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  • Radford, Michael
  • Radler, Robert
  • Radomski, Eric
  • Rafelson, Bob
  • Raffill, Stewart
  • Rafkin, Alan
  • Raimi, Sam
  • Ramis, Harold
  • Randel, Tony
  • Rao, Krishna
  • Rappaport, Mark
  • Rappeneau, Jean Paul
  • Rapper, Irving
  • Rash, Steve
  • Ratner, Brett
  • Rawlins, John
  • Ray, Fred Olen
  • Ray, Nicholas
  • Ray, Satyajit
  • Redford, Robert
  • Reed, Carol
  • Reiner, Carl
  • Reiner, Jeffrey
  • Reiner, Rob
  • Reisz, Karel
  • Reitman, Ivan
  • Renoir, Jean
  • Resnais, Alain
  • Reynolds, Burt
  • Reynolds, Gene
  • Reynolds, Kevin
  • Rhodes, Michael Ray
  • Ricci, Tonino
  • Rich, David Lowell
  • Rich, John
  • Rich, Richard
  • Richards, Cybil
  • Richardson, Tony
  • Richert, William
  • Ricker, Bruce
  • Riefenstahl, Leni
  • Rifkin, Adam
  • Ripley, Arthur
  • Ritchie, Michael
  • Ritt, Martin
  • Rivette, Jacques
  • Roach, Jay
  • Robbins, Brian
  • Robbins, Matthew
  • Robbins, Tim
  • Robe, Mike
  • Robinson, Bruce
  • Robinson, Phil Alden
  • Robson, Mark
  • Rocco, Marc
  • Rockwell, Alexandre
  • Roddam, Franc
  • Rodriguez, Robert
  • Roeg, Nicolas
  • Rohmer, Eric
  • Roley, Sutton
  • Romero, Eddie
  • Romero, George
  • Roper, Mark
  • Rose, Bernard
  • Rosen, Phil
  • Rosenberg, Stuart
  • Rosenfeld, Seth Zvi
  • Rosenthal, Rick
  • Rosi, Francesco
  • Rosman, Mark
  • Ross, Herbert
  • Rossellini, Roberto
  • Rossen, Robert
  • Roth, Bobby
  • Roth, Lynn
  • Rowland, Roy
  • Rozema, Patricia
  • Ruben, Joseph
  • Rudolph, Alan
  • Rudolph, Oscar
  • Ruiz, Raoul
  • Rush, Richard
  • Russell, Chuck
  • Russell, Ken
  • Rydell, Mark
  • Rye, Renny
  • Rymer, Michael
  • click price to see details     click image to enlarge     click link to go to the store

    $27.29 $26.99 list($38.99)
    1. The Andy Griffith Show - The Complete
    $19.49 $9.00 list($29.98)
    2. Meet The Fockers (Widescreen Edition)
    $18.87 $16.95 list($26.96)
    3. William Shakespeare's The Merchant
    $19.49 $12.87 list($29.98)
    4. Meet The Fockers (Full Screen
    $13.49 $4.68 list($14.99)
    5. Dreamscape
    $20.99 list($29.98)
    6. Meet the Parents (Widescreen Special
    $14.99 $13.68 list($19.98)
    7. The Princess Bride (Special Edition)
    $149.95
    8. Beckett on Film DVD Set
    $27.96 $20.48 list($34.95)
    9. Triumph of the Will (Special Edition)
    $14.98 $13.91 list($19.97)
    10. Caddyshack
    $19.58 list($27.97)
    11. Battlestar Galactica (2003 Miniseries)
    $20.96 $9.96 list($27.95)
    12. After the Sunset (Widescreen Edition)
    $22.49 $19.18 list($29.99)
    13. The Fox and the Hound (Disney
    $35.96 $27.21 list($39.95)
    14. La Belle Noiseuse
    $11.98 $9.15 list($14.98)
    15. Can't Buy Me Love
    $11.24 $9.54 list($14.99)
    16. American Dreamer
    $11.99 $9.52 list($14.99)
    17. The Bad News Bears
    $11.98 $9.32 list($14.98)
    18. The Inn of the Sixth Happiness
    $14.98 $9.33 list($19.98)
    19. Batteries Not Included
    $31.96 $24.20 list($39.95)
    20. My Favorite Martian - The Complete

    1. The Andy Griffith Show - The Complete Second Season
    list price: $38.99
    our price: $27.29
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B0007Y08P6
    Catlog: DVD
    Sales Rank: 29
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Description

    THE ANDY GRIFFITH SHOW - THE COMPLETE SECOND SEASON, is a comedy about a North Carolina widower named Andy Taylor who divides his time between raising his son, Opie (Ron Howard) and being sheriff of the small and virtually crime-free town of Mayberry.With next to no crimes to solve, Andy spends time philosophizing and trying to calm down his cousin, Deputy Barney, played by Don Knotts. ... Read more

    Reviews (29)

    5-0 out of 5 stars I don't want to make a big mulage, or anything
    this is a wonderful collection!Great quality--- love the "lost snippets" that we never see due to television chopping these up so painfully!My ONLY complaint is about the previews on Disc 1 -- First of all, why would ANYONE who loves TAGS want to see previews to McGyver and Charmed???? puuuuleeeeeeeease!Secondly, if they MUST put previews, WHY can't we at least fast-forward them?I think it was pretty low for the company to make the previews unable to be forwarded through-- low!

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Andy Griffith Show - The Complete Second Season
    For those that complain, about the 7 minutes of advertising - obviously you all don't have the kind of DVD player I have, because I had no problem hitting the fast forward button a few times to 4th speed and I'm there. I'm watching all the wonderful episodes, while everyone else is complaining. My suggestions get some cheese with your wine!
    Besides if you all think you can do a better job, by all means do it and stop complaining!

    5-0 out of 5 stars GREAT TV!!!!
    What A Wonderful Set!!! The Added Sponser Spots By The Cast Are Very Funny!!! Lots Of Great Guest Stars, & Terrific Episodes!!! Bill Bixby, Barbara Eden & Alan Hale!!! As For The Paramount Ads....WHO CARES!!!!!!! Ten Minutes Of Ads To Get A Season Full Of Warmth, Heart & Humor Seems Like A Small Price To Pay!!! Keep The Seasons Coming!!!!!!!!!

    5-0 out of 5 stars I'm not "forced" and I love the DVD!!!!
    I agree with David.I had little problem advancing passed the commercials, so I was not "forced" to watch any of them.Of course, Paramount could have been nice and left the commercials off, but their main concern is making money, and lots of it.The inconvience of spinning through the commercials (which takes me approximately 10 seconds) is nothing when compared to the rest of the DVD's content!This is easily the best situation comedy of all time and has never stopped being aired in the nearly 45 years since it first ran on CBS.This DVD will be highlighted in my DVD collection, just as season one is.I especially like the added "original sponsor spots",many of which I don't remember ever seeing before.Does anyone know if these "spots" ran during the first season of the show?If so, I hope they tag them on to the season three set along with the season three spots.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Commercialism Destroys The Enjoyment of Mayberry
    Paramount Studios (owned by Viacom) has taken their commercialism to an all time low.The Andy Griffith Show has been one of my favorite, most relaxing shows for many years.I purchased the complete 2nd season, anticipating laughs and relaxation.But, hold on.Paramount forces the viewer to sit through at least 10 MINUTES of advertisements on disc one - you cannot fast forward through it - you cannot switch to the top menu.The viewer must endure 10 miserable minutes, watching advertisements for other DVD's (which many of us have no interest in).This was not done on the complete first season.I'm seriously considering the return of this DVD set - I do not like to be exploited / forced to endure 10 unending minutes of commercial trash.I don't even watch regular TV - to avoid commercials.What a shame.What a shame that such a materialistic, moronic company owns the rights to The Andy Griffith Show.This has taught me to avoid ALL Paramount DVD's in the future.Burn me once, shame on you - there will not be a second time.

    Comments / complaints can be sent to:



    Paramount Studios
    5555 Melrose Avenue
    Hollywood, CA 90038

    323.956.5000

    ...Tom ... Read more


    2. Meet The Fockers (Widescreen Edition)
    Director: Jay Roach
    list price: $29.98
    our price: $19.49
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00005JN5T
    Catlog: DVD
    Sales Rank: 40
    Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Amazon.com

    Meet the Parents found such tremendous success in the chemistry produced by the contrasting personalities of stars Robert De Niro and Ben Stiller that the film's creators went for broke with the same formula again in Meet the Fockers. This time around, Jack and Dina Byrnes (De Niro and Blythe Danner) climb into Jack's new kevlar-lined RV with daughter Pam (Teri Polo), soon-to-be son-in-law Gaylord (Stiller), and Jack's infant grandson from his other daughter for the trip to Florida to meet Gaylord's parents, Bernie and Roz Focker (Dustin Hoffman and Barbra Streisand in a casting coup). The potential in-laws are, of course, the opposite of Jack, a pair of randy, touchy-feely fun-lovers. The rest of the movie is pretty much a sitcom: put Bernie and Roz together with Jack, and watch the in-laws clash as Gaylord squirms. As with the original, there is a sense of joy in watching these actors take on their roles with obvious relish, and the Hoffman-Streisand-Stiller triumvirate is likeable enough to draw you in. But the formula doesn't work as well in Fockers mostly because much of the humor is based on two obvious gimmicks: Gaylord Focker's name, and the fact that Streisand's character is a sex therapist. As a result, the movie itself is more contrived and predictable, and a lot less fun than the original. The casting is grand, but one wishes more thought was put into the script.--Dan Vancini ... Read more

    Reviews (189)

    1-0 out of 5 stars Since the movie is so impossibly boring...
    and cliché, and predictable and tongue-in-cheek, and trited, and mindless, I'm going to summarize this movie as:
    Utter Waste of Money and Time.
    There's nothing, and I mean absolutely nothing positive to say about this movie. They were pushing it with the first one, however, it was passable and watchable. This sequel is one that should have never put out. It's so enclosed in its idiocy that it obfuscates the acting value of thespians of great caliber. Avoid!

    4-0 out of 5 stars Don't Believe the Negativity...It's Hilarious
    I'm so tired of everyone looking for Shakespearian perfection in every film, bottom line, it's a dumb comedy, so turn your pompous search for meaningful dialogue and great script-writing
    off and enjoy the laughs. It's a comedy, not Macbeth. I kept hearing how horrible it was, well guess what, surprise, surprise
    the critics were wrong again! If you enjoyed the first film, you'll love the second, it was every bit as funny, if not funnier. I don't laugh easy either, but it had me rolling most of the film, in tears laughing at times. I know when to be critical and when to put the brain on pause and just enjoy a good old fashioned laugh. It has that Farelly Brothers-type gross out humor, if you enjoy that sort of thing which I do, then you'll enjoy this. If not, go rent 'Annie Hall,' and spend needless hours pining over the film's lighting and set direction, you know, 'the important things in film'...rolls eyes.

    1-0 out of 5 stars please, not a third time!
    Gee, it's pretty sad to see actors of this caliber, who've been in so many memorable movies, get mired in this kind of horrible dreck.

    But, this is what really offended me:in "Meet the Parents" there was one trained animal to provide a few cute jokes.In this sequel, not only did they feel the need to throw in a pathetic looking dogfor a few more "America's Funniest Videos" style laughs, they effectively used a child in the role of a third "trained animal".Sick.They must have figured that it worked well with "Mini-Me" in the "Austin Powers" sequel, so why not stick Robert DeNiro with a similar sidekick?The people who made this movie deserve a swift kick (or two) in the pants.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Clash of the Icons
    Moviegoers flocked to "Meet the Fockers," making this star-studded sequel to "Meet the Parents" a box-office smash. Now that Gaylord "Greg" Focker (Ben Stiller) and his fiancée Pam Byrnes (Teri Polo) are finally getting married, it's time for Pam's conservative parents (Robert De Niro and Blythe Danner) to meet Greg's freewheeling parents (Dustin Hoffman and Barbra Streisand). De Niro is once again terrific as Jack Byrnes, the suspicious ex-CIA operative (though Jack's obsession with the "circle of trust" has grown a bit tiresome). Stiller reprises one of his most humorous--and appealing--screen personas as the beleaguered male nurse. Hoffman gives the films best performance as Bernie Focker, a frisky lawyer-turned-househusband and Streisand is especially funny as Roz Focker, a straightforward sex therapist for seniors. Blythe Danner and Teri Polo are wonderful in their supporting roles and Owen Wilson's cameo appearance is a hoot. The DVD extras include deleted scenes, bloopers, and a Matt Lauer interview with the cast.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Total Mind Pollution... I would rather not give any stars
    Listen to the people who didn't like this movie.I LOVED the first movie and watched it several times.The first movie had some crudeness in it, but most of the humor was just plain funny.This movie was nothing but crudeness and I think my IQ went down just by sitting through it.If you enjoyed this movie, you are extremely immature.There are some very funny movies out there, they just don't need to be as crude as this one.I think I only laughed once during the movie and I don't even remember when that was because most of the time I was sitting there debating on whether or not I should just turn the movie off. ... Read more


    3. William Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice
    Director: Michael Radford
    list price: $26.96
    our price: $18.87
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B0007WRT4Q
    Catlog: DVD
    Sales Rank: 72
    Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Amazon.com

    Rarely has The Merchant of Venice, one of Shakespeare's most complex plays, looked as ravishingly sumptuous as in this adaptation, directed by Michael Radford (Il Postino). In a decadent version of renaissance Venice, a young nobleman named Bassanio (Joseph Fiennes, Shakespeare in Love) seeks to woo the lovely Portia (newcomer Lynn Collins), but lacks the money to travel to her estate. He seeks support from his friend, the merchant Antonio (Jeremy Irons, Reversal of Fortune); Antonio's fortune is tied up in sea ventures, so the merchant offers to borrow money from a Jewish moneylender, Shylock (Al Pacino, Dog Day Afternoon). But Shylock holds a grudge against Antonio, who has routinely treated the Jew with contempt, and demands that if the debt is not repaid in three months, the price will be a pound of Antonio's flesh.

