Global Shopping Center
UK | Germany
Home - DVD - Directors - ( B ) - Brown, Clarence Help

1-8 of 8       1

click price to see details     click image to enlarge     click link to go to the store

$6.99 $5.43 list($9.97)
1. National Velvet
$10.38 $6.89 list($12.98)
2. The Yearling
$8.04 list($24.98)
3. National Velvet
$22.49 $18.74 list($24.99)
4. The Eagle
$48.99 list($14.99)
5. The Last of the Mohicans
$32.38 $28.71 list($35.98)
6. New York Minute / When In Rome
7. Anna Karenina
$19.96
8. National Velvet/Black Beauty

1. National Velvet
Director: Clarence Brown
list price: $9.97
our price: $6.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00004RFHN
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 867
Average Customer Review: 4.39 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Description

Enchantingly beautiful Elizabeth Taylor became a movie star at age twelve after starring in this classic about a girl and her jockey pal (Mickey Rooney) who transform an unruly horse into a champion. ... Read more

Reviews (23)

5-0 out of 5 stars A Classic Tale of a Girl, her Horse, a young Jockey and Mom
Somehow I never got around to see this movie until I was 40 years old. I guess it was because I was never really an Elizabeth Taylor fan, although I have always enjoyed "The Taming of the Shrew" and "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" But I was at the library and I had always heard good things about it and so I checked in out and took it home and watched it and feel in love with it.

The plot line involving Mike (Mickey Rooney) starts off as somewhat melodramatic, the standard story (literarly in this case) of the guy who has to get back on the horse. The twist is that when he does our young heroine has decided she is the only one who can ride the Pie to victory. The twist is the Rooney achieves his victory without winning (anticipating "Rocky" in that regard when you stop and think about it).

The focus of the film is on Taylor and Rooney, but the heart and soul of the film is the relationship between Velvet and her mother. Anne Reeve won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for her portrayal of the mother, and while her scenes with husband Donald Crip are small gems scattered throughout the film (they call each other "Mr. Brown" and "Mrs. Brown" and you can tell how much they love each other every time they do it), it is the scenes with her daughter that bring home the film.

Mrs. Brown uses the money from her swimming the channel to fund Velvet's dream of racing the pie in the Grand National. But for Velvet the payoff is not when she wins the race and becames a front page story, but when she arrives home and immediately runs to her mother and says, "We won, Mother. We won." Her mother already knows. All of England knows. But all that mattered was telling her mother. It is a neat scene and an ellegant payoff to the film, more so than her running off to fetch make Mike.

This 1944 film was directed by Clarence Brown and is based on the novel by Enid Bagnold. Final Warning: And if after you have watched and enjoyed this classic film with your children and you screen the sequel "International Velvet" which only leaves a bad taste in your mouth, you have only yourself to blame.

5-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful Technicolor Film About a Girl's Dream
I love both the book of NATIONAL VELVET and this film, which makes small changes to the book, but the theme and joy remain the same. Sickly Velvet Brown wins a fractious horse in a lottery and she and ex-jockey Mi Taylor train the horse to race in England's most famous steeplechase, the Grand National, a grueling race with frightening jumps. Velvet's family--her wise mother, excitable father, lovelorn older sister, telltale other sister, and mischievous little brother are all entertaining in their own right--some of the best scenes in the movie are between Anne Revere as Mrs. Brown and Donald Crisp as Mr. Brown. All this in glorious Technicolor recreating an English village of the 1920s. A must-have. Read the book as well--there is another sister in the story, more horse incidents, and it's not "translated" for American sensibilities like Harry Potter, so you get a real feel for English life and dialect at the time.

2-0 out of 5 stars Poor treatment of a classic
"National Velvet" is a wonderful movie, for all ages. Frankly, I'd consider it one of the best "sports" movies ever made.

Sadly, Warner Brothers DVD release leaves a lot to be desired. The picture frequently goes out of focus, and the disc is bare-bones....not even the trailer [promised on the DVD jacket] is included.

With Elizabeth Taylor and Mickey Rooney still around, you would have thought they'd have either interviewed them, or gotten a commentary track from them for this classic. It would be worth the price to get a "special edition" release.

Until then, I guess we're stuck with this sorry disk.

5-0 out of 5 stars Not to be missed
Clarence Brown was one of those accomplished American directors who never seemed to get the credit he deserved. This project is certainly his masterpiece. It's usually hyped as a children's picture but it works at all age levels: the apotheosis of the "family" movie. Mickey Rooney delivers the best performance of his amazing career; he should be next on the "lifetime achievment" list of the American movie academy. Brown also extracted equally compelling performances from Elizabeth Taylor, Donald Crisp and Anne Revere; in fact the entire cast. Taylor is a young English girl transported by her love of hayburners and her pure happiness is the central theme of the movie, a subject you don't see treated much anymore. Highly recommended.

