score with the missing songs.

5-0 out of 5 stars A wonderful, timeless, and funny film!
I highly recommend this film for people of all ages It's a great film for the entire family to watch. Rex Harrison is absolutly brilliant as Doctor Dolittle. He's a wonderful actor in every film that he does. It deserves all the stars it can get. It's well worth the price and a film I never tire of watching. ... Read more


34. All That Jazz
Director: Bob Fosse
list price: $14.98
our price: $11.98
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Asin: B00003CX8U
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 2804
Average Customer Review: 4.37 out of 5 stars
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Album Description

1995 reissue of the soundtrack to director Bob Fosse's acclaimed 1979 musical co-starring Roy Scheider and Jessica Lange. Ralph Burns arranged & conducted all 14 tracks, whichinclude performances by George Benson, Sandahl Bergman and Ben Vereen with Scheider. A Spectrum/ Karussell release. ... Read more

Reviews (87)

4-0 out of 5 stars FOSSE ON FOSSE
With a typically sardonic and vicious glare, Bob Fosse examines his own obsessive life as a creator/director/choreographer -- and womanizer, drinker, druggie. While this movie has its shamelessly over-the-top qualities (Jessica Lange as Death, for one), the musical sequences are so dazzling that they instantly make this move a must-see, if not must-have, for any Fosse fan. The opening, a wow-you-in-the-gut audition sequence set to On Broadway (Benson's stunning version), does more in four minutes than the film of Chorus Line does in its entire running time to convey the show biz world of Broadway. And the then-gamine Ann Reinking is on hand to literally play herself, as well as dance in that feline way. The musical number Take Off With Us is at once amusing, sparkling, sensual and spectacular, featuring an explosive ensemble of dancers. Fosse's bitter take on his own mortality may slow things down (the Lenny-inspired sequences bore into your brain) a bit, when the music is playing you are in for a revved-up treat.

3-0 out of 5 stars FLAWED, WEAK TRANSFER of a THOROUGHLY ENGROSSING FILM
"All That Jazz" is a semi-autobiographical recounting of Bob Fosse's life. Directed by the master himself, the film follows Broadway producer, Joe Gideon (Roy Scheider)as he spirals into an oblivion of drug addiction, alcoholism and womanizing while preparing to launch his greatest show yet. Joe is ably pushed to the edge of the great beyond by the lovely Angel of Death (Jessica Lange)who eventually gets her wish. This is perhaps the only time in my viewing experience that a musical film has given me chills. The entire plot functions on the mental anguish of its protagonist and his inevitable demise and the final few moments are truly unsettling.
So is FOX's DVD transfer quality; the image suffers from dated - often muddy - colors, washed out and pasty flesh tones, weak blacks, an excessive amount of film grain and various age related artifacts that generally detract from the visual experience. Edge enhancement and pixelization are big problems in certain scenes but others appear to be free of their frustrating inclusion. The soundtrack is Stereo Surround, well balanced though, on occasion, strident.
EXTRAS: An interview with Scheider while he was making the film that is needlessly divided into chapter stops that don't matter. Ditto for several snippets of Fosse at work on the set. The theatrical trailer is also included.
BOTTOM LINE: If you simply can't live without this film - as I could not (for its brilliant story telling vision and disconcerted charm)then I recommend it highly. The transfer, however, will disappoint - especially for a film of seventies vintage!

5-0 out of 5 stars A visual feast even for an only lukewarm fan of Broadway
Soon after its 1979 release, curiosity impelled me to see ALL THAT JAZZ. I say curiosity because anything smacking of a film musical didn't then attract my attention much. Not yet an old dog, and apparently still capable of learning a new trick, I remember being impressed. Recently, I saw it presented on the Big Screen once again as part of a classic film revival. I'm reminded what a truly superb production this is.

Roy Scheider, in arguably his greatest role ever, portrays Joe Gideon, a work-obsessed Broadway choreographer and director existing on cancer sticks, booze, sex and uppers. Directed by the preeminent choreographer Bob Fosse, ALL THAT JAZZ was purportedly semi-autobiographical.

Joe is struggling to put together a new dance production and, simultaneously, edit a behind-schedule film, all the while juggling the three principal women in his life: ex-wife, current significant other, and teenage daughter. Talk about stress! In periodic visual sidebars, we watch as Joe rationalizes his self-destructive behavior to a glamorous Angel of Death, coquettishly played by Jessica Lange.

The film's dance sequences, products of Bob Fosse's brilliance, and sets by Phillip Rosenberg and Tony Walton, are visual extravaganzas not to be missed. (Oscars were awarded for Art Direction and Set Decoration.) Perhaps the cleverest is the solo routine performed by the ex-wife character as she rehearses a number to be performed in Gideon's latest production, all the while debating with him the course of their failed relationship. Positively engaging is the "impromptu" number performed for Joe at his apartment by his current mistress (played by the strikingly long-legged Ann Reinking), along with his daughter. Then there's the sexually suggestive "Air Otica/Come Fly With Us" ballet sequence, Gideon's attempt to energize an otherwise stodgy airline commercial. (As one of the airline execs resignedly puts it, "Well, we've lost the family audience.")