    The Merchant of Venice is famous as a "problem play"--the gritty matters of moneylending and anti-Semitism sit uncomfortably beside the fairy tale elements of Portia and Bassanio's romance, and some twists of the plot can seem arbitrary or even cruel. The strength of Radford's intelligent and passionate interpretation is that he and the excellent cast invest the play's opposing facets with full emotional weight, thus making every question the play raises acute and inescapable. Irons is particularly compelling; kindness and blind prejudice sit side by side in his breast, rendering the clashes in his character as vivid as those in the play itself. --Bret Fetzer ... Read more

    Reviews (38)

    4-0 out of 5 stars "How Sweet the Moonlight Sleeps"
    This is, generally, a very satisfying filming of a very problematic play.Director Radford, who also adapted the screenplay, deserves credit for his bold choices in casting and for his not shying away from some of the more troublesome aspects of the text.Is Pacino a successful Shylock?I think so, although by way of Brooklyn.He is especially powerful in the famous courtroom scene, which otherwise comes dangerously close to being exploitative on the screen.There is much to recommend here, including a stellar supporting cast.Few actors can hold their own next to Pacino, but Lynn Collins comes close.After an unfortunate entrance as the young lawyer (she looks uncomfortably like Sonny Chiba), Collins makes us forget the incongruities in her role and attend, instead, to Portia's masterful polemics.The quality of makeup is not strained!(Collins, by the way, is an actress from Texas, but this does not become an issue.She has been linked romantically with Keanu Reeves, her costar in "Il Mare."Perhaps these two will at some point treat us to a film of "Anthony and Cleopatra"?--another of Shakespeare's plays that has been criminally neglected by Hollywood.)Other actors worthy of mention are MacKenzie Crook and Ron Cook as the younger and older Gobbos, and Kris Marshall and John Sessions as Gratiano and Salerio.Heather ("Kinsey") Goldenhersh as Nerissa and Allan Corduner as Tubal are also fine.Several up-and-coming young actors appear in supporting roles, including Tony Schiena, Julian Nest, and Tom Leick, who is soon to be seen in "House of Boys," with a screenplay by J.T. LeRoy.

    I have given the film 4 stars, but I would like to give the DVD itself 5. Watching the film, I had many questions for the director--for instance, why are certain scenes deleted, while others are out of sequence?--and I'm happy to say that most all of these are answered in the delightful director's commentary, for which Michael Radford is joined by Lynn Collins.I learned a lot about the rationale behind certain casting and directorial choices and came to appreciate the film itself better as a result.For example, the director has choreographed certain scenes to reflect a love triangle among Antonio, Portia, and Bassanio, something that is heavily debated in Shakespearan criticism.Radford even gives us a rationale for his having asked the actresses playing prostitutes to appear with their breasts exposed!See this film, certainly; it has many qualities to recommend it, not the least of which are a lovely soundtrack by Jocelyn Pook and location filming in both Venice and Luxemburg.But, to get the whole experience, see it on DVD and then watch the director's commentary.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Not Bad
    Good sets.Good costumes.Al appears to be reading from cue cards off camera in some scenes, although I think he plays a believable part. I wish Jeremy could speak up a little. No subtitles in English, only French; kinda dumb isn't it?

    3-0 out of 5 stars Pacino and Shakespeare save this movie from itself
    Shakespeare's lines will carry any movie above the waterline, and the same can be said of Pacino's acting. They both make this movie presentable and even excellent at times. However, the angle of the movie seems to be one of contradiction to the text, beginning with the introductory text prior to the film's dialogue (text from the Director NOT Shakespeare). This text attempts to excuse the very play itself for its characterization of Christians and the Jew, Shylock. If the play needed an intro, Shakespeare would have written a prologue. It certainly works to bias the audience in a way. The other attempt to do this is several scenes where the "Christian" characters are carousing in a bawdy house with a bunch of half-naked prostitutes. Clearly, the director attempts to make a martyr of Shylock and hypocrites of all the non-Jew characters: however Shakespeare's text is what it is. The nudity is utterly unnecessary and detracts from the integrity of the play--plus it cannot now be shown to young people.

    Other than those detractions, I think the film is excellent. The trial scene is superb and brings the tension of the moment to life. Besides Pacino the other actors do a fine job. Unfortunately, though I am a lover of Shakespeare, I would not want to watch this again.

    Author of "Shakespeare on Spirituality: Life-Changing Wisdom from Shakespeare's Plays"

    3-0 out of 5 stars gratuitous nudity
    While this film is a relatively accurate and well acted version of the Shakespeare play, it has nudity in it where none is called for. This makes it unusable in the American classroom and cheapens the play itself.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Great production of a play that is hard to like!
    This is an outstanding production of the one work of Shakespeare that is the most difficult to like.It is impossible to get around the anti-Semitism.This production tries very hard to put the anti-Semitism in context and I think to tone it down, but in the end it is impossible to eliminate it.To some extent Shylock is being punished for being vindictive and not showing mercy, but it is impossible to ignore that in the end the play seems to celebrate Shylock's foced conversion to Christianity.

    Al Pacino's performance is disconcerting as he seems to be playing Shylock with a New Yawk accent.But Lynne Collins is truly oustanding as Portia.This version of Merchant really shines in the comic portion of the story where Portia masquerades as a man and successfully entreats Bassanio to give up his wedding ring (which he had earlier promised Portia he would never part with).This is one of the few Shakespearean productions I have seen where a woman masquerading as a man is actually credible.

    The settings, costumes, and photography are all spectacular.I found I was able to focus on the positive elements and not get bogged down with the more distressing parts of the plot.But I sympathize with those who find the anti-Semitic aspects of the story too distressing. ... Read more


    4. Meet The Fockers (Full Screen Edition)
    Director: Jay Roach
    list price: $29.98
    our price: $19.49
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B0007UM8WG
    Catlog: DVD
    Sales Rank: 130
    Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Amazon.com

    Meet the Parents found such tremendous success in the chemistry produced by the contrasting personalities of stars Robert De Niro and Ben Stiller that the film's creators went for broke with the same formula again in Meet the Fockers. This time around, Jack and Dina Byrnes (De Niro and Blythe Danner) climb into Jack's new kevlar-lined RV with daughter Pam (Teri Polo), soon-to-be son-in-law Gaylord (Stiller), and Jack's infant grandson from his other daughter for the trip to Florida to meet Gaylord's parents, Bernie and Roz Focker (Dustin Hoffman and Barbra Streisand in a casting coup). The potential in-laws are, of course, the opposite of Jack, a pair of randy, touchy-feely fun-lovers. The rest of the movie is pretty much a sitcom: put Bernie and Roz together with Jack, and watch the in-laws clash as Gaylord squirms. As with the original, there is a sense of joy in watching these actors take on their roles with obvious relish, and the Hoffman-Streisand-Stiller triumvirate is likeable enough to draw you in. But the formula doesn't work as well in Fockers mostly because much of the humor is based on two obvious gimmicks: Gaylord Focker's name, and the fact that Streisand's character is a sex therapist. As a result, the movie itself is more contrived and predictable, and a lot less fun than the original. The casting is grand, but one wishes more thought was put into the script.--Dan Vancini ... Read more

    Reviews (189)

    1-0 out of 5 stars Since the movie is so impossibly boring...
    and cliché, and predictable and tongue-in-cheek, and trited, and mindless, I'm going to summarize this movie as:
    Utter Waste of Money and Time.
    There's nothing, and I mean absolutely nothing positive to say about this movie. They were pushing it with the first one, however, it was passable and watchable. This sequel is one that should have never put out. It's so enclosed in its idiocy that it obfuscates the acting value of thespians of great caliber. Avoid!

    4-0 out of 5 stars Don't Believe the Negativity...It's Hilarious
    I'm so tired of everyone looking for Shakespearian perfection in every film, bottom line, it's a dumb comedy, so turn your pompous search for meaningful dialogue and great script-writing
    off and enjoy the laughs. It's a comedy, not Macbeth. I kept hearing how horrible it was, well guess what, surprise, surprise
    the critics were wrong again! If you enjoyed the first film, you'll love the second, it was every bit as funny, if not funnier. I don't laugh easy either, but it had me rolling most of the film, in tears laughing at times. I know when to be critical and when to put the brain on pause and just enjoy a good old fashioned laugh. It has that Farelly Brothers-type gross out humor, if you enjoy that sort of thing which I do, then you'll enjoy this. If not, go rent 'Annie Hall,' and spend needless hours pining over the film's lighting and set direction, you know, 'the important things in film'...rolls eyes.

    1-0 out of 5 stars please, not a third time!
    Gee, it's pretty sad to see actors of this caliber, who've been in so many memorable movies, get mired in this kind of horrible dreck.

    But, this is what really offended me:in "Meet the Parents" there was one trained animal to provide a few cute jokes.In this sequel, not only did they feel the need to throw in a pathetic looking dogfor a few more "America's Funniest Videos" style laughs, they effectively used a child in the role of a third "trained animal".Sick.They must have figured that it worked well with "Mini-Me" in the "Austin Powers" sequel, so why not stick Robert DeNiro with a similar sidekick?The people who made this movie deserve a swift kick (or two) in the pants.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Clash of the Icons
    Moviegoers flocked to "Meet the Fockers," making this star-studded sequel to "Meet the Parents" a box-office smash. Now that Gaylord "Greg" Focker (Ben Stiller) and his fiancée Pam Byrnes (Teri Polo) are finally getting married, it's time for Pam's conservative parents (Robert De Niro and Blythe Danner) to meet Greg's freewheeling parents (Dustin Hoffman and Barbra Streisand). De Niro is once again terrific as Jack Byrnes, the suspicious ex-CIA operative (though Jack's obsession with the "circle of trust" has grown a bit tiresome). Stiller reprises one of his most humorous--and appealing--screen personas as the beleaguered male nurse. Hoffman gives the films best performance as Bernie Focker, a frisky lawyer-turned-househusband and Streisand is especially funny as Roz Focker, a straightforward sex therapist for seniors. Blythe Danner and Teri Polo are wonderful in their supporting roles and Owen Wilson's cameo appearance is a hoot. The DVD extras include deleted scenes, bloopers, and a Matt Lauer interview with the cast.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Total Mind Pollution... I would rather not give any stars
    Listen to the people who didn't like this movie.I LOVED the first movie and watched it several times.The first movie had some crudeness in it, but most of the humor was just plain funny.This movie was nothing but crudeness and I think my IQ went down just by sitting through it.If you enjoyed this movie, you are extremely immature.There are some very funny movies out there, they just don't need to be as crude as this one.I think I only laughed once during the movie and I don't even remember when that was because most of the time I was sitting there debating on whether or not I should just turn the movie off. ... Read more


    5. Dreamscape
    Director: Joseph Ruben
    list price: $14.99
    our price: $13.49
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 6305869103
    Catlog: DVD
    Sales Rank: 5190
    Average Customer Review: 3.37 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Amazon.com

    Alex Gardner (Dennis Quaid) is a talented young psychic who's frittering his gifts away betting on the ponies. That is, until he's coerced by his old pal and mentor Dr. Paul Novotny (Max von Sydow) into taking part in a dream research project in which his psychic abilities make him indispensable. The project concerns "dreamlinking," whereby talented individuals like Alex hook up via electrodes and project themselves into some troubled subject's nightmares, in which they not only observe butparticipate in the dream, hopefully effecting some remedy. Alex is by nature a feckless guy, a charismatic scoundrel sporting a Cheshire cat's grin. But he warms easily to his new role as dream-dwelling psychotherapist, having a core of decency. Not so his nemesis, Tommy Ray Glatman (David Patrick Kelly), a dreamlink prodigy and pawn of Bob Blair (Christopher Plummer), who runs the research project for the government (he's described as the "head of covert intelligence"). Blair is worried about the President (Eddie Albert), whose nightmares of nuclear holocaust cause him to escalate disarmament talks with the Russians, much to Blair's dismay, being your basic evil, slick, smarmy covert kind of guy. Turns out Blair's real aim is to use the project to train dreamlink assassins, his star pupil being psycho Tommy Ray and his test case the President. Only Alex is there to stop them.

    Dreamscape is all business, with a well-structured screenplay that lays the groundwork for the film's many admirable performances. Kate Capshaw in particular is very dreamy as a research scientist and Dennis Quaid's love interest. And David Patrick Kelly is likely to become your worst nightmare, especially when he's the Snakeman, giving an often fantastical performance. But what you're most likely to remember from this wonderful thriller is the many vivid dream sequences, aptly surreal images from the troubled psyche. --Jim Gay ... Read more

    Reviews (19)

    2-0 out of 5 stars Eighties sci-fi/Thriller doesn't hold up...at all!
    I saw this during the eighties when it originally came out and thought it was terrific and scary. However, this movie does not hold up at all. It's not just the technological advancements in special effects that makes this movie so dated, afterall movies like "The Thing" and "The Exorcist" came out before this. A scary movie is scary no matter when it came out. This movie is just silly. The president's fear of nuclear war is treated so brazenly that it doesn't hold up now that the Day After decade is over. The story is so brisk in the extreme nothing is giving time to develop. Only the ideas are presented and not explored. Quaid and Sydow are good but even they can't save this movie. The dialog is very stilted at parts. Christopher Plummer is just silly, not menacing. Tommy Ray isn't scary any more. The snake man looks so rubbery and stupid that I can't believe I was ever scared of it in the first place. They did a terrible job with it. The transformation effects are now laughable. They didn't have to be. Kate Capshaw is awful (she always was; maybe that's one of the reasons you don't see her in much anymore now that she is married to Spielberg). This is just not that strong a movie and time has not been kind to it. I thought it was great when I was 10 but it just isn't scary or fun. Awful music by Maurice Jarre. Not because it is an electronic eighties keyboard soundtrack like Jerry Goldsmith's Runaway. No this is just bad and it sounds bad on this DVD. No themes develop and even the chase music is boring. Very weak. Similar genre movies from the eighties that hold up and you might want to check out instead: Twilight Zone the Movie, Gremlins, Poltergeist, Brainstorm, Fright Night.

    DVD-This dvd is also not very good either. The picture quality is very crisp most of the time. There is some wavering in some scenes. The special effects unfortuneately don't benefit from all that detail in picture quality. The worst part is the sound. It comes in DTS and Dolby Digital. It is hardly 5.1 like the box advertises. Occasionally you get some weak directional effects. But for I would say 80% of the movie everything is in the center speaker.

    The best thing about this DVD is the menus. They were a pleasant surprise. The movie and this DVD were not.

    5-0 out of 5 stars What a fun movie!
    This movie is kind of obscure to most but it's still an exceptional film. Dennis Quaid was pre-Inner Space, pre-Dragonheart and was sort of on the threshold of being one of the more fun and interesting actors of our time. This was also an overshadowed film by the mega horror spectacle "A Nightmare on Elm Street" but it's still great fun to enjoy. Very imaginative and different. The dream sequences were phenominal for the time when this film came out. Sort of an Indiana Jones meets Jacobs Ladder. With the exception of a weak ending and geeky special effects it's a great story and one that should be a addition to any collection. Enjoy!

    3-0 out of 5 stars I have a dream...for an unedited version...
    Do you ever remember your dreams? I rarely do...unless they are of the really intense kind and I wake up during the dream, and even then the images tend to slip from my conscious like grains of sand through your hand. Why am I bothering telling you this? Well, I needed some kind of opener for my review of Dreamscape (1984), a film that deals with dreams and such, and this was the best I could come up with at the time, lame as it may be...directed by Joseph Ruben, who later did Sleeping with the Enemy (1991) and Money Train (1995), Dreamscape presents quite a cast with Dennis Quaid, Max Von Sydow, Christopher Plummer, Kate Capshaw, Eddie Albert, and even George Wendt (Norm!).