5-0 out of 5 stars Horse Crazy!
National Velvet is a sweet, inspiring film that will forever be a wonderful classic. Elizabeth Taylor (Velvet Brown) and Mickey Rooney (Mi Taylor) did an incredible job portraying their characters. Elizabeth Taylor only twelve years old, plays the part of a horse crazy little girl who is bound and determined that her horse (Pie) can when the Grand National Steeplechase. Although Pie was not originally her horse, it was enduring to watch how Velvet acquired the 16 hands, 6 foot jumping horse and how small of chance she had to win him. Mickey Rooney played a wonderful role of a frighten ex-jockey who in the beginning did not want any part of the horse business after an accident early in his career. With a spirited young girl, a wonderful horse that was thought to be no good, and an ex-jockey that tried too hard to stay away from horses, a winning story was sure to be produced. Velvet's family also played an important role as her mother (Academy Award winner Anne Revere), the quick tongue lady who could always convince her husband otherwise and Velvet's siblings, that put an emphasis on typical sibling relationships. For it's time, when this film was produced, it was outstanding (Academy Award winning) and now it is even more outstanding. People of all ages can enjoy this film because it's heartwarming with a touch of comedy that seeps into the heart of everyone. ... Read more


2. The Yearling
Director: Clarence Brown
list price: $12.98
our price: $10.38
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B000069I1J
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 3869
Average Customer Review: 4.22 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Description

Life abounds in the 1870s Florida scrubland that's home to young Jody Baxter. There are bears to hunt, cash crops to plant, evenings of storytelling with Pa and Ma... and there are timeless lessons of love and letting go that Jody learns from Flag, the orphaned pet fawn that follows him around with devotion. ... Read more

Reviews (18)

5-0 out of 5 stars Director Clarence Brown's best movie.
"The Yearling" is a 1946 family classic with Gregory Peck, Jane Wyman, and Claude Jarman, Jr. It's also a movie that has grown on me each time I have watched it. Of all of director Clarence Brown's films, including "National Velvet", "The Yearling" has the most chock-full of enjoyable and memorable scenes. Even though the story is centered around Jody (Jarman, Jr.) and his pet fawn Flag, for me it's more about Jody and his father Penny Baxter (Peck). Their relationship is the best father-son relationship I've seen in a film. Gregory Peck can play fathers in movies better than most actors because his characters always listen to their children. Claude Jarman, Jr. received a special Academy Award for this film, and deserved it. During the last half of this movie, I was so amazed by how well he could cry. His performance ranks among the very best performances from child actors in movies. The ending both breaks my heart and fills me with hope, when the father tells Jody about life and when the mother (Wyman) finally opens up her love to Jody. This is what quality family entertainment used to be, and I love it.

5-0 out of 5 stars A Timeless Classic That Must Be Seen
This wonderful film is one of a handful that has the power to call me back to my childhood days and wrap me in warm memories of my Mom, Dad and little brother sitting around the television on Saturday night, watching the late show.

From the opening scenes of this beautifully photographed movie I found myself caught-up in the intriguing post Civil War story of a boy and his pet faun and their fantastic adventures on a scruffy Florida Everglades farm. The film stars Gregory Peck, Jane Wyman and Claude Jarman in the lead roles, with some of Hollywood's best character actors in the colorful supporting roles.

Peck gives an Oscar caliber performance as the warmhearted father who tries his best to make a better life for his family, with absolutely no help from the elements, which surround them. Jane Wyman plays his wife Orry, the hardened mother and wife who is so embittered by past tragedies in her life that she refuses to show any love for her one remaining child for fear of losing him too. And Claude Jarman plays Jodie the wistful young son who is just one summer away from adolescence and all the hardships that come with growing up.

This story is chock-full of excitement and adventure sure to please the kids, and each of those adventures is also a great lesson on life that will stay with them for years to come. Just watching Jodie romp with his pet faun for that one fleeting summer is a joyous site to behold and the touching scenes where Orry finally begins letting herself love her son will bring tears to your eyes. And of course the heart-rending scenes of Jodie trying his best to get the yearling to run away so he won't have destroy it, all come together to make this movie one of the most emotional experiences of my childhood and I must say I believe I'm a better person for the values I learned from this timeless story.

Experience this film with your children, you won't be sorry you did.

1-0 out of 5 stars Wretched
They feed a deer for a year and then kill it for eating their food after killing its mother and at first pontificating about taking responsibility for their actions. They blame bears and deer for "misbehaving" by eating while they take no responsibility to use adequate locks and fences or even learn to shoot instead of twice maiming animals and letting them linger.