Another nice touch for the uninitiated is the revelation that performer selection and training for a polished dance routine is a hard, sweaty, merciless process. The faint-hearted best not show up for the audition.

Perhaps the film's only flaw is its length as it unwinds to its foregone conclusion. Although ALL THAT JAZZ won an Oscar for Film Editing, the Ben Vereen-assisted toe-tapper should have been considerably shortened. However, that said, it must be emphasized that the movie is richly entertaining throughout. Perchance you ever have the opportunity to see it on the Big Screen, don't pass it by. As Gideon so expressively states in front of the mirror each morning after he girds himself (with Dexedrine and Visine) for another grueling day , "It's show time!"

5-0 out of 5 stars THE JAZZY, SNAZZY, MORBID UNDERBELLY OF SHOWBIZ
What a dazzlingly engaging experimentation with the medium of film as we take an evocative peep into the life of a showbiz-obsessed director Fosse -- the hedonistic man behind the actual stage version of "Chicago."

Apart from being a truly sexy turn-on of a musical, it hits one out of the park as an exploration of an artist at war with himself. Somewhat indulgent, yes, but it is the brutally honest potrayal of the many imperfections (girls, gin, glitz) of a perfectionist, in all his triumphs and trials, that makes this film a very, very endearing experience.

The bleak undertones may scare the faint-hearted but for them there's all the riveting stage action. A wholesome film that belongs in your own collections, not just in your Blockbuster records.

5-0 out of 5 stars Narcissism On Center Stage
The whole point of the movie is Fosse is a narcissistic (...)and freely admits it. He revels in it. His attitude is not "do or don't do what I do" but, rather, I don't care what you or anyone else does because I'm special and you aren't. Sort of a Barry Bonds of the dance world. Fosse sees the Broadway dance musicals business as fake and silly. Actually, he is the one who is fake and silly and, like all narcissists, in his heart of hearts, he knows it. A rollercoaster ride of drug and alcohol binges and loud garish dance nuumbers. Brilliantly conceived and excellently acted by scheider. ... Read more


35. 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea (Special Edition)
Director: Richard Fleischer
list price: $19.99
our price: $15.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00005JKU0
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 1838
Average Customer Review: 4.87 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (52)

5-0 out of 5 stars Voyage of the Nautilus
Kirk Douglas and James Mason explore the mysteries of the deep in the Sci-Fi classic "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea". Rumours of a sea monster that attacks ships, has open the interests of a curious French scientist (Paul Lukas), his faithful aide (Peter Lorre) and an able harpoonist (Kirk Douglas). Upon a striking encounter, they learn that the "sea monster" is a powerful under-water vessel under the command of the vengeful Captain Nemo (James Mason). "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea" is a remarkable adaptation of Jules Verne's stunning adventure tale. The film features a powerful story, great under-water photography and a rich music score. Kirk Douglas, Paul Lukas and Peter Lorre are well cast but it's James Mason's intense performance of Captain Nemo that often drives the whole film. It also contains some impressive visuals and thrilling momments including a gripping battle against a giant squid.

Disney gives "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea" the full "2-Disc special edition" treatment. The movie is presented in it's original theatrical widescreen format. The DVD contains an amazing video transfer and clear digital sound quality. Disc 2 features exclusive bonus material including Behind-the-scene featurettes, Theatrical trailer, picture gallery and audio commentaries. Like previous Disney DVD, the disc also contains forced commercials and trailers of upcoming Disney releases. Overall, it scores an "A".

5-0 out of 5 stars It's not just a Disney classic, it's a classic, period.
Among the live-action output of the Disney studios there are precious few _truly_ great films. One of them is "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea."

It was the first wholly live-action movie made at the Burbank studios (the previous live films having been made in England, one of which -- "Treasure Island" -- is another classic, recently reissued in a gorgeous DVD transfer). "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea" is a classic example of how simply throwing money, talent, and imagination at a project can result in a masterpiece.

It is difficult to overpraise this film. Earl Felton's imaginative rethinking of Jules Verne's novel and his script's focus on the moral issues at the center of the story; James Mason's subtle and controlled performance as Captain Nemo; the startlingly realistic miniatures (which have not been surpassed); and Richard Fleischer's simple, uncluttered direction are standouts.

But all these pale in the face of the incredible art design, which deservedly won an Oscar. The interior of the Nautilus cleverly imagines how a Victorian submarine (had there been such a thing!) would be furnished. The exterior is the most-fanciful submarine design ever conceived. It does for this film what Robby does for "Forbidden Planet."

Did I forget to mention the fight with the giant squid, one of the most-memorable scenes in the history of movies?

My only complaint is that I'm not a fan of Paul Smith's music. His principal theme for this film is inspired, perfectly invoking the fundamentally somber mood of the story, but the rest of the score doesn't come up to it. (It might be that the dreadful style of Disney's "house" orchestrations -- which afflict dozens of other Disney films -- keeps me from properly appreciating Smith's work.) I can only note that, while Disney was hiring one of Fox's model designers to create the miniatures, he might also have borrowed Bernard Herrmann, who, five years later, would produce a classic score for another Jules Verne story, also starring James Mason.

