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1. Kavanagh QC, Set 1
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2. Kavanagh Q.C. - Mute of Malice
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3. Kavanagh Q.C. - Diplomatic Baggage
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4. Second Sight 1
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5. Inspector Morse - Deadly Slumber
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6. Inspector Morse - The Remorseful
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7. Inspector Morse - Twilight of
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8. Inspector Morse: Last Bus to Woodstock
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9. Inspector Morse - The Dead of
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10. Inspector Morse - Cherubim &
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11. Inspector Morse - The Wench Is
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12. Inspector Morse - The Settling
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13. Inspector Morse - The Day of the
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14. Inspector Morse - The Silent World
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15. Inspector Morse - Masonic Mysteries
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16. Inspector Morse - Driven to Distraction
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17. Inspector Morse - Greeks Bearing
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18. Inspector Morse - Infernal Serpent
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19. Inspector Morse - The Way Through
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20. Inspector Morse - Who Killed Harry

1. Kavanagh QC, Set 1
Director: Peter Smith, Charles Beeson, Tristram Powell, Ferdinand Fairfax, Paul Greengrass, Renny Rye, Colin Gregg, Ken Grieve, Jack Gold, David Thacker
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Asin: B000641YUU
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 6825
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Amazon.com

The fact that John Thaw was able to make his eponymous character in Kavanagh Q.C. stand out as a unique personality distinct from the superficially similar Inspector Morse says much about his understated skills as an actor. Thaw brought his trademark mixture of curmudgeonly belligerence and gruff sensitivity to Kavanagh, but the barrister--who first appeared on British television screens in 1995 while the Oxford detective was still alive and kicking--is no polished-up Morse. He is far more worldly, is married, and has a family. And although he is often troubled by his cases, he is never afraid to play the system. He knows that there are devious, even superficial lawyers, some of them in his own chambers, whom hemust face across the courtroom, but he acknowledges them as an unavoidableaspect of the world in which he works. The plots are often convoluted, but Kavanagh's wielding of the trusty sword oftruth is always irresistible, particularly when the case involves some kind of high level government aberration. The four episodes included in Set 1 are "Nothing But the Truth," "Heartland," "A Family Affair," and "The Sweetest Thing."--Piers Ford ... Read more


2. Kavanagh Q.C. - Mute of Malice
Director: Peter Smith, Charles Beeson, Tristram Powell, Ferdinand Fairfax, Paul Greengrass, Renny Rye, Colin Gregg, Ken Grieve, Jack Gold, David Thacker
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Asin: B0007VRPBE
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 4975
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Description

John Thaw (Inspector Morse) is masterful and feisty British barrister, James Kavanagh, a top member of Queen’s Counsel, in this powerful courtroom drama series. Fundamental to his success in court is Kavanagh’s fierce desire for justice as he ferrets out the truth with rapier-like prowess, making even the stalwart criminal buckle. However, professional triumphs have a way of aggravating Kavanagh’s personal inadequacies at home and challenge his teetering balancing act between family and the pursuit of justice. ... Read more

Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Another Collection of Briefs from My Learned Friend.
In this collection of Kavanagh Q.C. stories, three disparate stories are tackled.

In each case it appears from the outset that the cases are hopeless but the outcome is very different. For me this is the season of shows where the family life of Kavanagh takes more of a back seat to the courtroom and, to a certain extent the office politics occupy more of a background position. This suggests that the class conflicts which were highlighted in the earlier shows have a much more subordinate role here. It may be my ears too but Thaw's northern regional accent is a lot less noticeable here.

"Mute of Malice" is the first of the three episodes in this collection. It is concerned with an Army Chaplin, accused of the murder of his brother, who appears reluctant to speak in his own defence at the trial. This tense drama shows the frustrations felt on all sides by this situation with battlelines drawn within the family. It interweaves a harrowing tale of British troops involvement in Bosnia and the horrors discovered whilst there and which ultimately is involved with the resolution of the issue. There are some wonderful performances in this show, not least of all Thaw who reflects all of our horror of war.

In "Blood Money", Kavanagh takes on a case of negligence against a medical doctor over the death of a woman's husband. This particular episode takes on a much greater significance in view of the recent death of John Thaw as the widow is played by Thaw's real life wife, Shiela Hancock. This adds a great poignancy to the show and highlights the great loss Thaw will be to British acting. In this show what should be a relatively straightforward operation goes wrong and a man dies. His widow, convinced of the negligence of the doctor in charge of the operation, sues. What follows is a case of intrigue and social pressure as the case draws in people who would prefer the action to be dropped as it threatens to expose a huge can of worms. Kavanagh is ultimately successful, despite beaurocratic obduracy and obrstruction, in finding the truth and bringing the widow peace of mind.

In the final of the three programs, "Ancient History", Kavanagh revisits an issue previously addressed in an Inspector Morse episode, that of War Crimes. In this disturbing account of man's inhumanity of man, Kavanagh is placed in the almost impossible position of prosecuting a case where the principal witnesses last saw the accused some fifty years before. Adding to the difficulty is the fact that one of the witnesses dies during the pre-trial hearing and another complication occurs when another witness refuses to return from Poland. Almost at the end of the trial when the defendent appears to be aquitted, a defense witness brings her testimony before the court which seems to finalise the result but Kavanagh, not losing hope, rescues the situation. This episode typifies more than many others, the concern with social issues and their treatment before the law. This concern, manifested in the show, has a way of helping us, the viewers, identify with the concerns and clarify our own views on those subjects.

All in all an excellent mini-series which will be revisited again and again. First class production. Alas the DVD set contains little of refinement or extras compared with the VHS set but the availability of the shows for the first time on DVD more than compensates for these minor inadequacies. I hope that it will not be too long before the rest of the shows folow.

All rise.

... Read more


3. Kavanagh Q.C. - Diplomatic Baggage
Director: Peter Smith, Charles Beeson, Tristram Powell, Ferdinand Fairfax, Paul Greengrass, Renny Rye, Colin Gregg, Ken Grieve, Jack Gold, David Thacker
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Asin: B0007VRPB4
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 4830
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Description

In this superlative courtroom drama series, John Thaw (Inspector Morse) is respected and feisty British barrister, James Kavanagh, a top member of Queen’s Counsel. Beneath the powdered wig and sombre robes is a relentless mind able to tear the truth from a tangle of legalese, lies and desperate excuses. Even as his professional triumphs mask a troubled private life, James Kavanagh will go to any lengths to see justice served. ... Read more


4. Second Sight 1
Director: Charles Beeson
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Asin: B0001WTUIU
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 13953
Average Customer Review: 4.45 out of 5 stars
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Description