5-0 out of 5 stars Amazing, touching, wonderful
Tonight, for the first time on PBS, I had a chance to see this wonderful movie. At 45, I have never seen it and am overjoyed to finally have the chance. I am in love with the young Gregory Peck, am astonished over Claude, and Jane reminds me too much of my own mother lol. The fawn must have bonded to Claude as he seems to really be attached to him. I want now to find out more about this wonderful young actor and about the fawn! How I never saw this movie all my life I will never know. This must be shown to children in school. I am touched beyond words, it is beautifully shot and enriching. Marjorie Rawlings deservedly won the Pulitzer and now I must read the book. I am laughing out loud, teary eyed and heart warmed at the same time. What a wonderful, wonderful movie.

5-0 out of 5 stars Beautiful movie
I saw this movie when I was a child, and just recently watched it again. And again! I think it is one of the best movies ever made. The most touching scenes are when Jody first rescues the little fawn, and the scenes with Fodderwing. The Forrester Family is hilarious (when Pa swaps the dog for the rifle). The opening scene with Peck narrating is excellent. The scenery throughout the film is beautiful, and Claude Jarman Jr. is an absolute delight. It is definitely one of America's finest films! ... Read more


3. National Velvet
Director: Clarence Brown
list price: $24.98
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0792836960
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 24610
Average Customer Review: 4.39 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Amazon.com

This classic family film made a star of 12-year-old Elizabeth Taylor in the title role as spunky Velvet Brown, a girl who's determined to enter her horse, Pie, in the Grand National Steeplechase. Critic Pauline Kael called it "One of the most likeable movies of all time." Mickey Rooney costars as a young man who helps Velvet train Pie for the big race. At the last minute, Velvet herself has to ride Pie in the tournament and cuts her hair to pass for a jockey. Anne Revere won an Oscar as Velvet's mother, as did editor Robert J. Kern, who cut together a terrifically exciting horse race. Donald Crisp and Angela Lansbury are also featured as members of the Brown family.--Jim Emerson ... Read more

Reviews (23)

5-0 out of 5 stars A Classic Tale of a Girl, her Horse, a young Jockey and Mom
Somehow I never got around to see this movie until I was 40 years old. I guess it was because I was never really an Elizabeth Taylor fan, although I have always enjoyed "The Taming of the Shrew" and "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" But I was at the library and I had always heard good things about it and so I checked in out and took it home and watched it and feel in love with it.

The plot line involving Mike (Mickey Rooney) starts off as somewhat melodramatic, the standard story (literarly in this case) of the guy who has to get back on the horse. The twist is that when he does our young heroine has decided she is the only one who can ride the Pie to victory. The twist is the Rooney achieves his victory without winning (anticipating "Rocky" in that regard when you stop and think about it).

The focus of the film is on Taylor and Rooney, but the heart and soul of the film is the relationship between Velvet and her mother. Anne Reeve won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for her portrayal of the mother, and while her scenes with husband Donald Crip are small gems scattered throughout the film (they call each other "Mr. Brown" and "Mrs. Brown" and you can tell how much they love each other every time they do it), it is the scenes with her daughter that bring home the film.

Mrs. Brown uses the money from her swimming the channel to fund Velvet's dream of racing the pie in the Grand National. But for Velvet the payoff is not when she wins the race and becames a front page story, but when she arrives home and immediately runs to her mother and says, "We won, Mother. We won." Her mother already knows. All of England knows. But all that mattered was telling her mother. It is a neat scene and an ellegant payoff to the film, more so than her running off to fetch make Mike.

This 1944 film was directed by Clarence Brown and is based on the novel by Enid Bagnold. Final Warning: And if after you have watched and enjoyed this classic film with your children and you screen the sequel "International Velvet" which only leaves a bad taste in your mouth, you have only yourself to blame.

5-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful Technicolor Film About a Girl's Dream
I love both the book of NATIONAL VELVET and this film, which makes small changes to the book, but the theme and joy remain the same. Sickly Velvet Brown wins a fractious horse in a lottery and she and ex-jockey Mi Taylor train the horse to race in England's most famous steeplechase, the Grand National, a grueling race with frightening jumps. Velvet's family--her wise mother, excitable father, lovelorn older sister, telltale other sister, and mischievous little brother are all entertaining in their own right--some of the best scenes in the movie are between Anne Revere as Mrs. Brown and Donald Crisp as Mr. Brown. All this in glorious Technicolor recreating an English village of the 1920s. A must-have. Read the book as well--there is another sister in the story, more horse incidents, and it's not "translated" for American sensibilities like Harry Potter, so you get a real feel for English life and dialect at the time.

2-0 out of 5 stars Poor treatment of a classic
"National Velvet" is a wonderful movie, for all ages. Frankly, I'd consider it one of the best "sports" movies ever made.