    Dennis Quaid plays Alex Gardner, a young man of fantastic psychic abilities who has since dropped off the radar, preferring to use his 'gifts' to manipulate women and pick winners at the horse track, rather than continuing to subject himself to an endless series of tests meant to study and learn of his abilities, tests conducted by Doctor Paul Novotny (Von Sydow). Seemingly content to squander his skills, Alex's path once again leads him back to Dr. Novotny and his assistant, Jane DeVries (Capshaw) as they've developed a machine that would allow someone with Alex's talents to enter the dreams of others, and possibly help those plagued with reoccurring nightmares, specifically in the President (Albert) who is suffering from apocalyptic dreams that are beginning to affect his ability to do his job. Seemingly concerned with the President's well being, Bob Blair (Plummer), government head of Dr. Novotny's project and shadowy leader of an intelligence group even the CIA fears requests Dr. Novotny assist in relieving the President of these nightmares, but we soon learn he has other plans, plans of a sinister nature involving another, less stable psychic within the project by the name of Tommy Ray Glatman (David Patrick Kelly). Can Alex uncover the plot, help the President, and stay alive? Possibly, but the odds are certainly against him...

    Given some of the films that came out in 1984 like Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, Ghostbusters, Amadeus, Footloose, Romancing the Stone, Starman, A Passage to India, and The Killing Fields, it's no surprise this 'sleeper' got lost in the shuffle. I've always enjoyed it, and thought it deserved a bit more credit than it's gotten. Dennis Quaid is really good and charming as hell as the smart alecky Alex Gardner, a character who seems to be able to handle himself, yet exhibits a smidgen of naiveté which possibly stems from a core belief of decency, despite his ventures into gray areas, specifically using his skills to determine winners of horse races, earning him money to live. Max Von Sydow is also very good, although I feel as if I've seen him in similar roles so many times before, as a doctor involved in ground-breaking research, not being able to see the forces which conspire to use his research for their own, sinister means until it's too late. As far as Kate Capshaw, I have to admit I've never cared for her all that much as I found her character in Temple of Doom to be highly annoying and distracting. She's not bad here, even though she does suffer from a common malady of the 80's here in big-hairitis syndrome. Plummer is good as the conniving powerful government agent with a secret agenda, although I've seen this whole 'evil government stealing research meant for the good of mankind for it's own corrupted means' theme about a thousand times before. Even so, he's perfectly suited for the part, oozing a smarmy, almost quiet charm that hides disturbing ulterior motives...I did like the aspect that his goals were driven mostly by his desire to protect what he thought needed protecting, even if he was misguided by his own sense of twisted patriotism.

    The special effects, while seeming quite dated now, were actually very good for the time this film came out, especially the dream sequences of the President detailing post-apocalyptic visions of decimated cities and ruinous wastes. The stop motion work, while not really appreciated by many, is really pretty good and reminds me of those old Ray Harryhausen films I love so much. One thing that annoyed me the most about this release is what's missing due to a hack editing job on a few scenes, all within dream sequences, I suppose, to more aptly fit the movie's PG-13 rating. One scene involved Quaid and Capshaw and a romantic interlude on a train with some pretty steamy stuff, but here it's cut short, removing the nudity. A second edited scene had Quaid inside a mousy man's dream about his wife, which contained some nudity that was excised out of here, and finally another scene has to do with Quaid's character helping a little boy overcome a terrifying reoccurring nightmare about a monstrous snake man. The part removed had a bit of gore in it, but it certainly wasn't anything, in my opinion, that deserved to be removed.

    It says the movie is available in full and widescreen anamorphic formats, but I only saw the widescreen available. The picture quality is pretty good, but the transfer print does suffer very minor age deterioration at some points, but it's hardly noticeable. The audio is much better, with Dolby Digital 2.0, new Dolby Digital 5.1 and DTS 5.1 Audio available. Special features include an audio commentary track by producer Bruce Cohn Curtis, writer David Loughery, and special effects artist Craig Reardon that's pretty good, although dry at more than a few points. Also included are a behind the scenes special effects makeup test reel and a slide show. I really wanted to give this four stars, but given that's it missing parts from a few scenes, I have to go with three...

    Cookieman108

    4-0 out of 5 stars Dream A Little Dream
    Dreamscape is a solid little sci-fi film, that thanks to good casting, rises above its problems.

    Alex Gardner (Dennis Quaid) is a gifted young man, endowed with strong psychic powers, so far, he has only used his abilities to win money at the track. All that changes, when his former mentor, Dr. Novotny (Max von Sydow) and his lovely assistant (Kate Capshaw), recruit him to aid patients disturbed by their dreams. When a corrupt goverment official (Christopher Plummer)discovers what Alex can do, he has more sinister plans in mind--that involve the President Of The United States (Eddie Albert)

    Director Joseph Ruben gets the most from a strong cast. Quaid is pitch perfect as Alex, and gives what I think is, one of his best perfomances of his lopsided career. Plummer is at his best when playing a heavy, von Sydow is also tops here as well. Capshaw, on the other hand, is only serviceable, but thankfully, not as annoying as she is in Indiana Jones And The Temple Of Doom. The script from David (Star Trek V) Loughery has a few hiccups in it, and even though some of the story seems like its right out Stephen King's The Dead Zone--the problems are minor and not that big of a deal. The special effects are a bit chessey at times, but I can overlook that as well. As I said, the performances make the film work, above all else.

    The DVD has a fine audio commentary track with producer Bruce Cohn Curtis, Loughery, and special effects artist Craig Reardon, giving their perspectives on how the movie came together--I wish Quaid could have joined in as well though for an actor's take. A behind-the-scenes special effects makeup test reel and a still gallery top off the bonus material.

    Dreamscape is worth a look and is better than the DVD cover art would have you believe. It's a step above, and then some, from a B grade flick.

    4-0 out of 5 stars original movie!
    I saw the film now for the first time and were very surprised with the argument. A lot of parts are very similar to the "Elm Street" movies, which began one year later, even the knife-fingernails of the murderer, but especially that all victims were killed in their dreams.
    I agree with the other reviews, the film has great performanes.
    On the other hand there're a lot of mistakes and contradictions in the argument. For example, the last victim (the bad guy from the government) is killed although the protagonist is far away and can't influence his dream. But all in all I think you'll not loose your time seeing this movie, especially if you're a great science fiction/horror fan. ... Read more


    6. Meet the Parents (Widescreen Special Edition)
    Director: Jay Roach
    list price: $29.98
    our price: $20.99
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    Asin: B00049QLSC
    Catlog: DVD
    Sales Rank: 1068
    Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (368)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Full blown comedy with a killer cast
    Meet the Parents is one of the best comedy movies to hit the shelves in recent years. With an all-star cast including Ben Stiller, Robert DeNiro, and the one and only Owen Wilson, this movie delivers the laughs perfectly!

    Greg Focker, male nurse, is about to propose to Pam, his "special friend" of ten months, when he hears about her recently engaged sitster, whose husband to be made the right move and asked her father first. Now he's got to do the same, which means he's got to meet the parents. And with the plot set, the laughter ensues...

    What really makes this movie work is the characters we can all relate to. First there's Greg, who is desperately trying to win the parents' approval, but somehow manages to screw up everything he possibly can along the way. And to make matters worse, he's got to to deal with Pam's ex fiance while he carries out this death sentence of a weekend. And then there is Pam, whose father is well...just a little strange to say the least.

    Also, Owen Wilson is just insane in this and the movie is worth it for his performance alone, not to mention being able to see DeNiro do a comedy this good.

    See it for the laughs, see it for the cast, see it for the experience, because this is one of the best lately. And if that is not insentive enough, I leave you with a quote..."Well I have nipples Focker, could you milk ME?"

    2-0 out of 5 stars Skip This Meeting
    Stale, unoriginal humor is the downfall of this take-it-or-leave-it Ben Stiller comedy. Stiller plays male nurse Gaylord Focker (whose name is the inspiration for at least a quarter of the movie's jokes), a hapless soul whose attempts to propose to his girlfriend (Teri Polo) are interrupted by a phone call announcing her sister's engagement. This leads to the wedding trip, and Stiller's opportunity to meet the parents.

    What follows are a series of mildly amusing situations and one-liners, none of which you'll probably be itching to repeat at work tomorrow. Owen Wilson is a bright spot, as usual, playing Polo's ex-fiance. He also delivers the best line in the movie, a deadpan joke about the inspiration for his hobby, carpentry. Robert DeNiro and Blythe Danner, however, are both too woefully underchallenged to be able to turn in memorable performances.

    The DVD's extra features include the standard outtakes, commentaries, and deleted scenes, as well as interactive personality quizzes which are fun to take but whose answers seem somewhat random. Overall, Meet the Parents is only worth renting if you're desperate to see a movie and this is the just about only thing left on the video store shelves.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Calamity after calamity - Very Funny
    "Meet the Parents" is funny, outrageous, and full of fun. Pratfalls and pitfalls await our comic star Ben Stiller as he pursues his love and ingratiates himself with his father-in-law to-be, Robert DeNiro. DeNiro is a crazed, over protective, retired CIA agent who zealously protects his daughter from her would-be suitor.

    Calamity follows calamity, and the sight gags cascade until the end unwinds all the zaniness in a satisfying ending. It is a lot of fun with several belly laughs thrown in for good measure.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Oh no, no, no, no, no, it's not very good. Way over rated.
    This movie is not funny, just dumb. Is saying "focker" over and over and over again really that funny? I'm sorry, folks, but NO, it's just not all that funny, and this is the same dull plot that we've seen over and over again in the movies and on tv. Not recommended.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Unwatchable
    I wanted to leave the theater halfway through this garbage but I already ponied up my $8. Predictable gag after predictable gag after predictable gag, this movie made me hate Ben Stiller. ... Read more


    7. The Princess Bride (Special Edition)
    Director: Rob Reiner
    list price: $19.98
    our price: $14.99
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    Asin: B00005LOKQ
    Catlog: DVD
    Sales Rank: 109
    Average Customer Review: 4.69 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (664)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Rob Reiner Weaves His Best In Fanatsy!
    THE PRINCESS BRIDE is directors Rob Reiner (A Few Good Men, Stand By Me) third feature film ever. It was based on a book written by Academy Award Winner William Goldwin (Misery, Maverick, Chaplin) who wrote this book for his children in 1973. After almost 15 years, and several studios, MGM decided to back it up and make the finished film.

    It fun, it's funny and has adventure and romance, monsters and villains. It also has some of the best performances of an ensemble cast in a fairy tale ever. Robin Write-Penn (Then Robin Write at 19 years old) (Forrest Gump, Unbreakable) starring as Princess Buttercup who has fallen in love with a farm boy-turned Pirate, Cary Elwes (Twister, Robin Hood: Men In Tights, Quest For Camelot) and is seeking the kidnapped Princess from three renegades played by Wallace Shawn (Toy Story, Star Trek Deep Space Nine). The late Andre The Giant (Trading Mom) and an astounding performance by Mandy Patikin (Yentel, Alien Nation, Chicago Hope-TV ). Christopher Sarandon (Nightmare Before Christmas, Fright Night, Just Cause) and Christopher Guest (This Is Spinal Tap, Best In Show) head up the evil King and sidekick roles. The chemistry between Cary and Mandy is phenomenal. They are seriously funny in a sarcastic and monotoned way. The swordplay is the best I have seen since Errol Flynn.

    What makes this movie special and energetic is the magic of fantasy with a splash of you have to believe in True Love for all this to work and for your happiness to be real. Shot entirely on location and with a minimum of a budget the movie is wonderful to watch and look at. A GEM for all the family - literally.

    The DVD extras include three behind the scenes documentaries and lots of production photos. Very well put together and filled with interesting comments and antique dotes from all the cast and crew. There's even a behind the scenes home movie view of the production thanks to Carry Elwis himself. Of the trailers and production posters show you more of movie making and what it takes. The audio commentary by Rob Reiner is comical and very interesting. There is also a commentary by William Goldwin which gives you a lot of insighjt to the production. This is a great addition to the family film collection. (10-27-02)

    5-0 out of 5 stars "My name is Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die!"


    Director: Rob Reiner
    Format: Color
    Studio: Mgm/Ua Studios
    Video Release Date: March 7, 2000

    Cast:

    Cary Elwes ... Westley
    Mandy Patinkin ... Inigo Montoya
    Chris Sarandon ... Prince Humperdinck
    Christopher Guest ... Count Tyrone Rugen
    Wallace Shawn ... Vizzini
    André the Giant ... Fezzik
    Fred Savage ... The Grandson
    Robin Wright Penn ... Buttercup/The Princess Bride
    Peter Falk ... The Grandfather
    Peter Cook ... The Impressive Clergyman
    Mel Smith ... The Albino

    Carol Kane ... Valerie
    Billy Crystal ... Miracle Max
    Anne Dyson ... The Queen
    Margery Mason ... The Ancient Booer
    Malcolm Storry ... Yellin
    Willoughby Gray ... The King
    Betsy Brantley ... The Mother
    Paul Badger ... The Assistant Brute
    Sallie McLaughlin

    A storybook stable boy turns pirate and rescues his beloved who is about to marry a dreadful prince.

    The story is told by the Grandfather (Peter Falk) to his cynical (at first) Grandson (Fred Savage).

    The story is a love story with all of the elements of a fantasy fairy tale. Westley (Cary Elwes), the good guy, is opposed by Inigo Montoya (Mandy Patinkin--"My name is Inigo Montoya, you killed my father. Be prepared to die!"), at first, and then wins Westley's admiration. Another opponent who becomes a co-conspirator, is Fezzick (Andre the Giant). Buttercup/The Princess Bride (Robin Wright Penn) is the princess who needs rescuing.

    There is a lot of good tongue-in-cheek humor involved, and even though it is understood that this is a story told to a young boy, there is nevertheless a good level of tension involved.

    This is a fun movie.

    Joseph (Joe) Pierre

    author of Handguns and freedom...their care and maintenance
    and other books

    5-0 out of 5 stars What a marvelous movie... I waited too....
    long to buy this movie -- my boys loved it the first time they watched it. It is timeless, a great comedy, wonderful lines.....
    A great addition to our movie selection!