From Paula Milne, the multi-award winning writer of The Politician's Wife, comes this taut psychological thriller starring Clive Owen (Croupier, Closer) and Claire Skinner (Inspector Morse).Ross Tanner (Owen) is a hotshot police detective who lives for the thrill of the chase—while desperate to conceal a terrifying secret: he's losing his vision. Competitive graduate officer D.I. Catherine Tully (Skinner) is drafted into Tanner's crime unit to help investigate an apparently motiveless murder of a nineteen-year-old college student. Soon enough Catherine realized the nature of Tanner's dreadful secret and an uneasy alliance is formed between them. She will be his eyes, on certain conditions—terms which will enhance her career prospects.As Tanner's relationship with the world becomes increasingly fragile he learns that there is more to murder than meets the eye. Insight prevails over eyesight as he discovers that success and survival will depend on the use of all his senses.Special DVD features include: link to the Mystery! Web site; scene selections; closed captions; and described video for the visually impaired.On one DVD9 disc.Region coding: All regions.Audio: Dolby stereo.Screen format: Letterboxed. ... Read more

Reviews (11)

5-0 out of 5 stars SPELLBINDING HERO MAKES SERIES CRACKLE.
Fans of the art house cult hit CROUPIER will delight in this first entry in yet another first-rate British mystery series. Clive Owen, who made Jack Manfred a classic antihero in CROUPIER, fleshes out a fascinating character in DCI Ross Tanner as the SECOND SIGHT series begins with this two-tape set. Tanner is a divorced (aren't they always?) workaholic with an ambitious ex-wife and an adoring young son who seems to double as Tanner's only real friend. In this go-round, Tanner is beginning to lose his eyesight to a rare disease for which there stands no present cure. Hiding his condition and his terror is not going to be easy, however. The fadeouts are unpredictable and often frightening and his new partner, Catherine Tully, is on to him. Equally ambitious, and out to correct an old wrong, Tully offers to be Tanner's eyes if he will give her a crack at their new case--the death of a young university student in his own backyard while no one in the family seemed to notice.

Claire Skinner is, as always, expert and enjoyable to watch but its Clive Owen's show all the way. His unconventional good looks and rugged exterior share space with a tender, devoted father and a fair-minded, ingenious detective but Owen also gives Ross Tanner something else, that rarest of things in movie characters--the suggestion of an inner life which is every bit as fascinating as his day-to-day crime solving. Great production values and fine supporting performances (especially from Stuart Wilson and Phoebe Nicholls) make SECOND SIGHT a must for any British mystery video library.

5-0 out of 5 stars Thank God for the BBC!
This two-part episode is the first of four engrossing mysteries with stoic, sexy DCI Ross Tanner (Clive Owen) leading a detective unit investigating really gruesome murders. Brilliant but star-crossed Tanner is strickened with a rare virus that is destroying his eyesight so he must conceal his ailment to keep on working, which leaves him vunerable for the first time in his life. Forced to use his other senses to compensate, he methodically sets out to solve the cases anyhow. The visuals are just great as the viewer experiences things from his perspective: hallucinations, blurred images, great flashes of light and vertigo. In his personal life, he goes from rollerblading, bar-hopping and neglecting his parential duties to having his bitter ex-wife eat crow, having his young son pity him and having an affair with a co-worker who is willing to assist him to further her own career. Try to watch the 4 well-written episodes in order so you can observe his subtle character arc which seems very genuine as he heroically struggles against a major disability and works through deep denial. The supporting cast is very good and their characters seem very genuine. His apartment is very cool. Yeah, BBC! This refers to VHS, I don't think the first part is available in DVD. Just one more reason to not ditch the VHS player just yet.

4-0 out of 5 stars Clive Owen is Hot
It's a predictable mystery but it's well packaged and, as I said, Clive Owen is hot! There's some intensely erotic moments in this series that make it worth watching even though the average mystery fan will have the plot all figured out way before the climax.

Yes, I've admitted elsewhere that I am incredibly shallow at times, and this is one of them.

5-0 out of 5 stars Touching and Creative - not your typical detective show!
I found this show on at 1 am one night, and was caught. I didn't know what day it played, or at first what channel it was on, so I found myself staying up, flipping channels to find it. After that I realized it might be better to use the TV Guide. This is a wonderful show. It's star is arresting, both vulnerable and strong at the same time. I try to avoid watching anything that doesn't catch my creative eye, and this did, completely. Such a show you would normally assume to be firmly within the usual "detective show" genre. It wasn't. It was wonderful. Creative, imaginative, touching and appealing. Beginning to end it was awesome.

5-0 out of 5 stars Amazing! I loved it.
I highly recommend Second Sight and its sequel.
I think I have a new favorite actor... Clive. I hope I can find him in other features. He was just superb. A very compelling actor. I hope to see him in some big feature films in the US. He is an actor to watch. There's a lot of meat there in his acting ability. ... Read more


5. Inspector Morse - Deadly Slumber
Director: Danny Boyle, Stephen Whittaker, Sandy Johnson, Herbert Wise, Edward Bennett, Anthony Simmons, Charles Beeson, John Madden, Stuart Orme, Alastair Reid, Colin Gregg, Brian Parker, James Scott, Peter Hammond, Antonia Bird, Jack Gold, Jim Goddard, Adrian Shergold, Roy Battersby, Peter Duffell
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Asin: B0000A2ZND
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 10085
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Morse at his best, part two
The Inspector Morse series is one of the greatest in detective drama. While Colin Dexter's books are marvels of intricate (and occasionally bizarre) plot twists, the movies focus more on the characters involved...and in this movie (and "Who Killed Harry Field") especially so. The mystery is good, but the kinship between Morse and chief suspect Michael Steppings is best thing about this particular episode. It's one of those great films where the bad guys and good guys seem to have reversed roles, and the whole mystery hinges on one small slip...#2 on the list of the five greatest Morses! ... Read more


6. Inspector Morse - The Remorseful Day
Director: Danny Boyle, Stephen Whittaker, Sandy Johnson, Herbert Wise, Edward Bennett, Anthony Simmons, Charles Beeson, John Madden, Stuart Orme, Alastair Reid, Colin Gregg, Brian Parker, James Scott, Peter Hammond, Antonia Bird, Jack Gold, Jim Goddard, Adrian Shergold, Roy Battersby, Peter Duffell
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Asin: B000056T50
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 14310
Average Customer Review: 4.78 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

An unsolved murder case is reopened after a suspect is released from jail, but when he and two of his associates are found dead, detectives Inspector Morse and Sergeant Lewis face one of their most difficult investigations, and Morse's involvement may be more personal than he is willing to admit.

The final case for British television's best-loved detective is suffused with melancholy. Years of stress and far too much beer have taken their toll, and Morse is a sick man. Popping pills, wincing with pain, and drinking in spite of doctor's orders, Morse keeps going because he is obsessed with bringing criminals to justice. It's impossible to imagine him in retirement, but his vocation has ruined his health and now threatens his life.