Sadly, Warner Brothers DVD release leaves a lot to be desired. The picture frequently goes out of focus, and the disc is bare-bones....not even the trailer [promised on the DVD jacket] is included.

With Elizabeth Taylor and Mickey Rooney still around, you would have thought they'd have either interviewed them, or gotten a commentary track from them for this classic. It would be worth the price to get a "special edition" release.

Until then, I guess we're stuck with this sorry disk.

5-0 out of 5 stars Not to be missed
Clarence Brown was one of those accomplished American directors who never seemed to get the credit he deserved. This project is certainly his masterpiece. It's usually hyped as a children's picture but it works at all age levels: the apotheosis of the "family" movie. Mickey Rooney delivers the best performance of his amazing career; he should be next on the "lifetime achievment" list of the American movie academy. Brown also extracted equally compelling performances from Elizabeth Taylor, Donald Crisp and Anne Revere; in fact the entire cast. Taylor is a young English girl transported by her love of hayburners and her pure happiness is the central theme of the movie, a subject you don't see treated much anymore. Highly recommended.

5-0 out of 5 stars Horse Crazy!
National Velvet is a sweet, inspiring film that will forever be a wonderful classic. Elizabeth Taylor (Velvet Brown) and Mickey Rooney (Mi Taylor) did an incredible job portraying their characters. Elizabeth Taylor only twelve years old, plays the part of a horse crazy little girl who is bound and determined that her horse (Pie) can when the Grand National Steeplechase. Although Pie was not originally her horse, it was enduring to watch how Velvet acquired the 16 hands, 6 foot jumping horse and how small of chance she had to win him. Mickey Rooney played a wonderful role of a frighten ex-jockey who in the beginning did not want any part of the horse business after an accident early in his career. With a spirited young girl, a wonderful horse that was thought to be no good, and an ex-jockey that tried too hard to stay away from horses, a winning story was sure to be produced. Velvet's family also played an important role as her mother (Academy Award winner Anne Revere), the quick tongue lady who could always convince her husband otherwise and Velvet's siblings, that put an emphasis on typical sibling relationships. For it's time, when this film was produced, it was outstanding (Academy Award winning) and now it is even more outstanding. People of all ages can enjoy this film because it's heartwarming with a touch of comedy that seeps into the heart of everyone. ... Read more


4. The Eagle
Director: Clarence Brown
list price: $24.99
our price: $22.49
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00006674H
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 37370
Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Description

Set in the Imperial Court of 18th-century Russia, "The Eagle" is a dashing and romantic adventure in which Rudolph Valentino gives what many consider to be his finest screen performance. Here is a role tailor-made for the legendary Valentino--that of Vladimir, the handsome young Cossack guardsman who is banished after rejecting the amorous advances of Catherine the Great (stunningly portrayed by Louise Dresser) and becomes the "Black Eagle," a Russian Robin Hood dedicated to robbing the rich and giving to the down-trodden peasants. ... Read more

Reviews (10)

4-0 out of 5 stars Great Movie, So-So DVD
This is my favorite Valentino movie. It allows him to use his natural talent as a comedian while still fulfilling what his audience expected of his as "the great lover".
Valentino plays Vladimir, a young Cossack officer who spurns the advances of Catherine the Great. (An amusing reversal especially when viewed along with the Sheik movies) Unfortunately, Vladimir's father wirtes to him begging him to get the Czarina's help. He has been swindled by a friend and is dying. Vladimir can do nothing but go home and watch his father die a broken man. He vows vengeance against Karilla, who betrayed his father, and becomes a sort of Russian Zorro called the Black Eagle.
Another unfortunate twist, Karilla has a daughter and since she is played by the lovely Vilma Banky you can guess what happens. Vladimir is smitten and is now stuck between loyalty to his father and band of followers and his love for her. Banky guesses who Vladimir really is right away (in spite of his disguises) and tries to get him to spare her father. Of course, Vladimir will have none of it and it looks like trouble until Vladimir is caught by the soldiers of the revengeful Catherine.
What happens next? Watch and see!

Valentino handles his swashbuckler duties with an airy charm. (A shame he never played the Scarlet Pimpernel!) His scenes with Louise Dresser's Catherine are particularly good. She is trying to charm him, he is trying to find a polite way out. Dresser thoroughly deserved her Oscar nod and it's too bad that Valentino was not given one as well. The rest of the supporting cast is also very good, Vilma Banky plays her usual role, the nice girl with a temper, and has an obvious chemistry with Valentino.

That said, this DVD, while ok, is not the greatest. The print quality is so-so and points. Bit of dust and lint got in the way of the transfer and can be distracting. The score is pipe organ. There are no extras besides scene selection. All in all, not an improvement on the VHS releases but you may as well buy it if you have an all DVD collection.