    4-0 out of 5 stars A family comedy funnier than this? Inconceivable!
    For millions of television viewers who grew up during All in the Family's groundbreaking run (before it became stale in the post-1977 seasons), Rob Reiner will always be remembered as the Meathead, a.k.a. Archie Bunker's ultra-liberal, atheistic, and argumentative son-in-law, Mike Stivic. But Reiner, whose father Carl is one of America's best comedic writer-actor-directors (The Dick Van Dyke Show, Your Show of Shows, Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid), is far more than just a good actor with one famous role, for after he left Norman Lear's flagship comedy series after six seasons, Reiner the Younger followed in his father's footsteps to become a well-known and well-regarded actor, writer, producer, and director.

    One of Reiner's best films is 1987's The Princess Bride, a witty-yet-sweet comedy/fantasy written by two-time Academy Award-winning screenwriter William Goldman, who adapted his own novel about the beautiful maiden Buttercup (Robin Wright), whose true love, a young farmboy named Westley (Cary Elwes), goes off to sea to seek his fortune, telling Buttercup that he would come back for her.

    But when Buttercup learns that Westley's ship has been attacked by the Dread Pirate Roberts she swears she will never love anyone again, an oath she keeps even when she accepts a marriage proposal from Florin's Prince Humperdinck (Chris Sarandon), a handsome yet somewhat shady fellow who probably could give Machiavelli some lessons in, well, Machiavellian diplomacy. His plan is simple: take over as King of Florin as soon as his father passes away, get bethroded to a beautiful engaging commoner, then stage her kidnapping and demise to incriminate the neighboring rival kingdom Guilder and start a war.

    Aided by the equally heinous Count Rugen (Christopher Guest), Humperdinck hires a trio led by the too-clever-for-his-own-good schemer Vizzini (Wallace Shawn), the revenge-obsessed Inigo Montoya (Mandy Patinkin), and Fezzik (Andre the Giant), a brawny hulk with a heart of gold and a fondness for rhymes. The three manage to kidnap Princess Buttercup, but before they reach the Guilder-Florin border they run into an unforeseen obstacle: a dashing swordsman dressed in black.

    Goldman's clever way of grabbing the audience's heart and funny bone is to present this fairy tale with a framing story of a 1980s grandfather (Peter Falk) who visits his sick grandson (a pre-Wonder Years Fred Savage) and reads the tale of The Princess Bride to him, following a long family tradition.

    Reiner gets wonderful performances not only from the major cast members, but also from Billy Crystal and Carol Kane, who play Miracle Max and his wife Valerie in a short but hilarious scene. He approaches the fractured fairy tale as a comedy/romance/swashbuckling adventure, poking gentle fun at the conventions of all the fantasy/medieval adventure films of the 1930s and '40s without being obnoxious or too sardonic. The result: a film that overcame box-office failure (it had a brief and unprofitable theatrical run in the summer of 1987) by becoming a home video success. (This is not unique to The Princess Bride, either. 1939's The Wizard of Oz was no box office champ when it premiered; only when it became an annual TV staple in the mid-1950s did Oz become a family classic.)

    The 2001 MGM Special Edition DVD presents The Princess Bride in its original widescreen format, and features a director's commentary track by Reiner, a writer's commentary by Goldman, English and Spanish audio tracks, a new documentary on the making of the film ("As You Wish"), plus theatrical trailers and two original featurettes.

    As Vizzini might have added, to try and find a funnier family film is absolutely inconceivable.

    5-0 out of 5 stars An Awesome Movie (Review by Jennifer Baker)
    The Princess Bride is an excellent movie, and though at first viewing may seem pretty simple, it has much deeper meeting, but it may take more than one viewing to see this. First of all, it teaches the all-too-true, and sometimes overused lesson that good will prevail over evil. This is shown in Inigo's avenging of his father's death and Westley's rescuing of his true love, escaping his encounter with death, surviving "The Machine", making it through the fire swamp, battling the ROUS's, wrestling a giant, swordfighting with a Spaniard, and out-witting a Sicilian. (whew!) However, if you look closely, and watch this movie at least 100 times (which I have), then you will come to see that there is a lot of symbolism in The Princess Bride. Whether Buttercup is wearing blue (sadness) when she is getting married or red (danger) when she is kidnapped,the symbolism in this movie shows just how detailed this movie really is, which in turn makes it all the more fun to look for and watch. So in conclusion, The Princess Bride is a swashbuckling fun time for the whole family!!!!! ... Read more


    8. Beckett on Film DVD Set
    Director: Michael Lindsay-Hogg, Walter Asmus, John Crowley, Aton Egoyan, Richard Eyre, Charles Garrad, Damien Hirst, Enda Hughes, Niel Jordan, Robin Lefevre, David Mamet, Conor McPherson, Anthony Minghella, Katie Mitchell, Damien O'Donnell, Karel Reisz, Patricia Rozema
    list price: $149.95
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    Asin: B00006FXQN
    Catlog: DVD
    Sales Rank: 11409
    Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    The hugely ambitious Beckett on Film project gathered together 19different directors to turn the 19 stage works written by Samuel Beckettinto films. The range is vast--from the 45-second Breath to the twohours of his most famous play, Waiting for Godot--but all the worksreflect Beckett's penetrating obsessions with memory, regret, and thesimple, excruciating experience of being. Not every film succeeds--likeall great theater, Beckett's plays demand interaction with a live audienceto express their full intent--and though scholars tout Beckett's everyword as genius, several works are slight (Catastrophe, OhioImpromptu, or What Where will leave many viewers unimpressed).But all the plays feature Beckett's uniquely distilled language; thegreatest of them--including Waiting for Godot (in which two trampspass the time while they wait for someone who may never come),Endgame (in which a blind man and his lame servant bicker and jokeas the world declines), and Play (in which a love triangle isbitterly recalled by two women and a man in urns)--are astonishing in boththeir potent humor and piercing grief.

    Though Beckett's stature drew in animpressive array of directors (including Anthony Minghella, PatriciaRozema, and Neil Jordan) and actors (including Jeremy Irons, JulianneMoore, Alan Rickman, Kristin Scott-Thomas, Michael Gambon, and JohnGielgud), some of the finest work comes from relative unknowns. But thegem of the collection is Krapp's Last Tape, about an old manrevisiting his life through recordings he has made throughout his years.It's the perfect marriage of text, actor (the incomparable John Hurt), anddirector (Atom Egoyan, The Sweet Hereafter); in their hands, theplay spins from deeply funny to deeply sad, all with only the slightestdim of the light in Hurt's eyes. --Bret Fetzer ... Read more

    Reviews (5)

    2-0 out of 5 stars Worth a look.
    2 stars is misleading. I would recommend this to anyone interested in Becket. To see a directors interpretation of his work provided invaluable insights into both the works themselves, and the process of directing film.
    That being said, I was not amazed. The potential of a four disk DVD and large booklet, exclusively Becket, was unlimited. The product was a half-dozen enjoyable plays, and not even a documentary on Becket. In their great humility, they made a documentary, about themselves, making the DVD you are about to purchase. Great.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Who Put the Film in the Beckett on Film Project?
    Directors working on stage-to-screen adaptations find themselves torn between dual obligations to both the original work and the new medium. In the case of creating a collection of films meant to highlight the playwright's vision, questions raised by these obligations become even more controversial: should they remain true to the text, even if elements of the play don't work well on film? Dare they change those elements to better fit their new mode of expression? And in the case of Beckett, what percentage of the collections' earnings should go towards manic-depressive treatment centers? Of course, total objectivity in stage-to-screen adaptation remains a pipe dream. But we have to remember that even a theatric production has a director, who-while possibly faced with less decisions than a film director-invariably must makes choices leading to his own personal interpretation of the play. Ultimately, every production of a play, be it for DVD or Broadway, interprets rather than mirrors the original work. Therefore, the Beckett on Film Project should not be regarded as an unbiased representation, but rather an ambitious interpretation of one of the greatest playwrights of the twentieth century. And in this regard, with few exceptions, the Beckett on Film Project shines with commendable effectiveness.

    I wish to illustrate a few interpretive anomalies in the collection, to give you an idea of both the kinds of adaptive problems these directors had to face and some of their solutions. Consider "Act Without Words II," a short and dialogue-free play in which two characters mime their different daily routines against a narrow backdrop "violently lit in its entire length, [with] the rest of the stage in darkness." Director Edna Hughes chose to divide this backdrop into three film frames and to add a movie reel-like quality to the video. This constant reminder that we are watching a film is the same sort of self-referential metatextuality we find in many of Beckett's plays. Hughes' interpretive decision regarding the background also reinforces the repetitive theme of the play. That is to say, these characters' routines will go on and on, day after day, just as this very movie is being filmed-one frame after another. Hughes' use of a freeze-frame effect also highlights the technological superiority that film holds over its older cousin, theatre. The play calls for a "Frieze effect," but only on film can this be accomplished literally; in theatre it must be acted out. These changes by Hughes show intelligence in both his reading and adapting of the play to screen. Now, for something of a contrary example, consider one of Beckett's most famous short plays, "Play," in which three characters, trapped in urns, are forced to perpetually retell the story of the love triangle between them. The inquisitor: a lone spotlight that dictates which one of the three urns speaks, when, and for how long. But director Anthony Minghella's version gets rid of the light altogether, in favor of a loud and sometimes shaky camera, whose stronger presence is meant to take the light's place as these characters' inquisitor. Minghella's technique here ultimately falls somewhere between failure and success. The audible clicks and zooms of the camera do, for a time, give the viewer a feeling of submersion within the scene; since the camera now questions these characters, and we as viewers share the camera's gaze, the film achieves an interesting effect that draws us into the world of the story. But the camera cuts between the three urns so many times that the sense of a "unique inquisitor," as Beckett requests, soon dissipates. Not that the adaptation adds nothing to the play; once or twice, the camera pans around to give a broad scene of the background, a dark, foggy, and graveyard-like field littered with many more people in urns. While this background reduces the ambiguity of setting present in the original play, it does so perhaps necessarily, and in addition, clearly suggests that these characters' situations are in fact meant to be symbolic of some greater human condition. Ultimately, we recognize a tradeoff for every one of these questions of adaptation, but by and large, as these two examples illustrate, the gain outweighs the loss in the Beckett on Film Project. Or, put simply: the directors and actors earn their paychecks.

    Now keep in mind that despite the interpretive decisions I just described, the main thrust of this collection remains Beckett's. What does that mean? It means that these plays glimmer and shine with a bleak despair. The most dramatic moments are often the most comedic, and the only happy characters-well, forget about happy characters (after all, "Nothing is funnier than unhappiness," as Nell from Endgame tells us). But, dismal as they can be, Beckett's plays always manage to match their gloom in originality, creativity, and importance. They pose critical questions about what it means to exist as a human being. Do we simply spend our days idly, waiting-for Godot or anything else? Do we bury ourselves in the desert when we say "I do"? Can our condition be reduced to the emblem of a solitary finch, living in a draped cage with a dead mate and only a cuttle-bone to eat, in a darkened room stalked by a black cat whose own life depends on a suicidal man standing at a window? Whether or not you agree, you cannot help but ask, once Beckett has shown you the shadowy corners of his imagination. And keep in mind his influence on theatre and even art in general. Often touted as odd and sometimes inaccessible, but always brilliant, Beckett's plays deserve our attention, whether or not we choose to buy the Beckett on Film collection. What these productions add to Beckett's vision is an important sense of a modern moment. How have the technological advances made since Beckett's death affected what it means to be Beckettian? And how do the questions his work poses affect you? It's worth your time to find out.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Mixed bag
    Those who are familiar with the original productions will find this collection both exhilarating and frustrating. The more faithful the directors are to Beckett's vision, the more successful the adaptation to film. Come and Go is perhaps the purest of them, and also the most chilling. Other effective adaptations include Krapp's Last Tape, Rough for Theatre II, Act Without Words II, A Piece of Monologue, and Play (Minghella's truly -cinematic- adaptation probably deserves the highest marks). I'm ambivalent about many others, not least Ohio Impromptu and Catastrophe.

    Unfortunately the longer plays (Godot, Happy Days, and Endgame) suffer from the directors' mistaken impression that Beckett's characters must be decrepit, disgusting, and/or humorless. Quite the contrary, there is levity and compassion to be found in Beckett's work, and without it his meditations become intolerable rather than incisive. Godot has its moments, but it's not nearly as effective (or funny) as any number of previous productions.

    Pacing is also a significant issue here. Beckett's plays (excepting Not I and Play) demand a very slow reading, with an abundance of silence. Many of these adaptations simply plow through the texts with no apparent consideration of heft or nuance; Rockaby is probably the most egregious example. Other directorial liberties make Not I and What Where wholly unacceptable; these simply cannot be considered Beckett's work.

    Happily, more Beckett productions are becoming available on DVD. You can purchase Happy Days with Irene Worth's excellent performance on this very site, three plays (Eh Joe, Footfalls, Rockaby) starring Beckett's favorite actress Billie Whitelaw, and a DVD of Beckett Directs Beckett (the three long plays) hopefully in the near future.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent, with one exception.
    First let me say I've been waiting my whole adult life for this collection. I've spent 30 years trying to collect audio and video recordings of Beckett's work, and suddenly here are all the theatre peices in one beautiful package. The chance that you will ever find another film version of most of these works, or ever have a chance to see them on stage, is almost nil. If you love Waiting for Godot and Endgame, you will not regret the money spent on this. Unlike most plays and almost all movies, these are peices to be seen again and again, over a lifetime, letting the beauty and subtlety of Beckett's language slowly soak into your being.

    That being said, I was disappointed with only one peice: Endgame. With Michael Gambon as one of the leads, I expected the most from this play. But I'm afraid he was badly misdirected in this. He simply enjoys his dispair too much. He enjoys being a selfish, cruel master and his "Perhaps I could go on..." speech (one of Beckett's greatest)loses all its power. Gambon delivers this with hardly a pause, rambling on with the same puckish tone as the rest of his performance. (I thought maybe I was just too used to an earlier film version directed by Beckett, so I went back to the script to check this. After almost every phrase in the speech, Beckett has written (Pause). Without these pauses to let the anguish of the words sink into our minds, the speech carries no more weight than the rest of the text. Well, probably much more than you wanted to know.)