This transfer is the best yet (including the LV). The color is rich and varied (quite unlike the overly-red/muddy-green mess Technicolor would soon become), and I didn't see a single spot or scratch. There's a lot of supplemental material, including an hour-long "making of" feature that's well-above-average for this sort of thing, Disney or otherwise. There is also a intermittently interesting running commentary from the director and Rudy Behlmer, the film historian. Note that the "Operation Undersea" episode of Disneyland -- an hour-long "commerical" for the film that won an Emmy -- is _not_ included.

Despite its half-century age, "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea" has lost little of its freshness or excitement. If your kids don't like it -- get new kids.

5-0 out of 5 stars A Great DVD of a Great Film
Like many of the other reviewers of this movie, I'm a pre-boomer who was dazzled by the film as a child. Somewhere in my aging mom's attic, I have a few bolts (painted wood) from the movie set of the Nautilus, which I "borrowed" from one of the Disney properties as a kid nearly a half century ago. I remember taking a bus from LA to Burbank to stare through the slats of the fence in the back lot of the Disney Studios and seeing a partial model of the Nautilus, perhaps 1/3 scale, tossed in a corner like so much debris. What I would have given to be able to drag that model home.

When I viewed the VHS version of this film a couple of years ago, I was bitterly disappointed by the poor quality which made the watching experience actually painful to a fan like me. But, let me tell you, this DVD is as thrilling as the VHS was painful. This fully-restored version of the film comes roaring back to life in all of its glory and then some. It's the best film restoration these old eyes have ever beheld. Watched on a state-of-the-art widescreen TV, this is every bit the experience it was in the '50's and I think it's wonderful that this great film is now preserved for the ages, just as it was when it was first released.

Is this a perfect movie? No. Even as a kid, I noticed that the background music was too cheesy, that Kirk Douglas's songs seemed gratuitous, that the fish swimming outside the large porthole were cartoonish, and that the electrically-illuminated eye of the Giant Squid made an otherwise perfect special effect look a bit fake. I'm just as puzzled by those weaknesses today as I was then, especially since all other aspects of the film, including the numerous, Oscar-winning special effects involving the Nautilus, are masterful. But no movie is perfect and this movie, minor warts and all, is nothing less than a memorial to the genius of Disney, the acting of James Mason, the passion of the Disney staff, and the vision of Jules Verne.

5-0 out of 5 stars The best Disney movie ever... and a DVD to match it!
Finally! The definitive edition of a Jules Verne classic brought back in all its pomp and glory. The price, for once, is right.

I remember it when it first was released in Europe, and I can safely say that this version beats even that showing back then.

Extremely clear image, stupendous surround sound, make this a must have in the most absolute way.

Forget all the other versions ever made. This remains THE classic of them all!

Forget the dated special effects which, by the way, you may not even notice, since the story is so gripping and fast paced, that you may not even realize they are.

James Mason gives a wonderful portrayal of Captain Nemo. One of his best roles, together with Fieldmarshal Rommel in "The Desert Fox", Cicero in "Five Fingers" and Professor Arronax in "Journey to the Center of the Earth" of about the same period.
Kirk Douglas and Peter Lorre form a perfect if not odd comical duo, to ease the tension of the story.

The score is beautifully remastered and brings you immediately back to those long bygone days of great moviemaking.

I won't be long reviewing this movie, since many others before me, have already praised it and described it in detail.

I can only say, buy it, buy it, buy it!

Oh, and by the way, don't forget about another Jules Verne classic coming out soon on DVD and in Widescreen:
"Around the World in 80 Days".
That's another "absolutely must have".

In the meanwhile, have you checked on "Journey to the Center of the Earth".
Do you have it on your DVD shelf?
No?
Shame on you...
Go and get it fast.
It's been remastered and it's a worthy companion to the other two Jules Verne movies.
So, what are you waiting for?

4-0 out of 5 stars Superior DVD Package of a Memorable Film
Loosely based on the celebrated novel by Jules Verne and set in the late 19th Century, LEAGUES offers the story of Professor Arronax (Paul Lukas), his assistant Conseil (Peter Lorre), and harpooner Ned Land (Kirk Douglas), who are coaxed by the United States government to aid in the search for a sea monster said to be terrorizing shipping lanes. But the monster is not of flesh and blood, and soon the three find themselves in the hands of the mysterious Captain Nemo (James Mason) as prisoners aboard the Nautilus--a fully functional submarine capable of ramming ships and sending them to the ocean floor.

Underwater photography was hardly new in 1954, but never had it been used so extensively nor to such visually beautiful effect, and the art designs--particularly those for the Nautilus--are justly celebrated. But for all its beauty, it is the performances which make the film work. James Mason does not merely play Nemo, he seems to be Nemo; after seeing his performance it is impossible to imagine any other actor in the role. Paul Lukas adds yet another brilliantly understated performance to his memorable career, and while Kirk Douglas and Peter Lorre are hardly the Ned Land and Conseil of the Verne novel they have surprising chemistry and lend the film considerable dash.

At the time of its release, LEAGUES was the single most expensive motion picture ever made (ironically it would loose that dubious distinction later that same year to yet another film featuring James Mason: A STAR IS BORN), and every penny of the money spent shows in the onscreen result. While many of Disney's live-action films are fondly recalled, few have had enduring fame, much less claim to status as art--but LEAGUES is the exception, and although the episodic nature of the story seems a shade languid from time to time it remains both a landmark and one of the most influential films of its decade. Truly enjoyable from start to finish.