The complex relationship between Morse and his partner has always been at the heart of the show's success, and at the beginning of "The Remorseful Day," that relationship is even more strained than usual.Lewis is furious when Morse takes over his investigation into the multiple murders, and the ailing Morse is more irritable than ever. But in spite of all their differences the two men complement one another and they are soon working together again. When this final episode moves into its final act Kevin Whately's performance as the faithful, underappreciated Lewis is deeply moving, providing a fitting coda to their enduring partnership.

The accompanying documentary includes behind-the-scenes footage, interviews with many of the distinguished actors who have appeared in the show over the years, and comments from Morse's creator, Colin Dexter. --Simon Leake ... Read more

Reviews (9)

4-0 out of 5 stars A REMORSEFUL ADAPTATION
There's been a murder here, but it's not the one you think. The adaptation of Colin Dexter's "The Remorseful Day" has left a stinking corpse of what was a masterful story, an exquisite exposition of the "Parsifal" like heart of Endeavour Morse. The culprits? Rebecca Eaton and her doltish cadre of American PBS writers who have distinguished themselves in missing the entire point of the book.
Mind you, if you have not read the book, you'll enjoy this video. All the great elements are there: John Thaw essays Morse brilliantly, Kevin Whately turns in a terrific performance as Lewis, although he is compelled to deliver a totally ridiculous and melodramatic "Morse is dead!" proclamation. He acquits himself and moves on. All the supporting players, the family intrigues, the score, the filmwork - all executed brilliantly. So, you'd have little reason to suspect something is awry.

But there is and it is as great a disservice to a book as I can ever remember. Now, that argument can be made about a lot of transfers from book to film, but in this case, and with this series, which has been so faithful to Dexter's works, it is just incomprehensible. I can only conclude that it is due to the American fascination with smoothing out any sense of nuance in order to champion the easily digestible. I should tell you where the crime lies, but that's not fair to anyone who really would enjoy what actually happened in the story. Suffice it to say that much of the story turns on the Parsifal legend, and how in fact the pure of heart are vindicated with vision of the grail, whatever form that grail may take. So, Endeavour Morse is vindicated in a coda that lingers with you long, long after you put the book down. Throughout the film, there are efforts made to quote not only Wagner's theme for "Parsifal", but Han Knappertsbusch's direction of it in the 1962 score. Why? Well, Morse makes reference to it in discussion with Lewis, and it fits with the T.S Elliott quote that includes the title of the story, plus Knappertsbusch was himself the most Morse like of conductors in every way imaginable, and in 1962 was well aware that he was dying. So with all of the main clues in tact, why on earth Eaton and her merry band of nitwits elected to miss the point is not only unimaginable but unforgiveable.

Certainly, enjoy this DVD for what it is. I assure you that if you read the book, you will want, as I want, to grab the murderous crutch and shove it where PBS don't broadcast. The most heinous murder in Oxford was committed in Boston. Shame on Eaton. Perhaps one day Dexter will insist on a reshoot, although Thaw is not well, and Whately may have no interest in any further casting as Lewis. Somehow, the record, as it is in the book, needs to be set straight.

5-0 out of 5 stars Morse's End Predates John Thaw's by Only a Few Years
Sad to see that the great actor, John Thaw has passed away from esophageal cancer.

This episode is on par with all of the other great episodes of this outstanding series. Thaw's portrayal of an intellectual, world-weary British detective who confronts often complex and involved cases of murder and other crimes.

Now episode to this point really brought home to me how much I loved Inspector Morse. I was actually quite angry to see the great Inspector face such health problems (an understatement), but in light of John Thaw's actual illness, I guess it is to be expected.

My only regret is that there are not 100 more episodes hidden away somewhere. Inspector Morse and John Thaw will be sorely missed.

5-0 out of 5 stars Relish the Well-done Remorseful Day
This is probably one of the best (if not *the* best) Inspector Morse television episode. I admit to alot of that bias *not* going toward it for being the final installment of the series, but more for it being such a WELL-DONE final installment of the series.

The obligatory murder plot/premise has to do with the re-opening of a case involving the death of a middle-aged temptress/nurse named Yvonne Harrison. Lewis and Morse tackle the case, with the latter acting particularly strange concerning many aspects of the matter. There are a plethora of suspects, one of whom is Morse's own doctor, which conveniently leads to scenes showing how the great Chief Inspector's health is deteriorating rapidly. The Harrison case, while definitely being worked-through carefully, isn't the real focus of the story.

Morse's plight is the prime meaning behind "The Remorseful Day". Never before has the character been rendered so human, and so pathetic. His lady-friend (appearing in recent TV adaptations) has apparently left him, and so Morse is utterly alone. There are poignant scenes between he and Lewis, of him making final preparations, and of him sitting alone in his home listening to profoundly sad classical music. John Thaw as Morse gives a veritable tour-de-force, in the most subtle and gracious way possible, of the great detective in his declining days.

Special note should be given to all involved in the television adaptation, for they have, in my opinion, surpassed the novel. Colin Dexter's book was fine, but it dealt more heavily with the actual murder case, and the illness of Morse was left for small parts, usually at the end of each day. Here, with the version made for the small screen, we have the situation of Morse's closing life brought to the forefront. It is done well, and an experience to watch.

The last scene is terribly moving. I always make it a point to realize that when I sit down to watch a movie or television show, NOT to get too emotional, because there are only actors upon the screen - nothing is real. I thought I would be able to hold forth with said beliefs while watching "The Remorseful Day". But the very last scene, involving just Lewis and Morse, brought tears to my eyes. The swelling music and the starkness of the scene was a wonderful way to end the series.

The impression left is one not easily forgotten.

4-0 out of 5 stars Please Endeavour to Read this Review!
As a final good-bye to a wonderful series, I was disappointed in "The Remorseful Day." It is a sad and touching film where Chief Inspector Morse bids a fond farewell; however, the film is somewhat disjointed. Morse, more ill than ever -- due to his lack of caring for his health -- exits via a simple myocardial infarction! Couldn't it have been more dramatic or move moving than this?!!! One scene, however, prior to the last touching scene in the mortuary is excellent. It is the night before Morse's death (unbeknownst to him, of course) where he is sitting on his sofa. The look on his face is pathetic and tells the viewer everything. It is without doubt (to me) one of the best scenes in the film -- almost like the blind girl discovering that Chaplin was her benefactor in "City Lights." It is done without words -- only facial expressions.

Alas, our hero has to die and he exits rather pitifully telling Strange to "thank Lewis." I wanted something much more dramatic and much more moving; I suspect Mr. Dexter really does want to retire. The last scene -- when Lewis views Morse's body on a slab and leans over to kiss him -- is very moving and will bring a tear to the eyes of every Morse fan. Although he may have had a rich and rewarding life in his own way with his work, music, poetry and knowledge, I wanted him to go out differently, to have had a woman who really loved him, to have had something in life so very meaningful.... We will miss a very good fictional character and the actors who portrayed the detectives so well. However, thanks to the magic of the movies, we can enjoy the Inspector for years to come!