    Short Review: BUY THIS NOW! You'll be watching these films again and again as long as you own a DVD player.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Artist of the Century
    Curious that DVD Basen, the wonderful Danish web-compendium of dvd reviews from all over the world, has yet to register a word on BECKETT ON FILM, by any measure the dvd release of the year. These film renditions of Samuel Beckett's nineteen works for the stage (which is not the same as his "complete dramatic works," which would include radio plays and scripts for television), are, for the most part, thrillingly successful. The plays fall into two types. WAITING FOR GODOT, ENDGAME, KRAPP'S LAST TAPE, and HAPPY DAYS, however revolutionary in their time, still more or less conform to the conventional understanding of what a play is, ie: they contain recognizable characters and the shortest is an hour long. Despite the filmmakers' protests to make true movies of these plays, as opposed to "filmed plays," each of their single-locale settings make the theatrical origins of each work inescapable. Having said that, they are the best "filmed plays" this viewer has ever seen. Most of the remaining plays, particularly the late plays, are very short (under 15 minutes), and as Alan Rickman remarks, seem more like installations or "performance art," then full-fledged plays. What makes these works among the greatest plays ever written is precisely their inability to be transfered to another medium. With one exception, each of these little films, even the most brilliant of them (I'm thinking of the mind-blowing PLAY), must somehow compromise itself as a play in order to make the transition to film. The exception is OHIO IMPROMPTU. The intensity of this two character, ten minute piece perhaps reaches the full measure of its power as a film. Beckett's stage directions specify that its two actors be as alike as possible. On film, they can be exactly alike, by virtue of being played by the same actor, namely Jeremy Irons, who has famously played twins before. Despite the actor's disavowal, the characters of Reader and Listener can't help but conjure the image of DEAD RINGERS' Elliot commiserating with his twin brother Beverly aeons from hence in their own personal purgatory. Irons' performance is impeccable and affecting, although the Beckett purist might wish there were a little less of it. The performances throughout the plays are deliriously good, with the sad exception of the beautiful FOOTFALLS, which suffers from an overly mannered delivery on the part of its two actresess. One can only feel sorry for the director saddled with the relentlessly uncinematic THAT TIME. But BECKETT ON FILM is mostly a box of treasure, and a gift to the world. ... Read more


    9. Triumph of the Will (Special Edition)
    Director: Leni Riefenstahl
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    Average Customer Review: 4.46 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (89)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great Historical Film
    ...He is correct in saying the film is great for history buffs and that is what I am (BA-Hist). This film depicts history. It is an inside look at Nazi Germany. Turn off the lights when you watch it and you will think you have a front row seat at a Nuremburg rally. It may have been produced as propaganda but what it is now is nothing short of historical documentation, regardless of how the images were woven together.

    It has great footage and shows all of the regular Nazi Nuts and ones you have never seen or heard before. I loved being able to listen to them in German with subtitles instead of having a narrator. You can have that too. I bought the Special Edition DVD. The quality of this black and white film is the best I have ever seen. Special features include English subtitles and voice-over narration (all optional).

    Leni did not hire Industrial Light and Magic to insert millions of regimented Nazi followers. They are the real thing. The Nazi movement clearly stirred nationalistic fervor. You cannot deny the images. They speak for themselves. The German people were caught up in a movement of incredible proportions and this movie shows you what it was like in the early years of the Third Reich. Germans killed millions and millions of Germans died in WW II. This movie will give you a very good idea of what the Allied forces were fighting against.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A most valuable historical record
    It's easy to see how this now famous (or infamous) 1934 film by Leni Riefenstal could have helped reinforce Hitler's already dizzying domination of the German psyche. For our own time, it helps reveal the human complexity of the Nazi phenomenon - so much more than just a march of crazed fanatics, as it's often stereotyped today. Triumph of the Will is particularly relevant to current politics - the Austrian controversy, as well as the continued importance of various dictators who still garner so much of the media spotlight.

    Sadly, the near-sightedness of the Nazi mentality and its contradictory nature were already glaringly apparent at the time the movie was shot. Hitler's frenzied admonitions to value "peace" but at the same time to cultivate "courage", bristle with contradiction and hypocrisy. Brief allusions to racial purity and clear-cut moral rectitude are darkly ominous, as are the reiterated pledges of allegiance to Hitler , the man. It's instructive to compare Nazi rhetoric with much of today's political hype. Though, as many others have pointed out, nobody else has done it with quite the same elan. Sad to think that had they watched their own film with a more discerning eye, they might have seen what we see.

    From an artistic standpoint, I can appreciate why it's cited as one of the most accomplished of all propagandist vehicles. Nazi shortcomings notwithstanding, the film is stunning. Riefenstahl's contribution is self-evident - even if she didn't direct the action herself, she captured and organized it admirably. But for all that, it is still the action which is most spellbinding. The gripping facial expressions, the charismatic speeches, the thundering shouts of allegiance, the enormous scale and choreography - all of this actually took place! Combine that with historical perspective - knowing what all of it would lead to - and the movie acquires a distincively haunting quality.

    I not only recommend this film to others, I strongly advise it. It captures the very essence of social fanaticism. Many will instinctively feel its primitive appeal, and then, after putting it into perspective, recognize its inherent madness. Watching this movie, appreciating the feelings it evokes and reflecting on what it all means, will make the viewer a better person.

    5-0 out of 5 stars This Special Edition is good as it gets.
    The Synapse DVD Special Edition surpassed all expectations. I had Triumph of the Will on video prior to obtaining this DVD and the video's visual and audio quality was poor. By contrast, this DVD is visually very crisp and sharp and the audio quality is fine The DVD appears to be produced from an excellent original film print. I've seen another DVD of TOTW produced by different company, and its quality was the same as the video version :substandard. Make sure you get the Synapse version. This Special Edition is good as it gets.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A GREAT LOOK AT WHAT MODERN USA HAS BECOME
    THIS FILM GIVES A GREAT INSIDE LOOK AT HOW THE NOW MODERN USA OPERATES IN ITS POLITICS UNDER GEORGE W BUSH. WHO IS ALOMOST A CLONE OF HITLER. I RECCOMEND THIS FILM TO ANY BUSH SUPPORTER JUST FOR THEM TO SEE HOW ALIKE BUSH AND HITLER REALLY ARE.

    5-0 out of 5 stars An Influential Masterpiece of Cinematic Propaganda
    Riefenstahl's documentary made for Adolf Hitler and the NAZI party in the early 1930's. The documentary primarily covers the Nuremburg rallies and the activities that surrounded these events. Again, this is a propaganda film and was designed to stir popular sentiment and political empathy for the infamous political party.

    If one understands the socio-political climate of Germany in the late 1920s and early 1930s, one can clearly see what sentiments the film seeks to evoke and hence recognize its significance and brilliant execution. For example, Germany was in a state of shambles because of the global economic depression and many Germans feared an inevitable collapse to anarchy or Bolshevism. The opening scene starts with a Wagnerian piece and shows Hitler in a plane peering down from high above the clouds as he arrives for the rally. The scene sought to reassure a worried public that The Fuhrer was omnipotent, omniscient, and was coming down from the heavens to save a troubled nation in a godlike fashion. When he arrives at the stadium, Hitler is shown walking with his SA escort out of the crowd and towards the podium instead from behind the podium to look down at the crowd; this was to instill the notion that Hitler wasn't just another Berlin bureaucrat from the old failed Weimar Republic coming to talk down to a broken people; it was done to evoke the sense that he was a man of the people for the peole: selflessly arising out of a worried crowd of fellow Germans to lead them to a better and safer future. This particular scene was so influential in film that George Lucas adapted it (and many other scenes) for the closing scene to the original Star Wars when Luke, Han, and Chewy are decorated by Lea. Other scenes of happy German blonde and blue-eyed youths or common laborers performing paramilitary/social tasks were intended to evoke a proud sense of unity, purpose, and safety amongst all true German "volk" in these troubled times. In the background, the narrative voice recites how all German women should should bear many children for the Fatherland; how men should unite for the Fatherland and not Godless Bolshevism; how youths should work to better their nation; etc., etc.

    The mass communication techniques of Riefenstahl and Goebbels are still used today by virtually every modern government and media firm. This film is important not only as a histiorical tool in understanding the rise of Nazism and the dynamics of facism, it is a very important landmark in the development of film, mass entertainment and mass communication in general. I strongly believe that every person who seeks to better understand their world and media see this film at least once and study it. ... Read more


    10. Caddyshack
    Director: Harold Ramis
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    Catlog: DVD
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    Average Customer Review: 4.22 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (172)

    4-0 out of 5 stars The slobs -vs- The snobs
    This is a classic comedy that is still funny after so many years, I have read the reviews of this film left by others regarding the picture, I am not sure what they are talking about?!, I thought it had a great DVD transfer, the 19th Anniversary edition that is, they could be referring to the initial release of this film years earlier, however everyone plays their roles to perfection, Chevy Chase plays what is probably his best role as a playboy who golfs for fun, not scores, Rodney Dangerfield is perfect as a free-living, humorous & rude real-estate developer who loves getting a rise out of the late Ted Knight's uptight judge, & Bill Murray is lovable as the dim-witted groundskeeper who has a personal war with a gopher that is the film's real star, watching these characters unfold in neat as is Michael O'Keefe as a ambitious caddy who longs for somthing more, Cindy Morgan is Knight's niece with a questionable reputation, definately a movie that anyone could probably relate to, with the exception of some gross-out humor, the candy bar most noticebly, it is a straight comedy as Dangerfield squares off against Knight, watching these two is like watching politians go at it, but Murray's obsession with killing the gopher is never dull, watching the gopher react to his future plan of ridding him is funny as Murray uses plastic explosives in the form of other animals, this film had a sequel that had potential & had Murray & Dangerfield attached, but bowed out after Warner Bros. refused to compromise a script rewrite by them, only Chase returned for that one with little screen time, I highly recommend the original, but pass on the sequel, why Warner would allow Murray & Dangerfield to walk on the follow-up just shows how arrogant studio executives are, the follow-ups failure was their reward, the original is one of the best comedies ever!!!!!!!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Grab your bag
    Caddyshack is a movie that takes place at a upscale country club. The plot is based around a golfing match for high stakes between a team of Rodney Dangerfield and Chevy Chase versus Ted Knight. Caught in the middle is Michael O'Keefe. But forget the plot, it really doesn't matter. What matters are the brilliant comedic performances given by the above-mentioned and Bill Murray. Mr. Dangerfield plays a wild and crazy land developer who is rude, crude and obnoxious. Mr. Chase is Ty Webb, who is independently wealthy and plays golf without keeping score. Mr. Chase is at his wisecracking, smug best. Mr. Knight, plays a stuffy judge and he brings his Mary Tyler Moore persona to the character as he thinks he's smarter than he actually is. Mr. O'Keefe is given the least funny of the roles, but we feel for his character Danny Noonan. Mr. Murray gives a tour-de-force performance as Carl, the bumbling, stoned assistant greenskeeper. His scene where he describes as the Cinderella story at the Masters is a movie classic and one of the funniest scenes ever filmed. If you like comedies and want to laugh, then Caddyshack is for you. It is a movie that you can watch a million times and laugh just as hard as the first time you saw it.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Belly laugh city
    Just when I thought I couldn't watch the rest of the movie, a hysteric comedic scene or line brought me out of it. Rodney is unforgettable. When this one shakes out, some of the funniest stuff ever (so bad it's good).

    5-0 out of 5 stars A golf player's must!
    If you play golf,this film is for you. I'm sure Jack Nicklaus,Arnold Palmer and Tiger Woods have all seen this film. Harold Ramis directs an all-star cast featuring Chevy Chase,Bill Murray,Brian Doyle Murray(Bill's brother),Rodney Dangerfield and the late Ted Knight. This film's fetured song is I'M ALRIGHT recorded by Kenny Loggins. This hit film,theatircally released in July 1980,spawned the sequel,CADDYSHACK 2 in 1988.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Best Golf Movie...Ever
    While it's tough to put a golf movie ahead of Adam Sandler's great Happy Gilmore, no other golf movie has as many memorable lines in it as this one does. In fact, few other comedies have as many great lines as Caddyshack. Who can forget the conversation about playing with the Dali Llama or Bill Murray's monologue while "driving" the flowers?

    "It's in the hole!"

    One of the best scenes of the movie is where Chevy Chase drives the ball through Bill Murray's window, causing a great conversation between two comic greats of our time. Also, for anybody who has seen the new Tiger Woods' commercial where he's chasing the gopher and don't understand what in the world is going on- see this movie. ... Read more


    11. Battlestar Galactica (2003 Miniseries)
    Director: Michael Rymer
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    Asin: B00064AFBE
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    Sales Rank: 1138
    Average Customer Review: 3.35 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (157)

    1-0 out of 5 stars Idiotic, sexed-up, self-important crap!
    I really liked the old short-lived series. It was a nieve but uplifting adventure for the whole family. It had characters you would actualy want to be like. It was Star Wars for television. The worst thing about the old series is that the producers pulled the plug even though it had the higest ratings at the time.

    I was hoping the new version would capture some of that same old innocent magic. Well, it is nothing like the old one. The story and characters barely resemble it. It has great FX but nothing anyone hasn't seen on TV before (Farscape). I saw the first episode and just rolled my eyes most of the time. What's this crap trying to prove? Stupid sex scenes. Politicaly correct characters. Doom and gloom. Idiotic morons with bathroom humor that you are suposed to root for .. woo hooo! ..you go girl!! .. NOT!

    This crap is not a homage to an excellent classic but a BUTCHERING. If you loved the first one, stay away from this crap!

    3-0 out of 5 stars I don't hate it
    Some say that liking the older version of Battlestar Galactica better than the newer version is just a matter of "apples and oranges". I agree. I wouldn't be too pleased if I got orange pie when I was hungry for apple pie. That's why this new Battlestar rubbed some viewers the wrong way. The best way to approach this mini is to expect orange pie instead of apple.

    Do you remember Space: Above Beyond? Here we go again. They tossed some Battlestar and Battletech into the mix this time. There's also a 7 of 9/Terminator 3 sexy fembot. The age old "robots replacing humans" routine is back. There's also lots and lots of shaky camera work. We also get moments that are supposed to be very heavy and very dramatic which slow things down to a crawl. The upside is that we get sensational special effect battles which easily steal the show.

    Curious? Tape this when Sci Fi reruns it. That way you can zap forward as needed.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Galactica Then And Now
    I honestly don't see reason for juvenile critique on either version. I loved the original and did not find it hokey or campy anymore than I found the new one to be derivative and lopsided. Battlestar Galactica was and is a fun adventure. I liked Sheba from the original and I like Boomer from the new one...I'm never been a fan of the character Adama (in either version)...Richard Hatch was awesome in the 70's as Apollo and Dirk Benedict was terrific as Starbuck, but pilots have to be young and spry, and there's talk of another version of Galactica (starring many of your favorites from the 70's so be patient)...I think the Cylons should always be robotic (it's what makes them cool) and not cheaply (production costs) passed off as human (this was a tired staple in the Terminator movies and it's more exhausted in the new Galactica). I don't like the misleading packaging artwork on the new one...it makes me think of some psychological erotica or something. Now the atmosphere of the new version is fantastic and is a byproduct of cable-TV free from the major networks's far too sensitive censorship. Stop bickering over apples and oranges and enjoy both versions as individual entertainment. Now let's discuss sequels...