Check out this movie to watch the Valentino legend yourself but don't expect too much from the DVD.

5-0 out of 5 stars A breezy silent romp
This movie is a light action/romance/comedy which manages to balance all of the elements well. If you have never seen a silent movie, this is a marvelous place to start.

Valentino's preformance is charming as a "nice kid" who, after his father's death, becomes an outlaw. Matters are complicated by the fact that he has rebuffed the advances of Czarina Catherine the Great earlier in the movie. Matters become more complicated when he falls in love with his enemies sweet daughter. Matters become complicated still more when he takes a post as her French tutor in order to exact hsi revenge on her father.

While all of the comedy is excellent, the throw away bits are the best such as when Valentino is about to give Vilma Banky a ring but then it gets stuck on his finger or when he adds a few zeros to the reward offered for his capture on a wanted poster.

Wonderful, would recommend to anyone interested in classics and silent cinema.

2-0 out of 5 stars Could We Have The Old Version, Please?
If you don't have a copy of Valentino's most engaging silent, "The Eagle", in your collection, you should certainly have this, but you should know that it is far - very far - from the best version that has been available. This edition is sourced from the Killiam Collection, and is evidently from a 16mm reduction print that saw long use and little care. Contrast and detail are poor, to say the least. There is a sad, tired musical accompaniment that is best turned off, frankly.

What's awful about all this is that this same company, Image Entertainment, once offered a far superior version. Its 1989 laserdisc edition was based on a clean 35mm print from the Rohauer Collection that had excellent contrast and detail. The score was a magnificently well-suited one by Carl Davis; it went so well with the film that once you've had a viewing with Davis's compositions, seeing "The Eagle" with any other score is unthinkable.

"The Eagle" is indispensable to a collection of silents, but this edition is not a patch on what Image itself has offered in the past. It is to be hoped that the company can clear whatever obstacles are keeping it from offering a DVD release of what was one of the best silent-film offerings on laserdisc.

Two stars out of five- I'm docking two for the ghastly print, two for the wretched score that takes the place of Davis's work, and adding one back to be charitable, because this movie is one of Valentino's best, and you should have it, even in a version as shabby as this.

2-0 out of 5 stars Good Movie - Poor transfer
This is not a review of the movie - other than to say it has been one of my favorite silents for over 20 years. This DVD, by Image from the Killiam Collection, seems to be from a somewhat deteriorated positive print of the movie accompanied by a rather mundane organ music tract. Image themselves, released a Laserdisc copy from the Rohauer Collection with full orchestra music in 1989 that was far superior. Hopefully they will be able to re-master that on for release on DVD in the future.

3-0 out of 5 stars "The Eagle" on DVD -- wonderful film but poor print
"The Eagle" is probably silent screen star Rudolph Valentino's best film. A delightful romantic swashbuckler set in the 18th century Russia (although costume-wise it looks 19th and early 20th century), it is full of action, romance, and also plenty of humor. Valentino is a lieutenant in the czarina's army who becomes a sort of Russian Zorro in order to avenge his father's murder by a neighboring landowner who had stolen his land. His plans for revenge go awry when he falls in love with the charming and lovely daughter of his enemy played by Vilma Banky, who would be reteamed with Valentino in his final film, "The Son of the Sheik." "The Eagle" was directed by Clarence Brown who went on to direct Greta Garbo, and made a number of classic sound films including "National Velvet."

"The Eagle" as a film deserves 5 stars but I can only give this new DVD print 3 stars. Unfortunately, the poor picture quality of this DVD is from the Killiam Collection and is released by Image Entertainment. It has an organ score which I found to be so-so.

...The only real plus here with this DVD is there are chapter titles so you can jump to your favorite scenes. There are no other extras here. ... Read more


5. The Last of the Mohicans
Director: Clarence Brown, Maurice Tourneur
list price: $14.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00003ETJU
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 33617
Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Reviews (5)

5-0 out of 5 stars Hard to believe this was made so long agol
I have to honestly say that I did not even know there was a silent version of this film. I actually ordered it because I like the story and thought it would be interesting to see a silent version. Viewing this version was- breathtaking to say the least. The video transfer of this film is remarkably good which helps but more importantly the story itself and the acting I found incredibly interesting. Unlike the Dnaiel Day-Lewis version, which is excellent in its own right- this version has Hawkeye as a Minor Character. It focuses on the affection between Uncus (one of the 2 last of the Mohicans) and the General's Dauhter Cora (played by Madeline Stowe in the modern version). It must have been somewhat unsettling back in 1920 to even hint at a relationship between a Native American man and a Caucasian woman. This movie only hints at this relationship but I found it to be very believable and a refreshing point of view tastefully done. Another major plus of this movie was the actress who played Cora. If you view this movie it will be difficult to not think about this woman. I've seldom seen an actress or an actor emote so much simply by facial expression. Wallace Beery portrays Magua, the "bad" guy, menacingly well and, early in the film, you can see a very young Boris Karloff as an Indian raider. If you enjoy the story of Last of the Mohicans and if you have had the pleasure of seeing any silent film masterpiece you will thoroughly enjoy this DVD.