5-0 out of 5 stars Goodbye old friend
The loss of "Chief Inspector Morse" hit me just as hard in this, Thaw's, last appearance as this fictional character as the real loss of Jeremy Bret ending the greatest rendition of Sherlock Holmes since the death of Basil Rathbone. Even watching the videos of all the other "cases" is bittersweet as the memory of Lewis kissing Morses' head goodbye in the closing scene now overshadows them all. The true sign of an actors actor making a written character live so vividly. A must see for any Morse fan- just be sure to have the hanky handy and see all the other Morses- first. ... Read more


7. Inspector Morse - Twilight of the Gods
Director: Danny Boyle, Stephen Whittaker, Sandy Johnson, Herbert Wise, Edward Bennett, Anthony Simmons, Charles Beeson, John Madden, Stuart Orme, Alastair Reid, Colin Gregg, Brian Parker, James Scott, Peter Hammond, Antonia Bird, Jack Gold, Jim Goddard, Adrian Shergold, Roy Battersby, Peter Duffell
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Asin: B0000A2ZNC
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 9463
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars This was a very funny Morse!
It was very fuuny and sad. Poor Morse he had to learn the hard way . And I love the music and where the flimed it! ... Read more


8. Inspector Morse: Last Bus to Woodstock
Director: Danny Boyle, Stephen Whittaker, Sandy Johnson, Herbert Wise, Edward Bennett, Anthony Simmons, Charles Beeson, John Madden, Stuart Orme, Alastair Reid, Colin Gregg, Brian Parker, James Scott, Peter Hammond, Antonia Bird, Jack Gold, Jim Goddard, Adrian Shergold, Roy Battersby, Peter Duffell
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Asin: B000069HRT
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 17456
Average Customer Review: 5 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars At last -- Inspector Morse's first novel comes to video!
Inspector Morse is cerebral, almost an armchair decetcive in the Sherlock Holmes tradition. This video is based on the first Morse novel, but came about halfway through the series' run on ITV. John Thaw is notable in his performance because he almost underplays the role of Morse, and Kevin Whatley as Sergeant Lewis makes a good Watson, trying to understand Morse's thought process, and providing a lens through which us viewers of merely average intellect can comprehend how Morse's mind works. This will never appeal to a general audience, but it's very enjoyable to those at whom it's targeted. ... Read more


9. Inspector Morse - The Dead of Jericho / The Mystery of Morse
Director: Danny Boyle, Stephen Whittaker, Sandy Johnson, Herbert Wise, Edward Bennett, Anthony Simmons, Charles Beeson, John Madden, Stuart Orme, Alastair Reid, Colin Gregg, Brian Parker, James Scott, Peter Hammond, Antonia Bird, Jack Gold, Jim Goddard, Adrian Shergold, Roy Battersby, Peter Duffell
list price: $29.98
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Asin: B000056T4S
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 16090
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com

John Thaw brought one of Britain's best-loved TV detectives to life in this telefilm that started the long-running Inspector Morseseries, based on the novels by Colin Dexter. The brilliant, somewhat elitist police inspector who loves crosswords, classical music, and more than the occasional pint of ale clumsily romances a woman (Gemma Jones) from his choir. When he finds her hanged in her apartment on the eve of their big recital, he suspects murder and muscles his way in on the investigation. All the assigned investigators are convinced it's suicide except for the eager Sergeant Lewis (Kevin Whately), and Morse and Lewis reluctantly team up to sort out a mystery tangled in blackmail, adultery, peeping neighbors (former Doctor Who Patrick Troughton), and mistaken identities.

With his snooty temperament and lone-wolf lifestyle, the white-haired,Oxford educated bachelor is a wonderful mismatch with the younger Lewis, a married man with a family and a rather less classical background. There's a quiet undercurrent of affection and respect that builds with each continuing Inspector Morse mystery, as well as an air of melancholia and loneliness beautifully developed in the script by future Oscar®-winning writer-director Anthony Minghella (The English Patient). Morse's initial theories may be washouts (a series hallmark), but his relentless sleuthing, eye for clues, and mind for puzzles dredges up the answer in the end, even as he loses the girl.

The DVD also features the 50-minute documentary The Mystery of Morse, a kind of character study built around a tour of Morse series shooting locations. It features interviews with the stars, the producer, the composer, and author Colin Dexter. --Sean Axmaker ... Read more

Reviews (2)

4-0 out of 5 stars Very good title to own, great story
If you've ever watched an Inspector Morse story this, the first one, is as good as any of them. For those who haven't seen Morse on PBS or A&E this is a good start because the story has all that a police story needs and does it well. It is English which will turn just a few people off but do try it, so much better than most of the stuff on television.

5-0 out of 5 stars A Different Kettle of Fish...
THE DEAD OF JERICO was the first Inspector Morse tale broadcast in the U.S. on 'Mystery Theatre', the series developed by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (PBS). For those with an intellectual bent, this series was "heady" stuff. Morse is the hard drinking, Wagnerian loving, Jaguar driving, crossword-puzzle working, police officer created by the Oxford writer and acrostics maestro Sir Colin Dexter. Played by the wonderful actor John Thaw, Morse is known only by his last name. His first--Endeavor, for the famous Nelson ship--remains a secret to most. Morse code buried in the theme music by Phelong Barrington spells out M-O-R-S-E.

In THE DEAD OF JERICO, Morse acquires his trusty sidekick, the loveable Lewis played by Kevin Whately, whom, by way of introduction he informs, "I'm a different kettle of fish." An intellectual loner, Morse has a less than sucessful way with women, and in THE DEAD OF JERICO his bad luck is evident. His love interest a woman named Anne, played by Gemma Jones (the mother in SENSE AND SENSIBILITY and THE WINSLOW BOY, which she also co-produced). Anne is a piano teacher and member of the the Oxford Community Choir along with Morse.

Anne lives in a newly refurbished town house in Jerico, a gentrified neighborhood in the city of Oxford. After choir practice, Morse walks her home, and occasionally they have a drink in the local pub or she makes him a cup of tea at her place. One day, Anne fails to appear for a scheduled choir performance. When Morse goes to check on her after the concert, he discovers the police have found her dead. Who killed her and why? Or, did she die by her own hand? At the beginning, Morse is viewed as an intruder by the officer assigned to the case due to his involvement with the deceased, but soon Morse is placed in charge of the investigation.

This is not a run-of-the-mill mystery. THE DEAD OF JERICO is a wonderful adaptation of one of Colin Dexter's fine books. Anthony Minghella directed this tale, and then went on to direct THE ENGLISH PATIENT, for which he won an Oscar. Kevin Whately (Sergeant Lewis) also had a role in THE ENGLISH PATIENT--as one of the two sappers who defused bombs left by the Nazis.