    2-0 out of 5 stars don't believe the hype
    Old school fans claim the retooled Battlestar is terrible.
    TRUTH: It's not that bad. Sure changes have been made but it's just not as awful as those who are hungry for the nostalgia of the old show say it is.

    Sci Fi has overhyped this new Battlestar. It's fans have bought the hype. It's supposed to the reinvention of the science fiction TV concept.
    TRUTH: The FX blow the old Star Trek out of the water and the rest of it is average. Much of it seems cobbled from a bunch of other science fiction shows.

    Bottom line: If you never saw this you wouldn't be missing anything.

    3-0 out of 5 stars a modern serious take on a old fun idea
    There are many people who hunger for seriousness in Sci Fi TV. I'm more of a party person than a church person. I don't like TV being too stuffy but I love me some fun escapist Sci Fi. That stuff gives me what I hunger for, but other's have a whole different jones. This Galactica didn't really hit me. It looks good, but it's made mainly for those who want more seriousness than far-out fun. Give it a try and see what you think. ... Read more


    12. After the Sunset (Widescreen Edition) (New Line Platinum Series)
    Director: Brett Ratner
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    Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
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    After the Sunset may not be the greatest jewel-heist caper comedy ever made, but it sure is easy on the eyes. Shifting back into his crowd-pleasing Rush Hour mode, director Brett Ratner kicks off the action with a rousing chase scene that pretty much describes the entire film: utter nonsense, but adequately enjoyable. Things get very sunny thereafter, when FBI agent Woody Harrelson lands in the Bahamas to track down ace diamond thief Pierce Brosnan and his lovely accomplice Salma Hayek, whom he suspects of planning their next big heist on a cruise ship. A Bahamian gangster (Don Cheadle) wants in on the action, and the whole thing's about as fluffy as an Elmo doll and just as harmless, especially when you consider Hayek's revealing wardrobe (which, thankfully, distracts from Brosnan's less-than-Bond-like physique). There's an abundance of witty banter between everyone, and the tropical locations make After the Sunset a balmy, vicarious vacation. Critics weren't exactly kind to this breezy dose of popcorn entertainment, but it's an agreeable time-killer and an instant cure for seasonal affective disorder, even if the comedic chemistry leaves something to be desired. --Jeff Shannon ... Read more

    Reviews (45)

    3-0 out of 5 stars Better Than I Expected
    This isn't really a caper film, which is one reason I enjoyed it more than I thought I would.Sure, it has some of the elements of the Hollywood caper movie--the debonaire, super-clever and super-successful thief, the cop out to thwart him, exotic locations--but the movie isn't really about will-he-pull-it-off-or-won't-he.It's more of a cat-and-mouse buddy movie.That the heists are utterly implausible, to the point of being ridiculous (as they are in most caper movies, like Oceans's Eleven and Ocean's 12) doesn't matter as much, because it's not what the movie focuses on.

    Instead, we get a lot of cute banter and bonding between Harrelson and Brosnan, who are fun to watch.There are some good, low-brow laughs in this movie--they are enough for me.I laughed out loud, for instance, when during the fishing scene Harrelson is putting tanning lotion on Brosnan's back, and Brosnan says, "My pole!" and Harrelson pulls back with disgust and says, "No way, I'm only doing your back!" (Of course, Brosnan meant, Look at the pole; I caught something.)There are other, similar crude jokes and sight gags.

    Both men are good in their roles, and fun to watch.The female roles in the movie seem incidental, a formulaic requirement of Hollywood movies, and are never really developed beyond that basic requirement.And what is Don Cheadle, a great actor, doing in such a miniscule role?Anyone could have done his rolel he's sadly wasted.Chris Penn has an amusing cameo...but my goodness, has he gotten fat.I remember seeing him in movies in the 80's, before he starting hitting the Big Macs.You don't often see an actor let himself go like that.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Commercial for Bahama Tourism Starring...
    After the Sunset is a fluffy piffle that is almost always beautiful to look at, but emptier than the nutritional content of cotton candy.

    Pierce Brosnan and Salma Hayek make a good-looking couple, and the movie actually TRIES to address a theoretical dilemma that is infrequently brought up in movies.If a rich and successful criminal retires, what do they do?If, presumably, part of why they were a criminal in the first place is for the thrill of it, how can they be content simply retiring?If being a thief is both your job AND your hobby, what do you do after the last "big one"?The only film I can think of that showed the boring lethargy that sets in on a successful criminal is the end of "Scarface" when Al Pacino is lying around in the marble tub of his palatial bathroom, smoking a cigar and cursing at his wife and buddy.

    But I digress.After the Sunset would be familiar territory if the only movies you had seen were the "Ocean's 11" remake(s).It's a "steal the jewel" caper.It tries to be a comedy, but Brosnan and Woody Harrelson don't have the comic chemistry we've seen both of them have in other work. Harrelson appears as the FBI agent who has been repeatedly burned by Brosnan, and wants to get his revenge.It follows the film cliche where the lawman is "hot on the trail" of the criminal - a la "Heat", etc., but instead of an edgy relationship between the Thief and the Lawman we get a bumbling comic relationship between Brosnan and Harrelson.

    The "star" of the film is the way it looks, and much of that is owed to the Bahamanian resort standing in for paradise.The movie made me want to go there - but it didn't make me want to ever see this film again.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Our family has been in manure for three generations!
    Did I miss something?Was there a contest going through all the Grade Schools of America to find the best story for acclaimed director Bret Ratner to bring to the silver screen?If so, why wasn't there a calendar made for those who didn't make the final cut?Oh, wait, apparently children did not write this film, but instead a guy that wrote for the TELEVISION SERIES the Weakest Link.That surely makes him ready by all means to tackle the caper genre and inherit a big payday ... right?You are the weakest link ... good-bye.This movie was a disaster from the beginning.With cardboard acting, an aging (and girth growing) sex symbol, and a corny ending that incorporated nothing that we were shown through the entire film, it is a big wonder how After the Sunset ever saw the illustrious "green-light".Perhaps it was the size of Salma's boo ... name, or perhaps the fact that Pierce Brosnan's The Thomas Crown Affair was such a cult film, or maybe because Don Cheadle was in it, because it had really no pull with just Woody headlining.So, how did this film get made?This film targeted pre-teen boys and retirement communities, and with their great pull, the financing behind this film became very easy.

    This was a caper film right?We are supposed to go on this roller coaster ride of who's conning whom, coupled with lies, deceit, and a surprise ending that will make you want to rewatch from the beginning to experience anything that you missed.That is the focus, goal, and overall tone that a film like this should have followed.Instead, Ratner decided to just make a movie without any sort of excitement or drive.As I watched this film, I never once felt excited about the plot.Why?Because there was nobody getting me excited.The acting in this film was well below par for anything that Hollywood has released.Pierce tries, but just can't seem to capture the essence of the film.There is no little demon inside you rooting for anything.Salma's role was basically for eye-candy.She provided nothing spectacular either.I can literally say the same for Woody and Cheadle as well.Here we have strong actors doing absolutely nothing during the course of about two hours.These characters never drive the plot, they bring nothing but clichés to the table, and by the end we really don't have any true grasp as to whom they are.Honestly, cardboard cutouts could have replaced the actual actors and After the Sunset would have been a better film.There was no depth to the characters, no emotion, no structure, just the simple direction of "step here, say your line, step here, look surprised".It was embarrassing for all that were involved.

    I think a major flaw to this film was that Ratner did not fully understand, or was prepared, for the caper genre.From the opening moments until the end of the film, you can tell that Ratner is just trying to use his friends in the industry and show the world that he has some power as well.I say this because I saw no true direction or moment of impressiveness where he defines himself as a director.He reuses the same ideas throughout the entire film, he doesn't give anything strong to his players, and nothing stood out in this movie.Sure, it was a beautiful location, but am I to believe that Salma spend a majority of the film building a deck for them to sit on?Am I to believe that Pierce is still a sex symbol even with a HUGE gut sticking out?Am I to believe that Cheadle is a bad guy/imported American who is at the top of the community?Finally, am I to believe that Pierce could still move as quickly as Ratner defined?I swear that in the final unclimactic moments of this film, I could hear Pierce doing some heavy breathing to get from point A to point B.Maybe he isn't ready for the next Bond role.

    So, without a good story, or decent characters, maybe there was some humor in it that could pull us away from the sour sensation cultivating in your mouth.Well, guess who is placed in to do the humor element? Woody Harrelson.Now, I don't mind Woody, but in this role, he just wasn't believable and his humor was so cliché that I had trouble believing that he brought anything to this character.He literally plagiarized his entire role.Teachers, and film viewers of the world, should be very upset with him.Instead of bringing a new twist to his character, he resorted to weird sex humor, skimpy bully humor, and that ever-popular drunken humor while fishing that is sure to make that senile woman in the front burst out with laughter. To me it was pathetic and a worthless attempt to make a joke out of already dead film.

    Overall, this was a massive disappointment.Here you had a decent director, some strong players, but the worst story ever written by a man who wrote for a game show.Which piece does not fit?There was this huge sense of apathy throughout this entire film and clichés riddled it that I just couldn't get past.Brosnan had trouble with this film, and I couldn't tell if it was because he just didn't care, or because he was working with such low-talent that his heart just wasn't in it.The ending hurt as well.There was no excitement or intensity, just plain ... "here it is ... like it or not".I personally couldn't digest this film with its poor acting and below-par story.This may be a good film for some that are not familiar with the caper genre, but for me it was just hogwash.

    Grade: * out of *****

    4-0 out of 5 stars I Liked It
    I liked this movie alot. I watched it twice. I really enjoyed the little twist it had at the end.

    2-0 out of 5 stars AFTER THE BOREDOM! (21/2 ) STARS
    Where the hell was the action in this movie! It started off
    decent, then went down hill from there. The only thing that
    kept me watching this lame script, was Salma Hayek! I gave the
    movie 1 1/2 stars, and Salmas body 1 extra diserved star! ... Read more


    13. The Fox and the Hound (Disney Gold Classic Collection)
    Director: Richard Rich, Art Stevens, Ted Berman
    list price: $29.99
    our price: $22.49
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00004R993
    Catlog: DVD
    Sales Rank: 1996
    Average Customer Review: 4.26 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (85)

    5-0 out of 5 stars There couldn't be a better Disney movie to own on DVD.
    For me, the Fox and the Hound cannot be matched by any other Disney film. Unlike the stiffer, older films and the newer, hokier ones, the atmosphere in TFATH is just perfect, truly a revolutionary point in Disney's timeline. The animation is very fluid and the characters have great design and movement. Most of the songs are more like talking than singing, but they're few and far between and manage to get the point across. A nice change from usual Disney fare in the surprisingly sad ending. Considering I'm pretty desensitized to on-screen emotion, it's unusual that I cry every time I watch this one. It's the ONLY Disney movie that can make me. Even so, there's a number of comedic moments to get rid of the tension. I'm not sure where the Amazon review got the idea that the characters lack depth. Believe me, by the time this one is over, you'll be wanting to see much more of all of them. It's an excellent feature that carries an important message all wrapped up inside a lovable, heartwarming, and poignant story. You owe it to yourself and your children to see this one.

    5-0 out of 5 stars An All-Time Favourite!
    "The Fox and the Hound" was of the last films to be apart of the "Black Diamond Collection" before the "Masterpiecee Collection" came to the markets in 1994. The film was released into theaters in 1981 & 1988 and came to video in 1994! This movie is a really great and colorful movie to add too any Disney collector's collection!

    The story is about a kind woman who takes in an abandoned baby fox after his mother is killed in a hunting trip. She names him Tod and considers him as part of her family. Tod then meets a bloodhound dog named Copper (Who lives right next door to the kind woman) and they eventually become good friends. They have no clue that they are supposed to be enemies (Since hounds hunt foxs and other forest creatures)

    After returning on a hunting trip during the winter with his master (To learn how to hunt), Copper realizes how he shouldn't hang around Tod to prevent Tod from getting killed by his master. By this time, they are both grown up and all the fun times that they had together suddenly don't seem to matter anymore. Eventually, Tod and Copper become enemies and it is Copper's mission to hunt down Tod. You'll be surprised on what happens when Copper and Tod to come face to face!

    The film also includes some great songs like "The Best Of Friends" and "Goodbye May Seem Forever" (Which I still cry at when I hear that song!) This movie will also make you cry, so make sure to have a tissue in your hand when approaching the middle part of the movie! All in all, it is a really great movie and people young and old will enjoy watching it! 83 minutes.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Good Movie for people of all ages
    I am sixteen years old and when I saw this movie, it really brought tears to my eyes. It reminds me of how me and my best friend was. I really enjoyed this movie. Everyone should watch it on Family Nights.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Friends to the end.
    This is one of my favorite Disney movies. When Widow Tweed takes in a baby fox, whose mother had been shot by hunters, she names it Tod and raises it. About the same time she takes Tod in, her neighbor, Amos Slade brings home a hound dog puppy named Copper.

    One day in the woods, Copper and Tod meet and instantly become the best of friends. When fall comes and Amos takes an unwilling Copper along for his winterlong hunting trip, Tod tries to convince his friends, Big Mama, Dinky and Boomer that even though Copper will come back a trained hunting dog, that they will still stay the best of friends. Big Mama tells Tod that a fox and a hound are natural enemies and that, surprise, you ARE a fox.

    When the two are finally reunited in the spring, Copper tells Tod that they can't be friends anymore. After a tragic accident involving Amos's other dog Chief, Copper swears that Tod will pay. Widow Tweed, realizing that she can't keep Tod locked up forever, takes Tod to the game preserve and lets him go. Amos resolves to kill the fox, and with Copper's help, goes to track him down. But when Copper has a run in with a bear, Tod comes to his rescue and, ultimately, Copper gets Tod spared from death.

    A touching story about friendship that never fails to bring a tear to my eye.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Finally a DVD Version of this Awsome movie
    I love this movie a lot it has great music like "Best Of Friends"
    "Goodbye may seem Forever" and "Thats what Friends Are For" are all great songs on this DVD. ... Read more


    14. La Belle Noiseuse
    Director: Jacques Rivette
    list price: $39.95
    our price: $35.96
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B0001Y4LEQ
    Catlog: DVD
    Sales Rank: 6462
    Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    La Belle Noiseuse is a thrilling and unconventional drama about the responsibility of an artist to his vision and the conflicts that arise when such responsibility is perceived as a threat to others. Michel Piccoli (Le Doulos) delivers one of his finest, most lived-in performances as Edouard Frenhofer, a famous painter living with his artist wife Liz (Jane Birkin) on a spacious estate in the French countryside. Frenhofer has lacked inspiration for a decade and has given up on painting. The idea behind his unfinished masterpiece, La Belle Noiseuse ("The Beautiful Troublemaker"), has been seemingly unattainable for a decade; Liz was the original model for it, and Frenhofer's exhaustion with the project has an emotional parallel to his dispassionate relationship with her.