4-0 out of 5 stars Not the experience it could have been...
An excellent film with outstanding print quality but the whole experience of watching it was spoilt for me by a very poor musical score and sub titles that are simply text on a black screen.
Atmosphere is so important when watching a silent film -- you have to be totally immersed in all the aspects that constitute the whole. Having a totally inappropriate and monotonous synth score and sub titles that have no charm whatsoever,kept jarring me back to the present and as a result I could not appreciate the film as it deserved to be. A solo piano would have been preferable if a cost was a consideration and there is no excuse for not using, or at least reproducing, the original titles.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Best of the Mohicans
Last of the Mohicans is a very fine silent adaptation of James Fenimore Cooper's Classic novel. The film distils a long novel into its fairly short running time, but remains faithful to the essence of Cooper's story. The main change is that the role of Hawkeye is relegated to one of secondary importance. The emphasis of the film is on the romance between Uncas and Cora Munro and the scheming of the evil Magua to have Cora for himself.

The performances in the film are naturalistic and full of feeling. Wallace Beery as Magua makes a fine villain, while Barbara Bedford is a stunning Cora, brave, beautiful and feisty. But what makes this film work so well is the use of location, the glorious scenery and the thrilling action. Some of this action is surprisingly violent, especially an attack by drunken Hurons on a group of refugees. This attack includes a shocking scene of an infant torn from her mother's arms and thrown skyward to its death. Although the Hurons are shown in a poor light, the film on the whole, as is the case with Cooper's novel, is sympathetic towards the Native American characters. Uncas is portrayed as a far superior man to Cora's original British suitor. Her being attracted to Uncas is shown to be natural and indeed commonplace. This must have seemed a daring approach for a film made in 1920, a time when interracial romance was considered taboo.

This is a very well produced DVD. The print quality is first class with almost no apparent damage. The colour-tinted images are sharp and clear and some of the scenes are dazzling in their beauty. The film is accompanied by a score which fits in well with the action and adds to the mood of the whole viewing experience.

4-0 out of 5 stars WONDERFUL PICTURE but...
This is truly one of the best silent dramas - beautifully performed and filmed. If you are a silent film purist, the Slingshot DVD will surely cause the hair on your neck to stand up. The score is excellent, but of a modern style and totally out of character. The titles (even the opening credits) have all been replaced by a modern style. The original film portion would rate 5 stars, but the slash and burn reconstruction detracts. If Image Entertainment ever puts this out, go for it instead.

5-0 out of 5 stars A masterpiece.
The 1920 version of THE LAST OF THE MOHICANS is far and away the best screen version of this oft-filmed tale. In it's restored and tinted version it is a visual masterpiece, containing some of the most breathtaking scenic photography in movie history. What makes it truly great however is the fact that even after eighty years it refuses to be a "dated" antique. Far more emotionally complex than any of the other adaptions, particularly the Michael Mann version of the nineties, and much less sentimental. The drama can still grab a viewer by the throat and refuse to let go. Highlights include the Massacre of the british fort as well as the finale set atop a huge cliff that is as tragic as it is thrilling. The acting is uniformly excellent, even Beery as Indian villain of the piece. The direction by Tourneur and Brown is stunning. I dream of seeing this film on a full size screen at a cinema with an orchestral accompaniment. ... Read more


6. New York Minute / When In Rome (2-Pack)
Director: Clarence Brown
list price: $35.98
our price: $32.38
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0002HT55C
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 14884
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

7. Anna Karenina
Director: Clarence Brown

Asin: B00005JLIZ
Catlog: DVD
Average Customer Review: 4.11 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Reviews (9)

2-0 out of 5 stars Oh, could have used more Basil!
I'm extremely partial to Basil Rathbone, who played Anna's husband Karenin in this 1935 movie. Now, we're all familiar with Basil's villains, like Sir Guy in "Robin Hood" or his indestructible hero Sherlock Holmes. This time he was trying something different for a while: he actually was conveying nervousness when his character had to take his wife to task for her improprieties. Very unlike Basil, and I was surprised and delighted to see it. However, his character quickly had to become A Mean Vengeful Husband in order to make Garbo's Anna look good, and that was a bore.