The DVD version of THE DEAD OF JERICO is outstanding. The cinematograpy is excellent, the color is clear and bright. The film is filled with footage showing the City of Oxford and the University, and if you're an Anglophile you will love this film for these shots alone. Inspector Morse's red Jaguar never looked better--in between repair jobs. I love the Morse series and recommend this DVD for your collection. You will watch it more than once. ... Read more


10. Inspector Morse - Cherubim & Seraphim
Director: Danny Boyle, Stephen Whittaker, Sandy Johnson, Herbert Wise, Edward Bennett, Anthony Simmons, Charles Beeson, John Madden, Stuart Orme, Alastair Reid, Colin Gregg, Brian Parker, James Scott, Peter Hammond, Antonia Bird, Jack Gold, Jim Goddard, Adrian Shergold, Roy Battersby, Peter Duffell
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5-0 out of 5 stars Time Capsule Morse
If there was any program that got the closest to reflecting correctly life in Britain during the 80s and 90s, it was Inspector Morse.

While "Masonic Mysteries" and "Last Seen Wearing" are probably the best of the mysteries, "Cherubim and Seraphim" is the one that captures the British 80s/90s Zeitgeist best. The direction of this program is as good as any well-done British thriller.

It was end of an era. Now you'll understand Peter Hitchens.

5-0 out of 5 stars A Mystery Which Hits [Morse] Close to Home
"Cherubim & Seraphim", the second Inspector Morse episode to be directed by Danny Boyle (the other was "Masonic Mysteries"; an episode which literally hits Morse close to home!), who's the well-renowned director behind such feature-films as Trainspotting and The Beach, and features his trademark directorial style, deviates from the norm in terms of the way in which the plot unfolds: unlike other Morse episodes, instead of being a conventional - or not-so, in some cases - whodunit, all along the audience knows who the guilty party is, à la Columbo. The culprit in this case is the procurer of ecstasy-like drugs, played by Jason Isaacs [The Patriot], in yet another evil role. The script centers around the fact three youths have died by suicidal means and, as we find out, had all been partaking, days anterior to their deaths, in the aforementioned drug. The youths' walls were adorned posters in their rooms containing computer-generated patterns which represent the "Chaos Theory" (e.g. if a butterfly is beating its wings somewhere, there will be a hurricane somewhere else, and these two seemingly unrelated events are in fact interrelate), which Sgt. Lewis is more that happy to explain to Morse; and they were all in the same type of eclectic dance music. It's one of the more personal Inspector Morse episodes, as one of the deceased youths happens to be Morse's step-niece; it also shows how out of touch Morse is with contemporary youth culture (drugs/sex/music) and children in general. For instance, when Morse stops by the school to interview his step-niece's best friend who was the last person to see her alive, he unwittingly stumbles in to her euphemistically-titled "Personal & Social Development" class just when the teacher is asking a student if he knows what the contraceptive device she's holding in her hand is. He's taken aback by the mere fact that they're having a teacher-student discussion, no less a class, about sex in school. In this episode, Morse reveals some of his past secrets to Lewis, whom he addresses, in a rarely captured televised moment, by his first name ("Robbie"). Three of the revelations include how his parents frequently fought and their subsequent brake-up, one of his low points as a morose 15-year-old, and the roots of the acrimonious relationship he continues to have with his step-mother. Definitely one of the best Morse films for catching a glimpse into his upbringing. Even the dance-oriented music in this episode, which incorporates classical music into its medley, is really well done. Overall it's another superlative self-contained film featuring Chief Inspector Morse. ... Read more


11. Inspector Morse - The Wench Is Dead
Director: Danny Boyle, Stephen Whittaker, Sandy Johnson, Herbert Wise, Edward Bennett, Anthony Simmons, Charles Beeson, John Madden, Stuart Orme, Alastair Reid, Colin Gregg, Brian Parker, James Scott, Peter Hammond, Antonia Bird, Jack Gold, Jim Goddard, Adrian Shergold, Roy Battersby, Peter Duffell
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Reviews (6)

3-0 out of 5 stars Fair episode, poorly designed DVD
As others have pointed out, Sgt. Lewis does not appear in this, the penultimate Morse. Apparently, it was because of a contract dispute between the studio/producers and actor Kevin Whately. Despite his absence, and Morse being bound to a hospital bed for most of the program, it's a decent and entertaining episode.

My real complaint is with the quality of the DVD. As with others in this series, the makers of this disk have done a poor job packaging Morse. It's almost comical that this is the only disk in the series for which they've included a photo of Lewis, yet it's the only episode he's not in! I gave up on buying these Region 1 disks long ago. Instead, I bought the complete series from the UK (an elegant package of the whole set is available through Amazon.co.uk) and picked up a multi-regional DVD player on which to watch them. The series and the player together cost about the same as the series would cost if you bought all of the U.S. editions.

5-0 out of 5 stars A few comments on this episode
As others have pointed out, no lewis in this particular episode. But that's ok really, if you like the rest of the series. If you are a fan of the series, you are aware that the 33 total episodes are either loosely based on or slightly related to Colin Dexter's handful of novels, and are not meant to replace or represent fundamentally his work in anyway. Besides, in the book Lewis is an unimportant character, so his absence is no gaping a hole. At the time Kevin Whatley was working on other television programs and films. John Thaw was as well (Kavannagh QC) but you really really really can't have Morse without Morse. So, disregarding the absence of Lewis and the plot changes, this is still a great episode. Not the best, but its still better than watching Murder She Wrote or Diagnosis Murder.

4-0 out of 5 stars Morse the Time Traveler
As junior XXX pointed out in his/her review, this episode features no Sergeant Lewis. He's nowhere to be found for whatever reason. But even in the novel, the character of Lewis is less than integral to the plot.

While you (we) can only guess at the film adaptation's dumping of Lewis, I found this a most enjoyable episode of Inspector Morse, as we flashback to the year 1859, complete with haunting period music. It's an interesting combination of Morse and "period piece." It not only foreshadows "what's to come" in "The Remorseful Day", it virtually sets up the "last Morse."

Lastly, I have not read all of the Dexter novels, but of the few I have read, this film adaptation strays farthest from the original novel. It ain't just Sergeant Lewis missing. There are other fundamental plot and character changes. Once you get over the substantial changes, you may find, like me, that this is one of the more enjoyable episodes of Morse.

2-0 out of 5 stars the weakest Morse of all....where Lewis?
instead of sergeant lewis helping an ill Morse solve a case that is 140 years old, there is a new copper name kershaw. i forgot the name of the actor who played kershaw yet i don't care because he is so bloody awful. once kershaw enters the picture, THE WENCH IS DEAD goes downhill. as always, john thaw is fine as morse. hey, sgt lewis is in the novel. he is mentioned once in the tv movie but nowhere to be seen. perhaps kevin whately (as lewis) was too busy making another popular UK tv series "Peak Practice" where he plays a doctor. thankfully whately and john thaw reunite for the final Morse film THE REMORSEFUL DAY. see it instead and forget THE WENCH IS DEAD.