GFT, Amazon Reviewer ... Read more


36. Li'l Abner
Director: Melvin Frank
list price: $14.99
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Asin: B0007TKGXK
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 1907
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This is one movie musical that doesn't bother adapting its stage presentation for the big screen:Li'l Abner cheerfully uses brightly colored, patently fake backdrops and stage sets for its mythical setting. And why not? A movie musical based on a cartoon strip is about as far from reality as you can get. Al Capp's legendary comic about the hillbilly denizens of Dogpatch was brought to Broadway by the estimable comedy team Melvin Frank and Norman Panama, who also produced the movie. Along with sampling Capp's world (the pursuit of noncommittal Abner by Daisy Mae on Sadie Hawkins Day is a major plot device), the movie is a goofy record of 1950s attitudes and concerns--in fact, Dogpatch is threatened with destruction when the government wants to use it as an atomic test site. The actors' Broadway delivery has a deadening effect after a while, and some of the makeup is downright weird (think the Whos in the live-action Grinch). Gene de Paul's music is unmemorable, but Johnny Mercer's lyrics provide considerable fun, and the athletic dances are based on Michael Kidd's stage choreography. Plus, the movie honors Capp's eye for impossibly bodacious women by casting Julie Newmar as Stupefyin' Jones and Stella Stevens (her first movie role) as Appassionata Von Climax. --Robert Horton ... Read more


37. The Court Jester
Director: Melvin Frank, Norman Panama
list price: $14.99
our price: $11.24
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Asin: 079215519X
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 945
Average Customer Review: 4.82 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (60)

5-0 out of 5 stars Charming and Hilarious Re-telling of the Robin Hood Story
I am not a great Danny Kaye fan, but this movie is one the the very funniest I've ever seen. Everything about it is excellent, from the production values to the songs & lyrics, from the fine quality of actors to the charm and wit of the dialogue and the story. There is literally nothing wrong with this movie. It is fit for all audiences, from the youngest to the oldest members of your family. I remember the first time I saw it, being struck by the fact that all the actors seemed to be having an absolutely marvellous time. Particularly during the Jester's first call at entertaining the court...unforgettable and sheer delight. Every single person on camera looked like they were having a wonderful time just being there. I hadn't seen anything like such a fine emsemble cast since 'All About Eve.' I think it must have been because there were no bad lines, no bad parts, no scenes that didn't work, and everyone had a chance to shine. Having a good material to work with really does make a world of difference. Stars Danny Kaye, Angela Landsbury, Basil Rathbone, and a host of marvellous British actors whose names are right now escaping my memory. Buy it. Keep it. Enjoy it for years.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Brew that is True...
If one is tired of baudy bathroom humor of the typical comedies one finds today, perhaps "The Court Jester" will satisfy your comical thirst. Set in England during the time of chivalry and knighthood this musical comedy stars Danny Kaye as a ne'er do well circus performer who ends up out"fox"ing the dastardly villains, getting the girl and saving the real king's butt (so to speak). Glynis Johns plays Maid Jean whose stunning beauty and big eyes just make you melt (wow, I wish I'd been born earlier). Basil Rathbone is his typical bad self as the evil Ravenhurst playing it to the hilt! This film pulls out all the comical stops from tongue twisters to hypnosis, magnetism and even a Zorro sword play spoof with Rathbone! This is Danny Kaye's finest and funniest comedy! A must see movie!

5-0 out of 5 stars Comedy Could Not Better Be!
In the history of the movies, fewer things are more amusing than watching Danny Kaye behave as Danny Kaye. Watching his films was a wonderful part of my childhood,and I remember being at home from High School on the day of his passing. I'm very glad for the legacy he has left us to enjoy.
In "The Court Jester" he couldn't be more in his element as he amuses us with his usual patter numbers clever, tounge-twisting lyrics and sword play, and moves us with his loving care of the orphaned infant heir to the English throne. The scene of his lullabying the baby was shown as a tribute to him at the end of "Entertainment Tonight" the weekend after his death and it was a fitting tribute to him, his love of children, and the childlike sense of wonder he brought to all of his films.
As Kaye's love interest, Jean, a charismatic Glynis Johns is highly complimentary.She is not the sterotypical woman of medeival times, but having been raised as a boy, has a lot of cunning, ingenuity, and an occassional bit of brawn as the leader of those in rebellion against Cecil Parker's evil King.
Angela Lansbury's Princess Gwendolyn longs for true love rather than an arranged marriage. She is firm and decisive in many ways, as she helps bring the tale to a positive conclusion.
As the sourceress, Mildred Natwick leads into some of the film's funniest scenes, including the notorious "Pellet with the poison is in the vessel with the pestle" routine that has become a classic.
Hubert Hawkins' cleverness in seizing the real Court Jester,(John Carradine, a man whom I could never really think of as funny) who was very arrogant, disguising himself in his clothes, and using his tounge-twisting dialogue with the King to cover his tracks is also a riot.
Basil Rathbone as the evil henchmen is a refined villian. It's amusing the way Kaye kept pushing his name out of the way during the opening credits, and I have wondered how often Hawkins' accelerated knighthood ceremony had to be rehearsed before those on the set could stop laughing.