Which brings me round to my general opinion of "Anna Karenina", notwithstanding BR. I found this an unsatisfactory representation of Tolstoy's novel because the characterization of Anna is all wrong. Garbo is much too confident, too together to make this story work. Anna is a formerly above reproach wife of a bureaucrat. Finally, she attracts some attention from a dashing army officer and then she falls from grace. I guess no one had tried to seduce her before; she is not in love with her husband. But though she chooses to pursue her illicit affair with Count Vronsky the officer, she cannot withstand society's rejection of her. It's not just "oh, she saw him talking gaily to a blonde"--it's the whole of Russian society that turns its back on her for her sin. So, she starts to lose her grip mentally which is why she takes A Drastic Step at the story's end. Greta Garbo didn't seem all that interested in Fredric March's Vronsky, at least not so much to follow him to Venice. I also didn't think she interacted effectively with her husband in their early domestic scenes, either. Here, she was the one giving him the cold shoulder and he looked alienated. I would more certainly have believed he would be the one to look for consolation from Vronsky! Or at least somebody.

Of course, with such a short running time, the Levin/Kitty subplot went nowhere. That's also too bad, because Maureen O'Sullivan's Kitty was cutting a good figure as the jilted somewhat jealous Kitty at the ball. Although a lot of reviewers really slam Fred March, he's okay, especially when he becomes increasingly exasperated with all the doggone togetherness his affair with Anna has brought him.

Bottom line: Garbo not cast correctly. Lengthier treatment would have allowed for more deserved depth of character for both Basil and Maureen.

5-0 out of 5 stars Greta Garbo in one of her greatest roles
The classic 1935 adaptation of Leo Tolstoy's tragic masterpiece is still a joy to behold. Greta Garbo is breathtakingly-lovely in one of her greatest screen performances.

Anna Karenina (Greta Garbo) lives a life of dull monotony, broken only by the presence of her engaging son Sergei (Freddie Bartholomew). Her cold husband Karenin (Basil Rathbone) treats her more like a trophy than a wife, and she relishes her carefree visits to her relatives.

When Anna falls in love with the dashing - and younger - Captain Vronsky (Fredric March) she gives way to a great passion...and even greater tragedy.

This was in fact a remake of the hugely-successful silent film LOVE, again starring Greta Garbo with her frequent leading-man (and lover) John Gilbert. Both versions are splendid, but this version stays more faithful to Tolstoy's novel.

Also starring Maureen O'Sullivan, May Robson and Reginald Owen.

3-0 out of 5 stars Garbo Salvages It
Greta Garbo stars in this adaptation of Tolstoy's famous novel as the title character, a woman whose loveless marriage leads her into the arms of another man ... and then to tragedy. Garbo, always fascinating to watch, is very strong in the role of a woman torn between her love for an officer and sacrificing her child. Fredric March, as the officer she loves, does not register as strongly. It's difficult to see the attraction he holds for Garbo. Basil Rathbone, playing Garbo's rigid husband, is appropriately cold, while the rest of the cast walks through their roles without much notice. All in all, the film failed to engage me to any great degree. The screenplay is stiffly written, with little time given to showing how the lovers' relationship developed, and several wooden moments of dialogue that fall flat. Were it not for the presence of Garbo, I don't think there would be much to recommend in it. From the great moment at the beginning where her face first emerges from the smoke by the train, she gives the film whatever magic it has.

5-0 out of 5 stars Triumphant
It is appropriate that one of literature's greatest and most tragic figures, Tolstoy's Anna Karenina, is given compelling life on screen by one of fildom's most gifted and spellbinding artists, Greta Garbo, in MGM's luxurious production of Tolstoy's masterpiece, "Anna Karenina".

Anna is the neglected wife of Russian aristocrat/bureaucrat, Karenin, haughtily portrayed by Basil Rathbone. Karenin is consumed by his career and social standing. It seems that the only reason he married Anna and had a son with her is to enhance his "respectibility" in society.

When a handsome officer, Count Vronsky, played with conviction by Frederic March, understandably is infatuated by the astonishingly beautiful and charming Anna, he makes this known to her. He is persistent in his pursuit of her.

At first Anna is reticent to his charms, but eventually succumbs. This story takes place during the 1800's under the reign of Czar Nicholas I of Russia. In this era, there was a strict and judgmental social code. Adultery was treated like a crime or a contagious disease, and Anna finds herself the object of scorn and ridicule among society.

Anna's husband Karenin refuses to grant Anna a divorce and tells their son that Anna is dead when she flees to Venice with Vronsky. Eventually Anna becomes a social outcast because of her affair, and Vronsky begins to suffocate from their relationship. He decides to go off to war rather than be with Anna constantly.

Devasted by Vronsky's abandonment and shunned by society, Anna's fate is tragic.