5-0 out of 5 stars Wierdly wonderfull.
A wonderfull piece of work.His last ? Do not panic, do not fret,he's just gone down "The Trout" for a quick half. In England,we've already seen the next concocksion of murder,dry hummour,pubs and the ever present American tourists !!!! ... Read more


12. Inspector Morse - The Settling of the Sun
Director: Danny Boyle, Stephen Whittaker, Sandy Johnson, Herbert Wise, Edward Bennett, Anthony Simmons, Charles Beeson, John Madden, Stuart Orme, Alastair Reid, Colin Gregg, Brian Parker, James Scott, Peter Hammond, Antonia Bird, Jack Gold, Jim Goddard, Adrian Shergold, Roy Battersby, Peter Duffell
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3-0 out of 5 stars Not one of the better films....
THE SETTLING OF THE SUN is not one of the better Morse films. The acting is stagy and overdone. The camera shots are bizarre and awkward. The hotch-potch use of elements from other more successful filmed versions of Colin Dexter's books, such as "Last Seen Wearing", "Last Bus to Woodstock" and "The Dead of Jericho" is insulting to the knowing fan.

I am not sure this film is based on a book. I don't remember reading a book with this title, nor did I find the plot familiar. (I thought I had read all of Colin Dexter's 'Morse' books.) If it is based on a book, the plot is certainly far inferior to those found other tales.

The tortured and unbelievable plot is overlaid with repetitious use of "Morse-isms" which are supposed to "wow" American audiences such as: Morse thinking over a pint in a friendly tavern; Morse driving his little red jaguar all over Oxford; Morse playing music and drinking at home; Morse unwilling to look at a body (three times with the same body). Morse's interest in the female "lead" is far from enthusiastic. It's almost as if he is going through the motions. Also, it's a bit hard to believe that this ditsy overwrought female has the least bit of attractiveness for Morse.

Don't get me wrong. I love the little "English" touches a much as the next Anglophile. I just hate being taken for a sucker. However,if you are devoted Morse fan you will probably want to buy it. Just can't get enough of the late John Thaw.

5-0 out of 5 stars Possiby the Darkest of All the Inspector Morse Films
The undertones in "Setting of the Sun" deal with war and the moral repercussions thereof. Its direction is, along with "Service of All the Dead," among the most bleak and atmospheric of the Morse films. Another commonality which this film shares with the aforementioned film is its convoluted-yet-plausible plot, consisting of a rather intricate conspiracy theory. It may take a couple viewings for you to comprehend, it certainly did for me. Inspector Morse is asked to present a prize for a crossword competition at a summer school in Londsdale college for a group of overseas students. A murder conducted in a gruesome manner takes place while Morse is dining with the group. It turns out his presence was not incidental; he was meant to be a witness. Jane Robson's, Morse's love interest and the person who invited him to present the prize, feelings for Morse are not mutual in this episode. The uncertain long-term implications of war are beautifully presented at the end with the innocent view of Morse's love interest's daughter, when asked about her grandfather, whose suffering during the war was the impetus behind the conspiracy. ... Read more


13. Inspector Morse - The Day of the Devil
Director: Danny Boyle, Stephen Whittaker, Sandy Johnson, Herbert Wise, Edward Bennett, Anthony Simmons, Charles Beeson, John Madden, Stuart Orme, Alastair Reid, Colin Gregg, Brian Parker, James Scott, Peter Hammond, Antonia Bird, Jack Gold, Jim Goddard, Adrian Shergold, Roy Battersby, Peter Duffell
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14. Inspector Morse - The Silent World of Nicholas Quinn
Director: Danny Boyle, Stephen Whittaker, Sandy Johnson, Herbert Wise, Edward Bennett, Anthony Simmons, Charles Beeson, John Madden, Stuart Orme, Alastair Reid, Colin Gregg, Brian Parker, James Scott, Peter Hammond, Antonia Bird, Jack Gold, Jim Goddard, Adrian Shergold, Roy Battersby, Peter Duffell
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Average Customer Review: 4.75 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (4)

5-0 out of 5 stars An excellent introduction to the Inspector Morse series.
An Amazon.com reviewer of July 10th has written a superb review of this episode of the extensive series of Morse mysteries and I won't go over ground that he or she has ably covered. For those viewers who are convinced by his/her review to begin watching the Morse mysteries with The Silent World of Nicholas Quinn, I would like to add that the mystery begins with the opening credits.

We are introduced to the deaf Nicholas Quinn, an examiner at a Board based in Oxford, England. He is standing by himself reading the lips of the various people talking with one another at a wine party. We see the obvious concern on his face that something is desperately wrong, but, like him, we can't hear what many of the guests are saying. He does not need to hear; his facility reading lips is evident. He tells another reviewer that the examinations conducted by the Board are compromised and he walks out of the party in distress.

In the next scene, still while the credits are playing, we watch a fire drill at the Examining Board. We don't see Nicholas Quinn leave the building even though we are told that everyone is accounted for. If you watch this scene a second time carefully, many of the clues to unlock the mystery are contained in this first few minutes of the program.

My guess is that most people who view this mystery like solving complicated puzzles and will enjoy watching each clue that Morse uncovers right to the last scene.

John Thaw, unfortunately now dead, was a superb English actor and he found an ideal character to play in the crusty Chief Inspector Morse. Kevin Whately is almost equally as good as his long suffering sidekick, Sergeant Lewis. Viewers who like this early installment will have a chance to watch Morse and Lewis in action many more times in this outstanding and long running series.

5-0 out of 5 stars exquisite!
This has grown to be my favourite Inspector Morse of the entire Morse series! The more I watch this the more enchanted I become with it uncovering little pieces each time. Exquisite indeed!

The murder is set in the arcane world of examiantion boards which were affiliated to some of England's major universities as arbiters of the academic development of students at ages 16 and 18. This obscure branch of academia is nonetheless an ivory tower existance disguising basic human failings of jealousy, greed etc.

When a relatively new examiner is found dead at home the detectives seem to be looking beyond the workplace but in the course of the investigation the examination board becomes the centre of attention.

Essential Morse has three main interests, his love of opera, his appreciation of real ale (microbrews in American parlance), and his fascination of crosswords. It is in the last of these that we find the core to this story. As always the story is composed like a crossword such that the clues must be solved before completing the case. Here, however, the crossword assumes a much greater role. One of the other examiners, and as such a suspect, turns out to be an intellectual hero of Morse, Daedalus, who sets a particu;arly challenging crossword which gives Morse great pleasure. The two men share similar interests and it becomes apparent that they have a similar view of the world. They become competitors in trying to resolve the case but only until Daedalus (played superbly by Michael Gough) is also murdered although he leaves some difficult clues behind.