Although the film overlooks the fact that a person can't be hypnotized against their will, the way Hubert Hawkins is, the comedy is generally light, and goofy, doesen't get any saucier than the exposure of an infant's backside, and children will love it.
And as Hawkins reassures us at the beginning,"What starts like a scary tale ends like a fairy tale, and life couldn't possibly better be!"

5-0 out of 5 stars So funny your cheeks will ache from laughing!!
This is one of Danny Kaye's best. He was so talented and his comic timing is impeccable. The "chalice from the palace" scene is so funny that I have not forgotten it over the years. This movie will get you out of the blues in no time.

5-0 out of 5 stars You will go and buy this movie and do it like that (snap)!
This is my favorite movie of all time. When I was a kid Danny Kaye movies played every Sunday morning and we would wait the few months until it came around again.

I have never stopped laughing at the scenes, the funny interplay between Danny Kaye and the court and his continual buffonery.

Even kids will love this movie. It starts with a dance routine which is almost like Robin Hood Men in Tights. That is quaint, yet the next scene will take you in and take you on the funniest rides of all time.

Kaye, disquised as an old man who is hard of hearing having a scream fest with the captain of the guard. This few minutes is one of the funniest scenes I have ever witnessed. Then there are just funny scenes that will make you split your sides with laughter from there on out.

The wit it took to bring together this cast and the concept of the movie seems that it will never be outdated.

What Danny Kaye and the rest do here is ascend age and time making this movie appeal to any age group, young or old. I have seen a young family start off thinking this was a silly movie then, taken by the first comedic interaction, launch into continuous laughter. I laugh getting a kick out of watching everyone else laugh too.

This movie is a must for any DVD or VHS library. Share it with your friends, watch it when you are a little too stressed out to do anything else to lighten up your day.

The plays on words, the different fast paced situational scenes that will have you thinking; 'how clever...,' even when you think that Hawkins/Giacommo is at his end, then it gets even funnier. The Chalis with the poisly has the pellet with the pesly......

This movie is so fast paced that you cannot believe you have sat there and laughed for the better part of 90 minutes. The great thing about the DVD, you do not have to worry about watching this over and over again and wearing it out.

This movie has great color and scenery. The imagery is wonderful. You wonder if they really were in a castle.

Laugh and love this movie......I recommend it for school, church and family activities. It is a classic that may become more well known with time. ... Read more


38. Training Day
Director: Antoine Fuqua
list price: $14.96
our price: $7.99
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Asin: B00005JKED
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 1016
Average Customer Review: 3.79 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (447)

5-0 out of 5 stars A Micraculously Provocative Must-See Cautionary Tale
Antoine Fuqua's (The Replacement Killers) exasperatingly intense, masterly evocative,
and grandly psychologically accosting crime police thriller Training Day starring
Denzel Washington, Ethan Hawke, Scott Glenn, Macy Gray, and Snopp Doggy Dogg
commences by imprinting on the viewer an all-together familiar seedy crime melodrama.
Then this seemingly recycled cop movie equation summarily becomes estranged
from all of the genre's pre-conceived formulas, conventions, and clichés and
zestfully thrusts its audience into a Pulp Fiction-esque Twilight Zone of infinite
unknowns.

Overtly intense it may be, Training Day's so-called excesses are absolutely necessary to this film's shockingly disquieting view of modern law-enforcement and societal factors. Brimming full of the morally deplorable, tumultuously volatile, and authentically immediate sights and sounds that at first may resonate as a typical wam bam thriller, Training Day intellectually reaps a ground-braking resourcefulness that consistently curtails the audience from comprehending its inner plot points too quickly or becoming aware of it's character predestined paths before they develop into view. Though the film does provide us with ample evidence to it's character's interior inner workings, Training Day continues to creativity and tirelessly redefine it's identity so often and so cleverly that any first-time viewer can't help but be consciously blown away by it's narrative, radically stunned by it's story-telling audacity, or emotionally bewildered by it's cultural implications. It remains a testament to this film's resiliency that it persists in haunting you so long after it concludes spinning web of intrigue.

Dominantly at the artistic center of this vivaciously riveting crime tale, Denzel
Washington blazes open, with one decisively unforgettably potent character,
an entirely new occupational direction for the once cinematically pure leading
good guy. In an unexpected melee of acting bravado, Washington almost appears
to be inordinately possessed with this character that is so aesthetically and
dramatically powerful that you almost forget Washington is playing it.

In a blisteringly radiant gem of a performance that should earn him an Academy
-Award nomination, Denzel plays L.A.P.D. Narcotics veteran Alonzo Harris who
in the course of a single day trains and enlightens 19-month rookie cop Jake
Hoyt (Ethan Hawke) in the increasingly sinister underbelly of drug policing
in Los Angeles. Harris initiates Boyt upon the mandatory necessity of protecting
the tax-paying sheep (the citizens) from the Narcotic predators by becoming
predators themselves. Alonzo sanctifies these views by lulling Hoyt into believing
that his skeptical pessimism is an indispensable requisite of becoming an undercover
cop, and with this premise the audience's unfathomable descent into inconceivable
darkness begins.