I can imagine few other actresses than Greta Garbo who could so realistically embody the character of Anna. Anna is essentially a good person, a loving mother, and dutiful wife. But she is starved for tenderness and affection so she turns to Vronsky. Garbo subtly conveys Anna's despair and loneliness in her loveless marriage to Karenin. Garbo makes you empathize with her predicament, and you truly feel the joy, passion, and guilt that Anna experiences as she falls in love with Vronsky.

As an actress, Garbo is a minimalist in the best sense. She understands that less is more. She can gladden or break your heart with a glance, a smile, or the slightest tilt of her posture. Her eyes are wondrously expressive. This is a masterful, mature, and dignified performance by a consummate actress.

As for the rest of the movie, the direction, sets, and photography are all impressive. And Garbo's unearthly beauty is complemented by the ravishing costumes designed by Adrian. This version of "Anna Karenina" is a triumph.

3-0 out of 5 stars I Like Fredric March, but I didn't like him in this film...
....because he plays a cad and I just can't take seeing Fred playing a cad! I was glad to read in his bio that he himself didn't want to do this part, feeling it wasn't really the best for him. But he had to do it...Really, he is much better as the romantic GOOD guy, not the sort of romantic, selfish BAD guy.

I will start first with what I liked about this film. First of all, Fredric March. This man rarely fails to impress me as an actor. He was just such a wonderful guy too...so handsome and romantic. In this, he looks terrific in the military uniforms, has a GREAT haircut and a cute little mustache. Once again he has a drunk scene, which is very unique. All these Russian soldiers drinking shots in unison and with the precision as if they are doing drills on the parade field. And then they must crawl under the table, come back to their place, and then the commander shouts orders to prepare for the next drink...truly weird!! Also, the opening shot of the LONG LONG table of food was very impressive. I liked Basil Rathbone because he did a great job of being the strange husband of Anna's. I liked the relationship Anna had with her young son. I liked seeing Fred doing the Russian dance at the party.

What I didn't like. As mentioned before, seeing Fred as a cad. I didn't like his selfishness. I don't like Greta Garbo much, and while she did okay in this film, she just seemed so tragic in spirit all the time, like she never really was happy, but was in a trap of an unhappy marriage, yet her affair with Vronsky was not any happier. It didn't seem like they really liked each other; I didn't feel any passion between them; it was very strange how the whole love affair was handled in the film, but then I read that the Code had a lot to do with that. I don't approve of affairs; and I couldn't respect Anna as a person because her values were wrong. She gave up her son for a fling with another man. A mother who truly loves her children will never go and seek something for herself at the expense of her children.

The whole film was generally dark and meloncholy, sad and tragic. You could be happy for neither Anna or Vronsky. You sit at the end of the movie only feeling sad for their tragedy. It is not a "happy" watch.

But I did like to gaze upon a handsome Fredric March! If you want to see Fredric as a Russian soldier again...see him in We Live Again. He is young and handsome and beautiful in this one too. Based on Leo Tolstoy's "Ressurection", he plays a cad in that one as well, but happily we get to see him realize the errors of his ways and he make his wrongs right.

I must also share with you that this Anna Karenina is MUCH better than the later remake with Vivien Leigh. Skip that one, watch this one. ... Read more


8. National Velvet/Black Beauty
Director: Clarence Brown
list price: $19.96
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0000E6FPO
Catlog: DVD
Sales Rank: 13540
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Amazon.com

National Velvet
This classic family film made a star of 12-year-old Elizabeth Taylor in the title role as spunky Velvet Brown, a girl who's determined to enter her horse, Pie, in the Grand National Steeplechase. Critic Pauline Kael called it "One of the most likeable movies of all time." Mickey Rooney costars as a young man who helps Velvet train Pie for the big race. At the last minute, Velvet herself has to ride Pie in the tournament and cuts her hair to pass for a jockey. Anne Revere won an Oscar as Velvet's mother, as did editor Robert J. Kern, who cut together a terrifically exciting horse race. Donald Crisp and Angela Lansbury are also featured as members of the Brown family. --Jim Emerson

Black Beauty
Don't waste this one on your children: buy it for yourself. A spectacular adaptation of the Anna Sewell novel, this is faithful to the source material but creates a life of its own on the screen. Told from the point of view of the horse, it recalls a time and a place that could be both beautiful and cruel. Black Beauty faced both hardship and kindness as he passed through the hands of many owners throughout his life. Some are generous, but the agonies endured by the title character may be too harsh for small children. Unfortunately, director Caroline Thompson did not resurrect her magical touch a few years later with another animal tale, Buddy. --Rochelle O'Gorman ... Read more


1-8 of 8       1
Prices listed on this site are subject to change without notice.
Questions on ordering or shipping? click here for help.

Top