Another dimension to this story is the love interest of examiner Monica. Again there is a crossword perspective. Morse is intrigued by the physical and intellectual beauty of this woman, but as usual he cannot solve the clues to understanding her. He is torn between his feelings for her as a person and the growing suspicion that she is somehow involved in the murders. Ultimately this conflict is only resolved when it is too late.

The plot twists and turns and has several blind allies but it is compulsive viweing and by the device of Daedelus we get to see a mirror image of Morse the man. Kevin Whately puts in another superb performance as the long suffering Lewis who we perceive as the apprentice of the master but also the master's concience.

An excellent vintage and quite excellent indeed.

The DVD version is a little disappointing in that it delivers a full-screen format with a cleaner sound. Moreover Barrington Phelong's incidental music does not benefit from the transfer. It would certainly benefit from a remastering. The other additional features are minimal but did make me replay the Jeremy Brett version of Arthur Conan Doyle's "Sign of Four" shortly afterwards to find John Thaw in fine form. I am sure that Inspector Morse fans would appreciate the show even more if it was available in the widescreen format but I am afraid that that is unlikely.

Still, this remains an exceptional introduction to the Morse series and an absolute must have for one's fledling DVD collection.

4-0 out of 5 stars Vintage Morse...
THE SILENT WORLD OF NICOLAS QUINN is about a man who works for a syndicate in Oxford England. The business of the syndicate is testing students in underdeveloped countries for the purpose of awarding degrees--one presumes from Oxford University as the syndicate members are all affilitated with various colleges of the university. At a reception for a dignitary from a Middle Eastern country, a hearing impaired professor named Nicholas Quinn reads the lips of two speakers and uncovers an awful truth--cheating is abroad. It seems some or all of the syndicate members are involved in a scam to "sell" test results by providing the answers to the questions beforehand. Quinn shares his concerns with a fellow member of the syndicate and is overheard, or his lips are read, or his confidant betrays him --the end result is murder. (Sherry, crossword puzzles, acrosstics, and ticket stubs for Marlon Brando's "Last Tango.." become important clues.)

The film is vintage Morse. The shots of Oxford are fabulous --some of the best. This episode was part of the set of stories used to introduced Morse to the American viewing public. John Thaw, who plays Inspector Morse, was born in 1942 and sadly died this past year. Colin Dextor ended the life of his character Inspector Morse about the same time--perhaps knowing the actor had cancer. The series always resonated with sadness and loss, but now the loss is real. Phelong Barrington's wonderful music beating out the no longer used Morse code adds to the angst.

The series was able to snare the best BBC actors and this episode is no exception. Mystery fans will recogize Kevin Whately as Lewis. Barbara Flynn, who played a private investigator in another Mystery presentation, plays a female don. Frederick Torres, who has been suspected of murder more than once and who fans of the "Jewel in the Crown" will know, also plays a don. Clive Swift, known to those who watch "Keeping up Appearances" as Richard Bucket (Bouquet) plays the head of the syndicate.

The DVD is a recording of the tape and is thus not top notch. This is the A&E version and A&E does not always do the best job. However, if you are a Morse fan, this is one of the best of the series, and unlike some of the later episodes was based on a book by Colin Dexter with the same title--so the plot is ingenious.

5-0 out of 5 stars Exquisite!
This has grown to be my favourite Inspector Morse of the entire Morse series! The more I watch this the more enchanted I become with it uncovering little pieces each time. Exquisite indeed!

The murder is set in the arcane world of examiantion boards which were affiliated to some of England's major universities as arbiters of the academic development of students at ages 16 and 18. This obscure branch of academia is nonetheless an ivory tower existance disguising basic human failings of jealousy, greed etc.

When a relatively new examiner is found dead at home the detectives seem to be looking beyond the workplace but in the course of the investigation the examination board becomes the centre of attention.

Essential Morse has three main interests, his love of opera, his appreciation of real ale (microbrews in American parlance), and his fascination of crosswords. It is in the last of these that we find the core to this story. As always the story is composed like a crossword such that the clues must be solved before completing the case. Here, however, the crossword assumes a much greater role. One of the other examiners, and as such a suspect, turns out to be an intellectual hero of Morse, Daedalus, who sets a particu;arly challenging crossword which gives Morse great pleasure. The two men share similar interests and it becomes apparent that they have a similar view of the world. They become competitors in trying to resolve the case but only until Daedalus (played superbly by Michael Gough) is also murdered although he leaves some difficult clues behind.

Another dimension to this story is the love interest of examiner Monica. Again there is a crossword perspective. Morse is intrigued by the physical and intellectual beauty of this woman, but as usual he cannot solve the clues to understanding her. He is torn between his feelings for her as a person and the growing suspicion that she is somehow involved in the murders. Ultimately this conflict is only resolved when it is too late.

The plot twists and turns and has several blind allies but it is compulsive viweing and by the device of Daedelus we get to see a mirror image of Morse the man. Kevin Whately puts in another superb performance as the long suffering Lewis who we perceive as the apprentice of the master but also the master's concience.

An excellent vintage and quite excellent indeed. ... Read more


15. Inspector Morse - Masonic Mysteries
Director: Danny Boyle, Stephen Whittaker, Sandy Johnson, Herbert Wise, Edward Bennett, Anthony Simmons, Charles Beeson, John Madden, Stuart Orme, Alastair Reid, Colin Gregg, Brian Parker, James Scott, Peter Hammond, Antonia Bird, Jack Gold, Jim Goddard, Adrian Shergold, Roy Battersby, Peter Duffell
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5-0 out of 5 stars Morse in misery
This is certainly a highly unusual entry in the series, given the fact that Morse is the chief suspect in a murder investigation. Morse is subjected to all sorts of trials and tribulations--- some of which are designed to create a trail of evidence framing Morse for more than one crime. One of the more amusing aspects of the mystery involves Morse's helplessness when confronted with computer technology and its bearing on the case. However, Sgt. Lewis, who never doubts Morse's innocence, comes to the rescue by utilizing his computer skills to help rescue Morse from his predicament. The role of Inspector Bottomley, who is assigned to investigate Morse, offers some amusement value as well. Bottomley, who belongs to a Masonic lodge, ends up looking rather foolish; moreover, he also seems to have been genuinely chagrined when Morse's innocence is finally established. In any event, this mystery represents an interesting and entertaining role reversal for Morse.