Encased with incredibly edgy supporting performances, invariably claustrophobic
locales, an charismatically haphazardly enticing plot, many subtly thrilling
story eccentricities, and a superbly larger than life leading performance by
Denzel Washington, Training Day transcends it's source genre to pose generally
unsettling questions with such relish and audaciousness that it still should
remain as fresh and relevant fifteen years from now.

As for Training Day's upcoming DVD edition, hopefully it will include a descent
anmorphic widescreen presentation, an Antoine Faqua commentary track, deleted
scenes, and several other fine materials to go along with such a fabulous film.

P.S. Always Pick Up a Rape Victim's Wallet

5-0 out of 5 stars Reality Bites
Denzel Washington should be a lock for at least an Academy Award nomination as best actor in 2001 for his totally heartfelt, violent and over the top performance as a corrupt Los Angeles police narcotics officer. It's obvious that the LAPD is less than thrilled with this movie which is an amalgam of all the scandals which have rocked the department; i.e. Rodney King, 'Ramparts' for starters. Despite the potential difficulty in putting together a coherent tale the director has done his job with a film which holds the viewers' interest from the rising sun to the final scene early the next day.

The supporting cast is outstanding with Ethan Hawke, Snoop Dog, Dr. Dre, Scott Glenn and others providing excellent back up to Denzel as he glides through one day and night in the life of an LA narcotics officer.

Seeing this film twice let me appreciate all the more how well acted is the role played by Denzel. He is philosophical, violent, humorous, practical, political and, at all times, wise to the ways of the street. Ethan Hawke is marvelous as his 'rookie'and meshes very well with his more senior counterpart, Denzel Washington.

The only reason Denzel may not receive the major kudos he deserves for this role is that in today's hyper-patriotic, support the law enforcement climate, this downbeat look at the cops may not be deemed politically correct even as it is spot on.

1-0 out of 5 stars I hated this movie
I first of all am not a Denzel Washington fan. So my review is a little biase in the sense that I went in thinking this movie was going to be bad....and boy was it. I first want to say that Denzel Washington is a good actor he just doesn't do anything for me. I thought this movie was waaaayyyy over the top unrealistic and I could not in good consious recommend it. For one thing all the singers and rappers in the movie who can't act took away from any beliveable scenario. Ethan Hawkes character was such a wimp he had literally no back bone. Every "bad" thing that Denzels character wanted him to do he did it. I think this is one of the worse movies I ever seen. And the ending who didn't see that coming a mile away.

5-0 out of 5 stars The "Wolf" of Action Films...
...is what you can call Training Day, the distrubing police epic starring Denzel Washington in an Oscar-winning performance.
Denzel stars as Alonzo, a very corrupt cop playing both sides of the law. He doesn't resort to evidence, or jurys, or interrogations. He just packs brutal violence into his brand of law-making.
Training day is about a young cop's training day, a day that will test if he is good enough material that can become an infamous narcotic officer. His mentor, and mental abuser, is Alonzo. During the day Alonzo sets Jake(Ethan Hawke)up, holds a gun to his head and forces him to use narcotics that destroy his mind, and he makes him assist in murder and robbery. Alonzo teses him, plays with his mind, and puts jake way over his boiling point.
In the end, Alonzo ditches Jake with a gang of Mexican hitmen, leaves him for dead, and goes back to his wife(Eva Mendes) and their son.
Jake finds Alonzo, chases him to a rooftop, and they battle for control over Alonzo's ground. It is a climatic battle of "mentor" and "student".
Training Day is brutal and disturbing to watch and digest. It will certainly make you think about the NARC squad, and will leave you feeling different than when you came in.

4-0 out of 5 stars Overall Good
The acting is supurb by all, especially Denzel. I had some qualms about the type of character he played in order to get the statue, but actually seeing the movie put all that on the backburner. This film is not as cookie-cutter predictable as most cop dramas and in fact I was left honestly waiting to see what would happen next. There was a point where I felt the movie was dragging, but when the credits rolled I didn't feel at all cheated of my time or money. ... Read more


39. Fight Club
Director: David Fincher
list price: $26.98
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Asin: B00003W8NM
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 5606
Average Customer Review: 4.53 out of 5 stars
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All films take a certain suspension of disbelief. Fight Club takes perhaps more than others, but if you're willing to let yourself get caught up in the anarchy, this film, based on the novel by Chuck Palahniuk, isa modern-day morality play warning ofthe decay of society. Edward Norton is the unnamed protagonist, a man going through life on cruise control, feeling nothing. To fill his hours, he begins attending support groups and 12-step meetings. True, he isn't actually afflicted with the problems, but he finds solace in the groups. This is destroyed, however, when he meets Marla (Helena Bonham Carter), also faking her way through groups. Spiraling back into insomnia, Norton finds his life is changed once again, by a chance encounter with Tyler Durden (Brad Pitt), whose forthright style and no-nonsense way of taking what he wants appeal to our narrator. Tyler and the protagonist find a new way to feel release: they fight. They fight each other, and then as others are attracted to their ways, they fight the men who come to join their newly formed Fight Club. Marla begins a destructive affair with Tyler, and things fly out of control, as Fight Club grows into a nationwide fascist group that escapes the protagonist's control.