    Along comes a rising artist, Nicolas (David Bursztein), who suggests that his girlfriend, Marianne (Emmanuelle Béart), a writer, could help Frenhofer jumpstart the painting's completion. From this point, most of La Belle Noiseuse becomes a remarkable, seemingly unedited and privileged look at the development of a bond between artist and muse. Béart, fiercely brilliant, spends the majority of the film nude and continually molded into sometimes-painful positions as Frenhofer struggles--sketch after sketch, paint upon paint--to find something beyond the obviousness of Marianne's body. As the two struggle to meet each other halfway, Liz and Nicolas feel marginalized and jealous, putting pressure on Frenhofer to disregard such personal concerns or give in to them. Adapted by French New Wave master Jacques Rivette from a story by Honore de Balzac, the lengthy La Belle Noiseuse is fascinated by the artistic process; it is itself a patient process of watching ideas and aesthetic courage reveal themselves in the face of extraneous aversion. --Tom Keogh ... Read more

    Reviews (4)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Superb
    I am not sure what the person before me knows about French cinema and the history of this film in particular but before posting comments that border sheer ignorance PLEASE do some research. This true masterpiece of a film was shot in 1.33 and that is how La Belle Noiseuse it was shown during the Cannes film festival. This is the prefered original aspect ratio (perhaps some have forgotten that not all films are supposed to be seen in widescreen, many were shot in an academy ratio of 1.33). Though La Belle Noiseuse is a modern film, just like Godard often does, Rivette has chosen a ratio that fits best his vision.

    With this said the length of the film has nothing to do with the artistic merits it conveys. This is a strong, utterly sophisticated, yet bold and original film that reaches the very core of the creative process artists go through. Exceptional work!!

    3-0 out of 5 stars A word before it's released
    This is a 4-hour French film, and I have seen the VHS version. Although the film is generally criticized for being way too long and boring, I personally found the film very appealing. I enjoyed the slow pacing. The film definitely involves the viewer, and 4 hours later, you feel like you really know these characters, who now have a life of their own. There is a substantial amount of nudity in the film, but it's more about posing for an artist than about sex. This is, in fact, an art film, not a mainstream film. As such, it delves into human emotion as much as it paints the beauty of the female form. I'm giving this film, in advance of its DVD release, 3 stars because it is being released in standard format, which is an insult to any film, and because it may not appeal to the average mainstream viewer, who may be too impatient to watch all 4 hours of it. But for me, it will be a welcome addition to my limited collection of French films.

    I absolutely agree with everything said by the 5-star reviewer (except for the statement about this being released in its orginal format, which is apparently erroneous). But having read contemporary French language critiques of this film, and having dicussed it with a few of my French friends (who mostly complained about its length), I still believe that the average mainstream non-French viewer will probably find the film a bit too long and boring. Fans of art film in general, and French films in particular, will definitely treasure it, though. Include me in.

    5-0 out of 5 stars See it any way you can...
    La Belle Noiseuse is now available on DVD through Amazon.co.uk. Unfortunately it is transferred in 1.33:1 aspect ratio, which is falsely stated to be the original ratio, whereas in fact the film was shot and screened in 1.66:1 - while for some films this might be tolerable, here the cropped picture detracts woefully from the cinematic experience - profiles are severed, actors inexplicably move half off screen, the beauty of many tableaus is compromised. One can only hope that Criterion decide to provide an American edition. That said, the actually picture quality is good and the subtitles legible.
    *
    There is an interesting interview, however, with Rivette, in which he tells of Divertimento being edited together entirely from out-takes. To illustrate the point a dinner table scene is shown, first from La Belle Noiseuse, and then from Divertimento -in the first there are many cuts and changes of point of view, in the second a slow zoom in onto one couple and only a single cut. In a way, then, Divertimento is an entirely different film. Rivette explained the changes as in part stemming from a certain boredom attending the traditional editing process - he and his editor did their best to entertain themselves, and to create a significant variation on the original work of art.
    *
    As an exploration of the artistic process, and of the psychological danger involved in exploring the depths of another human, the film is wonderful. Of course, in terms of aesthetic beauty it is also hard to fault. Michel Piccoli is sensitive and somehow manages to vie for command of the screen against the charms of Emmanuelle Beart (who really is stunning).
    *
    This, I think, is by far Rivette's best work, and definitely worth viewing in whatever available format.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Only for hardcore "La Belle Noiseuse" fans (like me)
    After receiving extraordinary acclaim for his 4-hour masterwork "La Belle Noiseuse", seminal French New Wave director Jacques Rivette edited it down to 2 hours (by jettisoning its long real-time takes of an artist at work), substituting alternate takes of certain scenes and making subtle but important changes in the scene order. The result is "Divertimento", a slightly darker and, in my opinion, substantially lesser work.

    If you admire "La Belle Noiseuse" as much as I do, "Divertimento" will give you a thought-provoking but not revelatory new angle on a great film. If you haven't seen "La Belle Noiseuse" yet, don't cheat yourself by watching this one first. ... Read more


    15. Can't Buy Me Love
    Director: Steve Rash
    list price: $14.98
    our price: $11.98
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B000065V3H
    Catlog: DVD
    Sales Rank: 2419
    Average Customer Review: 4.22 out of 5 stars
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    Description

    Nowhere-man Ronny Miller is secretly in love with Cindy Mancini, the prettiest, most popular girl on campus. When Cindy finds herself in a desperate predicament, Ronny steps in to save the day ... for a price! Cindy must pose as Ronny's girl so that her popularity might rub off on him. But the road to popularity takes an unexpected twist when Ronny becomes so "cool" that his former friends feel the chill, Cindy is left toally out in the cold, and Ronny himself discovers that money might buy you popularity, but it can't buy you love! ... Read more

    Reviews (69)

    5-0 out of 5 stars You Can't Buy Love, But You Can Buy This Movie
    Amusing story of a nerdy high school student Ronald Miller (Patrick Dempsey) who discovers that becoming popular isn't the greatest thing in the world. After she accidentally ruins her mother's suede dress with some wine, Cyndi, the most popular girl at school (played wonderfully by Amanda Petersen) will do anything to replace it before her mother gets back from her trip.

    Enter Ronald. After seeing her desperate attempt to replace the dress at the mall, Ronald makes a deal with Amanda. He'll use the money that he has earned all summer by mowing lawns to buy a new dress, in return for Amanda's help in turning him to Mr. popularity.

    Along the way, Ronnie learns lessons about the true value of having real friends, and towards the end of the movie Ronald discovers that he is still himself.

    This film, which is no longer produced by Touchstone Video (a division of the Disney Corporation) features many couple of stars before they hit it big. Gerardo, the Latin-singing star who scored a one-hit wonder with "Rico Suave," plays one of the football jocks in the film. However, the real scene-stealer in this film is Seth Green ("Austin Powers"; "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" "Can't Hardly Wait") who plays Ronald's annoying, yet hysterical little brother, Chuckie. By taking a look at Seth in this past role you can understand why he is such a big star today. He is always a trip when it comes to comedic performances.

    I loved this film for many reasons, but I think the most memorable scene in this film probably has to be Ronald learning an African dance he saw on television (he thought he was watching "American Bandstand"). After learning it, Ronald performs it at the big dance, not knowing that it would become a huge hit.

    This film ranks among the 10 best teenage comedies produced in the 1980's. Let's only hope that it will be re-released on video and DVD in the near future.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Great 80's teen comedy
    Viewed as a genre of its own, the 80's Teen Comedy produced some fun, enjoyable movies. One that holds up quite well is Can't Buy Me Love. Starring Patrick Dempsey in what was probably his best role of the era, it's the story of a geeky kid who pays the captain of the cheerleading team to pretend to be his girlfriend for a month. While not entirely realistic, it has a good ending. The humor holds up well after 16 years, as does the movie overall.

    The DVD was hugely disappointing, and my 4 stars are based on the movie itself. Unless you consider chapter stops a special feature, the disc is devoid of any extras. The greatest offense is that it's presented only in fullscreen. I'd normally pass on a non-widescreen release, but my wife insisted on having it. If you have to have this movie, this is probably the best release it will see for quite some time.

    5-0 out of 5 stars ONE OF MY ALL-TIME FAVS***
    If you love the corny but terrific 1980's, you'll love this movie. In my opinion, the TEEN MOVIE OF ALL TEEN MOVIES... tHE CLOTHES ARE A RIOT, but ther than that this movie has a terrific point, Cools, Nerds...who cares! Ronald Miller rides into the most popular girl in school's heart on a lawnmower. From there its all sorts of fun for the move watcher! I love this move and was soooo pleased it was released on DVD. No special features, bummer. Terrific film though. Be sure to get it!

    5-0 out of 5 stars 1980s classic!!!
    Patrick Dempsey plays nerdy Ronnie Miller, who is so on the outside of society at his high school that he is known simply as "Lawn Boy" because he mows everyone's lawn for his part-time job. He wants to be popular for his upcoming senior year, and he sees his chance when cheerleader Cindy Mancini is in a jam, having ruined her mother's suede outfit at a party and needing $1000 to replace it.

    Ronnie happens to be at the mall at the same time, purchasing a new telescope with his lawn-mowing money when he sees Cindy's dilemma. He offers to pay for the new outfit if she will pretend to be his girlfriend for a month and introduce him to the popular circle.

    Although this seems completely crazy to Cindy, she does it (after a great little makeover -- quite the staple of 1980s teen movies!) She even starts to like Ronnie as a person, until popularity goes to his head.

    People are lemmings and will believe whatever they are told, particularly in the classic scene where Ronnie starts doing the "African Anteater Dance" which he saw on a show he mistook for 'American Bandstand'. Everyone at the school dance follows him instantly.

    Don't miss a very young Seth Green as Ronnie's annoying brother! He is great as a smarmy kid!

    5-0 out of 5 stars NERDS, COOLS, MY SIDE, YOUR SIDE, ITS BS !!
    THIS MOVIE IS ONE OF THE GREATEST TEEN MOVIE'S EVER MADE. I just saw a preview the other day for a movie thats about to be released.. i think its called "Love Dont Cost A Thing" - and its a total rip off !!!! of Can't Buy me Love, just shows how their is no originality these days, they sample the hell out of music, now movies !! ... Read more


    16. American Dreamer
    Director: Rick Rosenthal
    list price: $14.99
    our price: $11.24
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B0007TKHDO
    Catlog: DVD
    Sales Rank: 779
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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    Amazon.com

    JoBeth Williams plays an unfulfilled housewife who wins a trip to Paris after entering a short-story contest. Once there, she is hit by a car and wakes up believing she is the ingenious and brave heroine from her story. A series of misadventures leads her on a merry chase with fellow bumbler Tom Conti. The casting is a little dubious, but the ever adorable Conti gives this charm. It may rip off Romancing the Stone--without emulating that flick's witty dialogue or sexuality--but this appealing fluff remains a pleasant, if slight, diversion. --Rochelle O'Gorman ... Read more

    Reviews (70)

    5-0 out of 5 stars american dreamer
    a fresh and funny film i truly enjoyed it and wish more tom conti films were brought to dvd

    4-0 out of 5 stars True romance
    I love this movie. I try to catch it whenever it's on tv but I'm excited that it's coming out in DVD. However, I don't believe Robert Urich is in it. Tom Conti is the male star. The movie really shows the power of mind over matter; a delightful romantic comedy.

    5-0 out of 5 stars American Dreamer Released on DVD - May 3rd!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Amazon is listing American Dreamer-DVD on it's website...a picture of the DVD is also displayed!

    It will finally be released on May 3, 2005!!!!!

    5-0 out of 5 stars May 3, 2005?
    Other websites have announced the release of the DVD on May 3, 2005.Amazon, as of today, has it listed but without any details except for the date 1990, which is NOT the American Dreamer with Conti.So keep watching.Should be interesting to see how many buy the DVD prerelease.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Another vote for a DVD release
    I just can't get enough of this movie!I watch it any time I want to feel really good. ... Read more


    17. The Bad News Bears
    Director: Michael Ritchie
    list price: $14.99
    our price: $11.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00005JK9L
    Catlog: DVD
    Sales Rank: 3479
    Average Customer Review: 4.12 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (34)

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Matthau Gem... Shall We Say "Diamond?"
    The great Walter Matthau (all saggy jowls) plays Buttermaker, an ex-pitcher turned pool cleaner who tools around all day on his jobs in a chop-top station wagon with a cooler of beer in the backseat. A local businessman talks (with money) Buttermaker into coaching a youth-league team of castaways. Seems this is one community that takes its youth league baseball seriously. A little too seriously.

    What follows is the familiar plot of a bunch of underdog kids coming together as the "Team Nobody Believed In" and contending for the championship against a team that represents everything that's wrong when parents spoil simple pleasures for their children (the Yankees, coached by Vic Morrow, in a neatly-observed performance). Look, I don't know if "Bears" even did it first, but this movie certainly does it best, and without the labored sentimentality of its progeny.

    "Bears" never turns cartoonish. It captures just the right atmosphere- slanting, late afternoon sunlight during the games, the bikes parked behind the dugouts, the post-game chants. The kids, led by Tatum O'Neal and Jackie Earle Haley all perform well, and each has a sharply defined personality. Even Morrow, as Buttermaker's antagonist, isn't portrayed as bad or evil- just a guy with misplaced priorities that make him act like a jerk.

    But Matthau makes this movie, conning kids into making martinis for him and cleaning pools while he regales them with increasingly drunken stories of his baseball glory days... until he passes out on the mound in a litter of beer cans. Matthau plays Buttermaker as a modern day loser who discovers (eventually) he still has a better nature.

    Bright, smart and funny, "The Bad News Bears" is a joy to watch, full of quick-witted exchanges and even heartbreak. If you've seen one too many "Mighty Ducks" flicks, do yourself a favor and watch this one. It goes down as smooth as one of Buttermaker's ice cold ones on a hot afternoon.