5-0 out of 5 stars When Life Imitates Art...
First thing to do is to ignore the "Part 1" above in the item title; you're getting the full-length (100 mins, approx.) episode of "Masonic Mysteries." In terms of the world of Inspector Morse, this is probably the Inspector Morse episode even people who wouldn't otherwise care for the series can enjoy (immensely, in most cases), as it's considerably different to any of the other 32 films in the series. Morse is "the hunted, instead of the hunter" for once, as he is being constantly framed (literally & figuratively) by someone whom he put away years ago and is trying to get his own back. The trials Morse is put through parallel the trials by fire & water in the Mozart opera, "The Magic Flute," which he is in rehearsals for at the beginning with his lady friend (played by Kevin Whately's real-life wife), who is subsequently found dead, before a dumbfounded Morse, knife-in-hand and covered in her blood. It's not based on a Colin Dexter novel and was written by Julian Mitchell, who has written/adapted more Morse screenplays than any other. Morse's close relationship with Lewis is manifested in this episode more than possibly any other. A great deal of humor is to be found in "Masonic Mysteries" (at the Masons' expense), especially from the brief exchanges between Chief Inspector Bottomley, who, working with Lewis, is put in charge of the case. Morse is uncharacteristically upbeat throughout most of the duration of the film, particularly especially given the circumstances he is put in. John Thaw regards this as among his three favorite Morse films (and cites its differing from the others as a factor in that), along with "The Dead of Jericho" ("for sentimental reasons") and "Promised Land". This is the first of two Morse films to be directed by Danny Boyle, the director of such cult hits as "Trainspotting" and "Shallow Grave". The incomparable Ian McDiarmid (who played "The Emperor" in the Star Wars films) stars as the evil-genius nemesis. The Inspector Morse series is widely regarded as the peak in televisual entertainment, and this is a prime example. ... Read more


16. Inspector Morse - Driven to Distraction
Director: Danny Boyle, Stephen Whittaker, Sandy Johnson, Herbert Wise, Edward Bennett, Anthony Simmons, Charles Beeson, John Madden, Stuart Orme, Alastair Reid, Colin Gregg, Brian Parker, James Scott, Peter Hammond, Antonia Bird, Jack Gold, Jim Goddard, Adrian Shergold, Roy Battersby, Peter Duffell
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5-0 out of 5 stars Driven to the Wrong Conclusion
Like a lot of the Inspector Morse films, a big clue to cracking the case is contained in the title. Including Morse and Lewis, there is a third person who plays an equally significant part in the investigations in this film: DS Maitland, an expert on crimes against women, of which this case is. She just happens to be one, too. This is perhaps the most straightforward storyline, with only a few twists and turns, one of which crops up at the very end, turning the investigation upside down, and also causing everything to fall into place and make sense. Morse is adamant he has his man from the very start and his contempt for the individual, not only an arrogant car salesman but a blackmailer and convicted wifebeater to boot, blinds his judgment. There are many red herrings in this case and the general rule in writing a "whodunit" - i.e. make the last person the viewer would expect to have done it, do it - is employed cunningly. Overall, this is another shining example of the classy series, brilliantly written by Academy Award Winner Anthony Minghella and directed by Sandy Johnson. It is not difficult to see why this is one of the Morse films Colin Dexter selected as his favorites. ... Read more


17. Inspector Morse - Greeks Bearing Gifts
Director: Danny Boyle, Stephen Whittaker, Sandy Johnson, Herbert Wise, Edward Bennett, Anthony Simmons, Charles Beeson, John Madden, Stuart Orme, Alastair Reid, Colin Gregg, Brian Parker, James Scott, Peter Hammond, Antonia Bird, Jack Gold, Jim Goddard, Adrian Shergold, Roy Battersby, Peter Duffell
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5-0 out of 5 stars As usual, John Thaw played His role as Morse brilliantly.
The story line is believeable,the acting is great, the city is beautiful. What more can I say? ... Read more


18. Inspector Morse - Infernal Serpent
Director: Danny Boyle, Stephen Whittaker, Sandy Johnson, Herbert Wise, Edward Bennett, Anthony Simmons, Charles Beeson, John Madden, Stuart Orme, Alastair Reid, Colin Gregg, Brian Parker, James Scott, Peter Hammond, Antonia Bird, Jack Gold, Jim Goddard, Adrian Shergold, Roy Battersby, Peter Duffell
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5-0 out of 5 stars perversion in high places
This story covers a multitude of sins, as it deals with sexual abuse of children, corporate greed, blackmail, and homosexuality among other things. The plot involves an intersection of issues related to possible environmental hazards, corporate efforts to suppress information regarding those hazards, and the attempts of those who have been victimized by sexual abuse to take revenge against the perpetrator. All these issues surface only after Morse investigates the death of a professor, a death which
ironically is attributed to natural causes (a heart attack). Morse once more demonstrates the "thinking man" approach to detection, reaching conclusions based upon analysis of clues (childhood photographs) which might be overlooked by less sagacious investigators. The performances are first rate, and the manner in which the story unfolds maintains interest throughout. ... Read more


19. Inspector Morse - The Way Through the Woods
Director: Danny Boyle, Stephen Whittaker, Sandy Johnson, Herbert Wise, Edward Bennett, Anthony Simmons, Charles Beeson, John Madden, Stuart Orme, Alastair Reid, Colin Gregg, Brian Parker, James Scott, Peter Hammond, Antonia Bird, Jack Gold, Jim Goddard, Adrian Shergold, Roy Battersby, Peter Duffell
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5-0 out of 5 stars The Best of the Bunch
The very best Morse ever. The riddle: why do you hide a body so carefully that no one can ever find it, and then leave the victim's bookbag carelessly along the side of the road?

5-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful !!!
I am lucky in that I used to live in Oxford, so when I watch Morse I know exactly where He is but the filming of this took place mostly in Whytham Woods, a place very near to where I lived but only visited once. I also am aquainted with the real people the main roles were based on. I got so sucked into the plot that I half belived it was the real people I know that were the villians!! For me this film is a " must see" but then all morse films in my view are "to die for"! ... Read more


20. Inspector Morse - Who Killed Harry Field?
Director: Danny Boyle, Stephen Whittaker, Sandy Johnson, Herbert Wise, Edward Bennett, Anthony Simmons, Charles Beeson, John Madden, Stuart Orme, Alastair Reid, Colin Gregg, Brian Parker, James Scott, Peter Hammond, Antonia Bird, Jack Gold, Jim Goddard, Adrian Shergold, Roy Battersby, Peter Duffell
list price: $19.98
our price: $17.98
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00008AORO
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 10131
Average Customer Review: 4 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (1)

4-0 out of 5 stars Typical excellence - and one extra feature
A painter dies mysteriously, and various interests including his father, his erstwhile model and a mysterious rich man all seem to have something to do with it. Typically excellent fare from the Morse team, with the great John Thaw (a national resource, and his death from cancer was a dreadful loss) in typically grumpy and expressive form as Morse, and gorgeous, sunlit English landscapes - in Morse's England it practically never rains (not that I mind). But I hope you don't mind my saying that it is something else that makes this one episode absolutely unforgettable for me: the mysterious model - a single mother living a life of squalor in one of Morse's few genuine slum dwellings - is Nicola Cowper, a little-known English actress who is probably the most beautiful thing I have ever seen in my life. She simply burns on the screen like a flame. One does not wonder that one character is troubled by her almost to his death, and that another is willing to pay for her favours. But even if you do not share my taste for small, exquisite, intense women, you will still not regret buying this episode. ... Read more


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