Fight Club, directed by David Fincher (Seven), is notfor the faint of heart; the violence is no holds barred. But the film is captivating and beautifully shot, with some thought-provoking ideas. Pitt and Norton are an unbeatable duo, and the film has some surprisingly humorous moments. The film leaves you with a sense of profound discomfort and a desire to see it again, if for no other reason than to just to take it all in. --Jenny Brown ... Read more

Reviews (1184)

5-0 out of 5 stars This Movie is Why "Professional" Critics Must Go
I didn't see this movie in the theaters because it had gotten very mixed reviews from the so-called professional movie reviewers. But, when it hit the local vidoe store, I thought I would give it a try. WOW, what a kick in the teeth, interesting, and fast moving journey into one man's mind. The path this movie takes is fantastic.

Norton and Pitt are perfectly cast, and supported by a crew of fight club members that make for a well-acted show. Meatloaf, Ed Gil, Jared Leto, et. al. are great in support as the members/followers of the leads. Helena Bonham Carter has the only real female role in this film and is perfectly cast. But as much as the acting, this movie is made by the story. Unconventional, with a great twist at the end, the whole movie kept me on the edge of my seat. As with many great movies, it is hard to classify the genre (action, comedy, drama), as there is a sampling of all in this film. In the end, I would just classify this as a great film.

Much was made of the violence of this movie when it first hit the theaters. Those critics overstated the case. There is blood and violence in the movie, but it is not excessive and it serves the plot well.

If you missed this in the theater, see it now. If you saw it once, see it again. I will.

5-0 out of 5 stars Fight Club-another reason to own a DVD player.
If any DVD was produced on the same level as the Terminator 2 Ultimate Edition and the Toy Story 3-Disc box set, it is this DVD. Fight Club is not only a VERY well produced DVD, but the supplemental material will keep you busy for LITERALLY hours. You will finally have a reason to 'break in' that angle button on your remote. As a story, Fight Club takes a more cerebral approach to ones thought processes. Containing many cool effects, Fight Club may make the average movie viewer pop a few Excedrins while trying to figure out the point of the film. While many may finish the movie in total confusion, mostly everyone will agree that Fight Club is a unique movie experience. When I received the DVD package, I was instantly impressed with the graphic design of the outer package, the discs themselves and the booklet that is included. Initially, this DVD comes off as a "special edition" rather then a simple "movie release on DVD". Whoever created the graphics on the cover and throughout the booklet has a very active imagination. Disc one has the film, disc two has the supplemental material. ** Pause the third FBI WARNING at the beginning of the disc....it is quite funny** Disc one offers you your usual "chapters" choices with 'moving' scenes (like The Matrix), audio setup for Dolby surround for both a 2 speaker setups and 5.1 setups in English and Spanish. This is also a THX certified DVD, so it includes a THX setup screen. Disc one also gives you the choice of several audio commentaries to listen to throughout the film, including David Fincher, Bradd Pitt, Ed Norton, Helena Bonham Carter, the novelist and the screenwriter, the Director of Photography, Visual Effects Supervisor and a couple of others. In a nutshell, you have a choice to listen to A LOT of people, a great addition to this DVD. Picture quality of Fight Club was incredible. Overall, the picture is moody and dark with beautiful blacks and wonderful color detail. It is beautifully photographed with incredible shadow detail and crystal clear highlights. Sound quality was equally impressive. Being THX certified, you can expect nothing less then awesome. Edward Nortons voice-over sounds very live, as though he's sitting right in front of you. The sound has beautiful detail, with stereo separation being impressively realistic and the music and dialogue recorded incredibly well. Surround detail is amazing with some scenes having deep bass that will make the neighbors call the cops. Disc two will stay in your DVD player for a long time. The supplemental material includes crew and cast information. behind the scenes of the production, the visual effects and on-location footage with commentaires and multiple angles.......WOW! Disc two also contains seven deleted scenes as well as trailers, TV spots, music videos, an interview with Edward Norton and a bunch of storyboards, visual effects stills, paintings and many other additions to keep your fingers happy on that remote. The Producers of this DVD should be applauded....not only is the picture and sound quality top-notch, but the graphical elements and the supplemental materials included are fantastic and incredibly entertaining. I highly recommend this DVD for those who enjoyed this movie in the theatre, who are curious about the film, or those simply interested in seeing what a superb DVD release is all about. Enjoy!

3-0 out of 5 stars Not bad, but...
OK, blend Matrix, Guy Richi, and Osama Bin Laden and you get a masterpiece? A funny comedy, not more. Fight Club is brilliant in the beginning with all that satire, but when it gets philosophical, I felt like I have seen this before.

5-0 out of 5 stars Famous Fight Club quote.
"F*** Martha Stewart. Martha's polishing the brass on the Titanic; it's all going down, man."

-- She just 5 months in prison and 5 months of home confinement. Isn't it wierd how much of this film has been almost prophetic?