    And look for that kid who played Eddie in "The Courtship of Eddie's Father" as Morrow's son and the Yankees' star pitcher. He has a ballpark epiphany that's true and heartbreaking. Just another aspect of this marvelous little movie.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Good News for the Bad News Bears
    A great movie that hits it mark..unfortunately sprung two terrible sequels. THE BAD NEWS BEARS is a social commentary about when kids are taken out of the sandlot (which is more fun when kids are left to play among themselves) and organized by adults to play little league baseball and the result is chaos. Walter Matthau in one of his signature roles as coach Buttermaker (he even reprised the role in a parody of the film on SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE, in the now classic and hilarious BAD NEWS BEES sketch). Matthau is hilarious as the drunken, ex-big league ballplayer/pool cleaner hired by one of the parents to coach a bunch of losers in a competetive and elite Los Angeles little league organization. The kids are innocent, but honestly brutal in their depiction. Standout performances from Jackie Earl Haley (BREAKING AWAY)as Kelly Leak, the motorcycle riding punk who is also a great athlete, Chris Barnes as tough little Tanner Boyle (who supposedly takes on the whole seventh grade when he is humilated in the embarrassing first game loss), and of course Tatum O'Neal as the tough girl pitcher whose curve ball breaks 2 feet. All this works on a level of a family movie, but some situations are adult oriented. Watch the film on network television and it is butchered beyond recognition. On DVD and cable, it it way better because you see why some of the situations occur. One example is the scene when pitcher Joey Turner (Brandon Cruz -tv's COURTSHIP OF EDDIE'S FATHER) throws at the head of batter Engelberg (Gary Lee Cavagnaro) and you'll know why. Actor Vic Morrow continues his string of bad guy roles even in this film as Coach Roy Turner and even the Yankees (a metaphor for elitistism) is used as a name of one of the teams as the arch rival of the Bears. Overall, entertaining and authentic with great casting.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Dear Luper
    Dear Luper Ronsogni makes me sick, he cant even pitch nobody thinks we can win, ps I saw a good movie the other night, youd like it. Your friend, tanner boyle

    5-0 out of 5 stars I Loved This Movie!
    I remember my mother taking me to see The Bad News Bears when it was playing in movie theaters, I was about 10 1/2 years old and I loved the movie and thought it was a lot of fun to watch and I thought that the cast was great, Tatum O'Neal, Walter Matthau, Vic Morrow, Jackie Earle Haley, etc and when HBO started showing The Bad News Bears I watched it to many times to count. I see some reviewers have complained about bad language but honestly I have heard much worse langague in movies that are being made these days and I still have to highly recommend The Bad News Bears.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Classic, realistic, non-syrupy story of Little League
    Don't listen to other reviewers who impose today's political correctness on a movie that came out in 1976. My parents took me to see this film when it came out (I was nine) and it was a good film. It has lessons about winning, losing and sportsmanship. It touches upon characters we all know: the winning coach (played wonderfully by the late Vic Morrow) who values winning above all else - even his own son. A realistic film from the 1970s, reflecting divorced parents, precocious kids, bullies, all of it is in here. Above all, it is a positive statement about self-respect and accomplishment. While Matthau's ways of coaching would probably be protested today (i.e., giving the kids beer after the final game of the season) it was seen as true to his character and one of the funny touches. Some of the material is mature but it may spark some positive conversations in a family. It isn't watered down, squeaky-clean family fare that people expect today, but it does have a good message and is fun. Excellent performances by a great cast, realistic baseball playing (sometimes painful) and great moments. A classic 1970s film that is often overlooked. ... Read more


    18. The Inn of the Sixth Happiness
    Director: Mark Robson
    list price: $14.98
    our price: $11.98
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00008LDO1
    Catlog: DVD
    Sales Rank: 3273
    Average Customer Review: 4.62 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (29)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Bergman shines in religious epic
    Overlong but fairly engrossing bio of Gladys Aylward, an English-woman who, despite her lack of qualifications, becomes a missionary in China. The film is episodic and covers Aylward's brief career as a parlor maid (saving money for her trip to China), her journey to China, her work at the Inn of the Sixth Happiness and the Chinese-Japanese war which results in her guiding 100+ children in an arduous journey through the mountains to a safer village. I didn't find the film as moving as other reviewers but it is well mounted and nice to look at. Bergman is outstanding as are other supporting players, most notably Curt Jergens and Robert Donat. This was Donat's last film (he died before it was released) and his last screen words are prophetic - "We shall not see each other again, I think. Farewell."

    What is most notable about this dvd release is the excellent commentary by Nick Redman, Aubrey Solomon and Donald Spoto. Redman talks about the real Gladys Aylward, Solomon talks about the film production and Spoto discusses Ingrid Bergman. There were many things changed for the film version and many of them are small and inexplicable. For example, Aylward's given Chinese name was Ai-weh-deh (not Jenai), an adopted child was actually named Ninepence (Sixpense in the movie), etc. Other changes were more larger in scope - Aylward's journey to China was quite harsh and she almost died several times. The inn-keeper, Jeanne Lawson (memorably played by Athene Seyler) was no as agreeable a woman as portrayed in the film - she was actually a cantankerous person prone to fits and thought to be quite mad by the villagers. Aylward herself was thought by many to be fanatical and to put it bluntly, off her rocker. Many other fascinating aspects about the film and the women (both Aylward and Bergman) are included.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A must for every video library ! An inspiring tear-jerker !!
    One rainy afternoon I was channel surfing and came across this movie and fortunately for me it was very close to the beginning. I was so drawn into the story and captivated by Ingrid Bergman's performance that I forgot I was even watching television!! This is one of the most touching and moving stories I have ever seen and (I won't give this part of the movie away) when the Chinese gave "Gladys" a new name and what that translated to in English I thought I was going to go through a whole box of tissues right then and there. The storyline, scenery and acting are superb and the fact that it is based on a true story only makes it more inspiring. My cousin is 18 years old and wants to pursue a career in the mission field and I told her many times that she has to see this film. So I'm not only going to purchase one for MY video library but one for HER'S as well.

    5-0 out of 5 stars following God's call
    This is a magnificent film in every aspect; the acting is brilliant, the landscapes beautiful, the drama intense. Based on the true story of Gladys Aylward, a house maid in England who was "not qualified" to be sent to China as a missionary, so went there on her own, saving every shilling earned for a ticket on the Trans-Siberian railroad. Taking place in the pre-WWII era, it's an adventure story of great spiritual courage, the chaos of war, and a romance between two independent people who never thought they would find love.

    Ingrid Bergman is luminous as Gladys. It is one of her very best performances, and my personal favorite. Robert Donat, who passed away before the film was released, is also marvelous as the Mandarin of Yang Cheng, and Curt Jurgens as Captain Lin Nan is handsome and believable as the man who falls in love with Gladys. In a small but pivotal part, Athene Seyler is terrific as Jennie Lawson, the elderly missionary who helps Gladys in her early years, and Peter Chong is a delight as Yang the cook.
    It is odd that the only Oscar nomination went to director Mark Robson; perhaps Bergman was overlooked because she had received a "Best Actress" for "Anastasia" two years earlier, but Bergman fans will give this film their own five-star award.

    The fabulous location filming by Freddie Young was done in Snowdonia National Park, North Wales, a remarkable substitute for Shaanxi Province, in the heart of China. The village reproductions are very well done, and look incredibly similar to films I have seen shot in China. The lovely score by Malcolm Arnold adds much to the film, and Alan Burgess, whose book "The Small Woman" is the basis of the story, wrote the script, which is witty, wise and wonderful, with Isobel Lennart.
    Many times I've laughed out loud , and many times I've cried watching this film; it's good for several viewings, as it is epic in scope, and the script has an intelligence that makes it a rare gem. total running time is 158 minutes.

    In the film, Chinese tradition has five "Happiness" wishes: Wealth, longevity, good health, virtue, and a peaceful old age and death. "Each person must decide in their heart what the sixth happiness is".

    4-0 out of 5 stars Break out the Kleenex...
    ...for this manipulative, mawkish tear-jerker. The story feels superficial (you never get a feeling for Aylward's sense of spirituality, only the very ocassional bit of tacked-on religiosity), and it's all grossly sentimental. All those feel-good moments with singing kids and long hugs actually detract from the important message about selfless service by making self-sacrifice seem all too easy and romantic, even in the face of brutal Japanese invasion.

    The casting choices will try your suspsension of disbelief, to say the least: a Swede as an Englishwoman, a hulking German as a half-Dutch/half-Chinese colonel, and an Englishman as a Chinese mandarin. That said, this is still a fun film if you take it for what it is. It boasts an unusual story and exotic setting, and Bergman is as radiant as ever (even if she overacts in a couple scenes). Donat and Jurgens are uqually winning, in their own way.

    Hardly Bergman's best film, but certainly worth a watch if you're a fan.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Noah visits the baby Jesus
    The Inn of the Sixth Happiness was filmed in Wales and the scenery is beautiful. Ingrid Bergman is in top form as Gladys Aylard would be missionary to China. One of my favorite scenes is when her assistant Yang, who has a fondness for Noah and his ark, is telling the diners at the inn that Noah came in his ark to visit the baby Jesus along with the wise men. When she gives him a disapproving look he goes on to explain that even though Noah was born long before Jesus people lived alot longer back then, so no one could say for sure that he couldn't have been there. ... Read more


    19. Batteries Not Included
    Director: Matthew Robbins
    list price: $19.98
    our price: $14.98
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: 0783232047
    Catlog: DVD
    Sales Rank: 3102
    Average Customer Review: 4.21 out of 5 stars
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    Reviews (33)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Critics? HA!
    Go figure..if you pay attention to "editorial reviews" for this little movie, a person would never waste a dime to see it.....but this is AMERICA and we ignore critics!!!! (Read the other customer reviews, they couldn't be any more opposite the opinion of our "critics". Hundreds of times they've hated a movie and it's been terrific, whether at the box office or when it hit video)

    Perhaps there's not enough here for these two to bite into, but Mr. Maltin and Mr. Keogh should be less nasty and critical of this film and criticize something else....Patton, Full Metal Jacket, Platoon, whatever....you can leave this little movie alone...It's for kids, guys. Amusing, while not too heavy except some violence regarding the apartment building with some smashing and burning, which of course is repaired by the "little guys". Small flying saucers, "little guys" as Jessica refers to them, zoom all over New York secretly repairing "stuff" that's not perfect......silly yes, but who cares? It's a fantasy..... Go with it for goodness sake. Hume Cronyn (Frank Riley) and real life wife, Jessica Tandy (Faye Riley) act together in too few a number of films (Cocoon and its sequel, are a couple). Each character in the movie has his/her problems, each prays for a little help and gets it in this most curious way, feeling God answered them in this way.

    It's a fantasy....don't be expecting oscar performances from anyone. Jessica thinks the local fire bombing hood, Carlos, is her deceased son, who was in a car wreck years before. She suffers from altzheimers and so doesn't remember he's dead. Referring to Carlos, as Bobby; all the while he's trying to burn their building to ashes. Elizabeth Pena, (Marissa) is a very pregnant, single female trying to exist day to day with hoodlums harassing her every coming and going at the building. She finds her knight in shining armor, Mason, a not too productive resident painter, and he ends up with our lonely Marissa. It's predictable, but OK.

    Frank McRae, ex-boxer, has been punched one too many times while professionally boxing, yet somehow manages to title the movie during one of his only speaking lines.....figure that one, but that's how the movie got its name, they planned it that way!

    This film may not one win any oscars, but 95% of the movies I'd bother to review, I own; this is one of them and I like a good feeling when I finish a movie.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Cute Film
    When you think about it, there aren't too many movies with a premise like this one. I mean, robot aliens who resemble UFOs that can procreate, raise families, and repair anything at super speed? Pretty unusual.

    Something else unusual is that the plot doesn't focus on the robots but the humans who are each trying to hang on to their little piece of home. The robots offer assistance to the main characters and add some comic relief, but the story centers on the human element. The story is well-told and unfolds at the right pace. I thought the acting was also pretty good.

    There's one last thing worth mentioning. I notice that the video quality has an odd fuzziness to it. It's barely noticeable and not terribly distracting but potential viewers should be made aware of it. Personally it did nothing to detract from my enjoyment of the movie.

    This film was made in 1987 so don't expect the special effects to be impressive by today's standards. Remember that, suspend disbelief, and you'll find *Batteries Not Included to be an entertaining experience.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Not Enough Batteries Could Power This Lame Film
    Another film produced by Spielberg in the vain of "Disney-esque" family fare (i.e. HARRY AND THE HENDERSONS, GOONIES). "Close Encounters" is shrunk down to cute little "tonka toys". The gimmick in *BATTERIES NOT INCLUDED is that the aliens' spaceships (of various shapes for degree of personality) are the characters. You don't see the aliens inside controlling the flying saucers (just like you couldn't see the truck driver in Spielbergs' DUEL). The plot is as old as an OUR GANG short. An evil landlord is about to evict a diverse group of stereotypical poor residences from his tenement slum and the mini-aliens arrive in time to save the day to fight the landlord and his evil henchmen. The actors are then directed to act bewildered, angry, awe-inspired, laugh, cry, and hug each other, around the special effects-laden-E.T. spaceships...(yaaawwwnnn...zzz...zzz!). The title of this movie should be renamed to *ORIGINALITY NOT INCLUDED...or...*ACTING NOT INCLUDED...or...*DIRECTION NOT INCLUDED...or...*BRAINS NOT INCLUDED..or...!

    4-0 out of 5 stars Belongs in every children's collection
    ... whether or not you have kids. It has some moments that might make a four-year-old cling to an adult, but every kid I know likes it. No guns, no bloody fights, no chases, and it still holds their interest.

    There's plenty here for an adult - "dotty grandma" isn't a completely comic character here. She's not just a tragic figure of senility, either, though she's some of both. Mostly, she's just making her way through each day the best she can, and better than people seem willing to believe. Most of the other characters are similarly on the edge but muddling by well enough, with a little help from their friends.

    I honestly can't call this a science fiction movie, despite its SF elements. It's sweet (almost sappy) and funny, the poor-but-honest folk win out over the thugs and evil corporations, and they all live happily ever after. Well, for now, at least.

    If there's ever a list of "most under-rated movies", this one gets my vote. I like it.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A sentimental little beauty from Spielberg
    This 1987 little sentimental ditty was utterly irresistible to the public, even as critics panned it as too schmaltzy. It concerns a squadron of little UFOs who arrive on the room of a NY apartment building, one which is about to be razed as soon as the owners can manage to evict the quirky bunch of tenants. The tenants include Hume Cronin and Jessica Tandy (always and forever a winning pair) as well as a guy who plays a mentally (or emotionally - or maybe both) disabled man who speaks only in set phrases from commercials or TV jingles or product tags, such as that of the title: Batteries Not Included. As the tenants band together to save the lives of the little aliens, including a spine-tingling scene in which one gives birth, the aliens come to the rescue of the folks in danger of eviction - and the tenants, previously a disparate bunch, come together to form a community.
    Heartwarming. Great family entertainment ... Read more


    20. My Favorite Martian - The Complete First Season
    Director: Alan Rafkin, Byron Paul, James Komack, James V. Kern, Wes Kenney, David Alexander, Oscar Rudolph, Sheldon Leonard, Sidney Miller, Leslie Goodwins, Jean Yarbrough, John Erman, Mel Ferber
    list price: $39.95
    our price: $31.96
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B0002T7YYO
    Catlog: DVD
    Sales Rank: 5143
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