5-0 out of 5 stars Outstanding commentaries
All the commentaries you could want, and they're all great. The actor's commentary is at least as entertaining as the film. ... Read more


40. Cabaret
Director: Bob Fosse
list price: $19.98
our price: $13.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00009Y3L4
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 1647
Average Customer Review: 4.34 out of 5 stars
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Description

A movie musical landmark that won eight Academy Awards(R)! Liza Minnelli and Joel Grey star in Bob Fosse's smashing film version of the Broadway hit set in pre-Nazi era Berlin. ... Read more

Reviews (89)

5-0 out of 5 stars Life is a cabaret, old chum...
It's often been said about old musical movies that they went too far in the conceit of people "bursting out in song" during a scene. Well, in his film version of Kander & Ebb's masterful Cabaret, Bob Fosse completely got around that problem by presenting the songs on stage. It was handled brilliantly, the choreography was incredible, and the movie just plain works.

Cabaret the movie doesn't share many songs in common with the original stage version - it still has "Willkommen," "Two Ladies," "Tomorrow Belongs To Me," a German version of "Married," "If You Could See Her," and "Cabaret" - but that's it. A few new songs were added - "Mein Herr," "Maybe This Time," "Money, Money," - but for the most part it's a lot less sung than the staged version. A lot of musical numbers dealing with the world outside the Kit Kat Klub were used as underscoring, preserving John Kander's great tunes. But this doesn't detract from it being one of the best filmed musicals out there.

Fosse's direction is a big help; it has a great eye for early 1930s Berlin, and presents the decadence and foreshadows the Nazis brilliantly. Fosse created great, sensual choreography for the film, and it is completely entrancing to watch the musical numbers. And the rest is worth it, too.

Flipflops aside, the couples are presented well; Liza Minelli's portrayal of Sally Bowles is definitely the acting part of a lifetime. She was just completely *convincing* as Sally, from end to end. Michael York as Brian is very reserved, very British, and very studied. Helmut Griem is entirely convincing as Max, who creates tension between the couple after befriending them. The secondary couple is played to perfection by Fritz Wepper and Marisa Berenson, as opportunistic Fritz Wendel who falls in love with the rich young Jewess Natalia Landauer, respectively. And, of course, Joel Grey is spectacular as the haunting, Puckish Emcee.

In general, this movie presents itself as a stunning revelation to viewers of a story that will stick around for a very long time. It's a virtuoso interpretation of one of the greatest American musicals, and deserves to be seen.

5-0 out of 5 stars wonderful new collector's edition
CABARET has never looked better, remastered for it's 25th anniversary, with additional features.

Liza Minnelli gives the performance of her career as the singer Sally Bowles, on a self-imposed exile in Berlin, entertaining at the seedy Kit Kat Klub.

Into her life comes Brian Roberts (Michael York), a mild-mannered English bisexual who falls in love with her. Both are seduced by the wealthy Maximillian (Helmut Griem) before Sally falls pregnant, aborts the child and Brian leaves Berlin just as the Nazi's gain power.

The musical, set against the stormy backdrop of Berlin in the 1930's, is a marvellous piece of film making. Directed and choreographed by maestro Bob Fosse, CABARET also boasts original Broadway performer Joel Grey as the Master of Ceremonies, and Fritz Wepper and Marisa Berenson.

Also includes reminiscences by Liza Minnelli, Joel Grey, Michael York, Cy Feuer, John Kander and others from the creative team, an old featurette on the making of the film, and the original theatrical trailer.

5-0 out of 5 stars THE BEST
As for musical-drama concerned... THIS IS IT! The producers of Chicago should have seen this(indeed they did - every major moment in that film is "stolen" from Cabaret) and put REAL musical stars in the film.

When u have Joel and Liza u are not let down... I give flowergreetings to the entire cast and crew... The filmversion of Cabaret has a lot of "new songs"(Maybe This Time, Mein Herr, The Money Song) and the plot follows the 1955-movie "I AM A CAMERA" more than the stage musical. Since then; the Liza-songs have found themselves in numerous revivals of this stageplay since this 1972-masterpiece. The film is still frightening and raw......Trivia: The scene in which Liza meets Marisa they talk about diseases... On video, here in Europe at least, that was cut....

4-0 out of 5 stars Don't pass on this
I almost passed over this DVD because a couple of Amazon reviewers forcefully complained about the presentation. I'm glad I bought it. The widescreen was just as I expected, and picture and sound quality were fine. Anyone who's seen the movie knows how good it is. If you haven't seen it, you're in for a treat; and this DVD serves it well. (A five-star review is for the absolutely superlative.)

1-0 out of 5 stars PLEASE PLEASE Don't buy this!
CABARET is one of the greatest movie musicals ever. I adore it. It is flawless, IMHO.
Why, then am I giving it one star? Because, as others have said, Warners should be ashamed of themselves. This is not the first, but the SECOND release of this movie in a non-anamorphic transfer. I bought the original and was mighty p****ed because it was non-anamorphic. I thought they would have honored this magnificent film in the "anniversary" release. But no. It is, as stated by another reviewer, the same disc as before, in terms of picture quality.
On a small TV you won't notice. But if you care about these things, then believe me, this release sucks big time. As did the first one.
I'm angry, not at being ripped off (I sent this one back for a refund) but because a wonderful work of art has been abused by a greedy, careless film company. And I have been robbed of the chance to see the film in its glory.
Having said that, nothing could improve the truly dreadful sound quality - which was terrible from day one.
I don't suppose there ever will be another release of this movie. What a terrible shame. ... Read more


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